Events - Hopkins at Home

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EnrollmentFree Registration
 Location
Baltimore, MD
PeabodyConservatory HopkinsatHome May 28, May 28, ThursdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  May 28, 2020 - June 18, 2020 (4 weeks) Thursdays, 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM EDT  Each week will consist of a live lecture with discussion immediately afterwards. Course Description Are you frightened by the thought of unseen invaders in your living room? Do you suspect foreign agents or even your own family members of trying to poison you? Is the government lying to you? If you said yes to any of these questions then you may be ready to return to the theater of yesteryear: Radio, The Theater of the Mind. Here drama is performed on the stage of your imagination. Voices become characters and sound effects props. Like bats flying blind, with radio we create set designs in our own minds through such simple means as reverb and echo. A gasp or a held breath can thrill or tickle us as much as the special effects Hollywood now spends millions on. In this course we will investigate how radio classics like the “War of the Worlds” and “The Jack Benny Program” used mere sound and even more meagre silence to spread both panic and laughter. We will consider how the Golden Age of Radio’s favorite genres and much-beloved shows were shaped by society, technology, and politics: the fear of big government, greater equality for women, the aftermath of one shadowed by the threat of another World War, as well as the invention of radio itself and the spread of other technologies designed to bring the world right into your living room. Syllabus  Week 1: Orson Welles’ “The War of the Worlds” Realism in radio How dead air means death on the air Fear of invasion Week 2: Arch Oboler’s “Johnny Got His Gun” Radio as a way of reaching out Sound as symbol Speaking from beyond the grave Week 3: Lucille Fletcher, “Sorry, Wrong Number” Disembodied voices Women as monsters Technology is making robots of us all Week 4: Jack Benny in “The Jack Benny Program” Stereotypes and recurring characters How silence leaves room for laughter The lavender gentleman goes “swish” Hyperlinks lead to radio shows for each week, if students would like to listen before each class.  Course Instructor Associate Professor Daniel H. Foster chairs the Liberal Arts Department at the Peabody Conservatory of the Johns Hopkins University. A comparatist with a particular interest in the intersection of high and low, old and new music, literature, and drama, Foster teaches and publishes on such subjects as opera and blackface, Greek lyric and Welsh song, new media and Old Time Radio. He authored Wagner’s Ring Cycle and the Greeks (Cambridge 2010) and is currently at work on From Bards to Blackface, or How the Minstrel Changed His Tune. His articles have been published in both academic and crossover journals ranging from The Journal of American Drama and Theatre to Smithsonian Magazine, Times Higher Education, and The Paris Review.radio-the-theater-of-the-mind
 May 28, 2020
 12:00 PM
Radio the Theater of the Mind
 Location
Baltimore, MD
CareyBusinessSchool HopkinsatHome VirtualMay 28, May 28, ThursdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home The arrival of the COVID19 pandemic has led states around the world to take urgent actions aimed at protecting lives. These actions modify our daily lives dramatically with the objective of preventing the worsening of the situation into an even more disastrous one. Why haven’t we been able to implement such strong actions to address climate change? This lecture will explore how the COVID19 and climate change crises are similar in many ways, how they are directly connected, and how the pandemic can change the prospects of our abilities to become more sustainable and avoid address the threat of irreversible damage to our climate. I am a researcher on urban and real estate economics at Johns Hopkins University. My work focuses on urban dynamics, especially related to housing markets, agglomeration economies and policy-related issues like housing affordability. I also do research on determinants of growth and decline in cities in developed and developing economies. I teach courses on infrastructure development of sustainable cities, real estate and infrastructure finance, and econometrics. I tweet about housing markets, housing policy, urbanization, and methods in @leqonomics. ​ In 2020, I am co-director of the LACEA urban economics network (LAUrban)./event/HAHCovidClimate
 May 28, 2020
 07:00 PM
COVID19 and Climate Change: how does our current pandemic affect the fight against climate change?
 Ticket Options
Mini-Course EnrollmentFree Registration
 Location
Via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
SheridanLibraries HopkinsatHome June 02, June 2, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home. June 2, 2020 - June 30, 2020 (5 weeks) Tuesdays, 11am-12pm EDT The Lester S. Levy Sheet Music Collection is a gem among our Special Collections holdings. This carefully curated collection of 30,000 pieces of popular sheet music is the perfect lens through which to explore US reform movements, including suffrage, emancipation, anti-war, prohibition/temperance, and labor.   Each section will provide a brief overview of the reform movement, and dive more deeply into it through the lens of 3-4 historic songs, examining the history revealed by each song and the specific techniques used by composers to achieve the emotional affect needed to further their movement.  Schedule:   Five pre-recorded lectures (20-30 minutes each) followed by a live Q&A. Courses will become available Thursdays at 11am, remaining available perpetually. This will be followed by a live question/answer session the following Tuesday at 11am (Zoom link to be provided) Week 1: Introduction to the course; emancipation & abolition  Pre - Recorded Lecture release date and time: Thursday, May 28; 11am  Live Q&A: Tuesday, June 2; 11am   Description: This lecture will briefly introduce users to the history of the Levy Collection and give an overview of the series before diving into the emancipation movement. The lecture will include songs by African American composers that reflect period attitudes towards slavery, the civil war, and the role of black composers and performers in minstrelsy.  Week 2: Temperance & prohibition  Pre - Recorded Lecture release date and time: Thursday, June 4; 11am   Live Q&A: Tuesday, June 9; 11am  Description: This lecture will examine the temperance and prohibition movements, examining songs including “I’ll Marry No Man If He Drinks,” and “America Never Took Water and America Never Will,” to illustrate opposing perspectives of these movements.   Week 3: Labor  Pre - Recorded Lecture release date and time: Thursday, June 11; 11am  Live Q&A: Tuesday, June 16; 11am  Description: This lecture will explore the rise and fall of the Knights of Labor, the American Federation of Labor, and the impact of railroad strikes.   Week 4: Anti-war  Pre - Recorded Lecture release date and time: Thursday, June 18; 11am  Live Q&A: Tuesday, June 23; 11am  Description: Songs will be chosen from the Civil War and World War I to explore music as an anti-war protest.   Week 5: Suffrage  Pre - Recorded Lecture release date and time: Thursday, June 25; 11am  Live Q&A: Tuesday, June 30, 11am  Description: This lecture will include pro- and anti-suffrage songs, focusing on songs composed by women.   A native of Phoenix, Arizona, Sam Bessen is Assistant Curator of the Lester S. Levy Sheet Music Collection at Johns Hopkins University’s Sheridan Libraries. With a background in music performance, Sam completed his Master’s degree at the Peabody Conservatory in 2017. Sam is also the Founder and Artistic Director of the In the Stacks series at the George Peabody Library, named by Baltimore Magazine as one of eleven local institutions making classical music relevant in the 21st century. His programs have included explorations of ancient sculpture, neoclassical architecture, immersive theater, queer silent film, immersive theater, and research into university archives to uncover previously unheard works by women and African American composers. Sam’s work in performance, education, and public programming focuses on engaging with historic collections to uncover underrepresented stories. sounds-of-change-us-reform-movem
 Jun 02, 2020
 11:00 AM
Sounds of Change: US Reform Movements through the Lester Levy Sheet Music Collection
 Location
Baltimore, MD
KriegerSchoolofArtsSciences HopkinsatHome VirtualJune 02, June 2, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home Join Jeffrey Brooks as he introduces you to The Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks. During his talk, Dr. Brooks will emphasize three insights readers might take away from the book. The first is that the century roughly between 1850 and 1950 in Russia was uniquely dynamic in ways that shaped the culture. Change was at once political, economic, social, and technological, and all dimensions had cultural ramifications. A second and related insight is that the direction of influence was two way. Not only did common people and popular traditions color the great works of high literature and art—the works of high culture influenced popular and commercial works. Lastly, the formation of a uniquely Russian mix of creators and consumers, which arose as early as the 1860s.  He has talked to firebirds, foxes, and fools endlessly over the past ten years and shares his insights with Hopkins at Home!   I study and teach the political and cultural history of modern Russia, the history of the Soviet-American Cold War, and the great works of Russian and Soviet culture in their contemporary context. My The Firebird and the Fox: Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks (Cambridge University Press, 2019) showcases the genius of Russian literature, art, music, and dance over a century of turmoil within the dynamic cultural ecosystem that shaped it. The Firebird and the Fox explores the shared traditions, mutual influences, and enduring themes that recur in these art forms from 1850-1950. The book uses two emblematic characters from Russian culture—the firebird, symbol of the transcendent power of art in defiance of circumstance and the efforts of censors to contain creativity; and the fox, usually female and representing wit, cleverness and the agency of artists and everyone who triumphs over adversity—to explore how Russian cultural life changed over the period. High culture drew on folk and popular genres, then in turn influences an expanding commercial culture.  /event/HAHFirebird
 Jun 02, 2020
 12:00 PM
The Firebird and the Fox : Russian Culture under Tsars and Bolsheviks
 Location
jhu.edu/HopkinsatHome
Baltimore, MD
BermanInstituteofBioethics CareyBusinessSchool HopkinsatHome VirtualJune 04, June 4, ThursdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home From toilet paper to hand sanitizer, as the COVID19 outbreak grew into a pandemic people began sweeping the shelves, both physically and virtually, of these necessities. For some, these items were for their personal use but for others, a financial opportunity had presented itself. Join Mario Macis as he explores the economic and ethical impacts of these decisions in a time of crisis. Speakers: Mario Macis, PhD is an Associate Professor of Economics. He is also Affiliate Faculty at the JHU Berman Institute of Bioethics, Associate Faculty at the Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality at JHU Medicine, and Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) and the Institute of Labor Economics (IZA, Bonn). Between 2016 and 2019, he served as Academic Program Director of Carey's MS in Health Care Management. Prof. Macis is an applied economist and his work focuses on how economic incentives interact with psychological factors and social norms to drive individual behavior and policy-relevant outcomes. His research interests include pro-social behavior, morally controversial transactions, global health, experimental economics, development economics, and labor economics. Prior to joining Carey, he was Assistant Professor of Business Economics and Public Policy at the University of Michigan, Ross School of Business. Prof. Macis has been a consultant for the World Bank, the International Labor Organization, the National Marrow Donor Program, and the United Nations Development Programme./event/HAHscarceresources
 Jun 04, 2020
 07:00 PM
Economics & Ethics in the Allocation of Scarce Resources
 Location
Watch Online
Baltimore, MD
NitzeSchoolofAdvancedInternationalStudies HopkinsatHome VirtualJune 09, June 9, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home Nuclear weapons have long played a central but often unappreciated role in American grand strategy. In spite of the unimaginable consequences of their use in war, we know far less about how the bomb shapes U.S. national security and world politics than we should. Both our leading theories and histories have failed to fully explain important choices American leaders have made about the bomb over the past eight decades. This is less a failing of scholarship and more a reflection of the steep methodological, linguistic, and normative barriers to understanding nuclear strategy and statecraft. This challenge will only deepen, as new geopolitical and technological forces return the critical question of the purpose and consequences of nuclear weapons to the heart of the debate about the future of America’s grand strategy.  This lecture seeks to disturb this complacency about the role of nuclear weapons in U.S. grand strategy to explore important questions: What is the rationale for these weapons, and how do they advance America’s interests in the world?   Francis J. Gavin is the Giovanni Agnelli Distinguished Professor and the inaugural director of the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at SAIS-Johns Hopkins University. In 2013, Gavin was appointed the first Frank Stanton Chair in Nuclear Security Policy Studies and Professor of Political Science at MIT.  Before joining MIT, he was the Tom Slick Professor of International Affairs and the Director of the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas.  He directs the Nuclear Studies Research Initiative and, with James Steinberg, the International Policy Scholars Consortium and Network.  From 2005 until 2010, he directed the American Assembly’s multiyear, national initiative, the Next Generation Project: U.S. Global Policy and the Future of International Institutions.  Gavin is the Chairman of the Board of Editors of the Texas National Security Review, a Non-Resident Senior Advisor at the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, an affiliate of MIT’s Security Studies Program, a senior fellow of the Clements Center for National Security, a distinguished scholar at the Robert S. Strauss Center, a senior advisor to the Nuclear Proliferation International History Project at the Woodrow Wilson Center, and a life-member of the Council on Foreign Relations.  He received a PhD and MA in history from the University of Pennsylvania, an MS in modern European history from Oxford University, and a BA in political science from the University of Chicago. His writings include Gold, Dollars, and Power: The Politics of International Monetary Relations, 1958-1971 and Nuclear Statecraft: History and Strategy in America’s Atomic Age.  His latest book, Nuclear Weapons and American Grand Strategy, was published by Brookings Institution Press in January 2020./event/hahfrankgavin3
 Jun 09, 2020
 12:00 PM
Nuclear Weapons and American Grand Strategy
 Ticket Options
Mini-Course EnrollmentFree Registration
 Location
Via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
NitzeSchoolofAdvancedInternationalStudies HopkinsatHome June 15, June 15, MondayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home June 15, 2020 - July 6, 2020 (4 weeks) Mondays, 12:00 pm - 1:00 pm EDT The purpose of this short course is to introduce (or reintroduce) alumni to an important chapter in contemporary intellectual history. The course studies several writers and scholars whose work in the early Cold War was decisive for casting the conflict between the Soviet Union and the United States as a struggle between democracy (and pluralism) and totalitarianism. All of the writers in the syllabus were politically committed to the cause of the West. Koestler was the front man for the Congress on Cultural Freedom; Orwell was an outspoken critic of “fellow travelers” in Britain; Schlesinger was a founder of Americans for Democratic Action. Berlin, a native Russian speaker, was less overtly political, but he was influential behind the scenes in official Washington and London. His articles for Foreign Affairs, especially “Political ideas in the Twentieth Century,” and his radio lectures on Freedom and Its Betrayal in 1951 were genuine instances of academic thinking that had an immediate impact on public debate and even public policy. Session 1: The Indispensable Intellectual: Arthur Koestler. Date and Time: Tuesday, June 16, 12-1 pm EDT   This webinar will outline the pervasiveness of the “Soviet Myth” among intellectuals in Europe, especially in France, via a discussion of the life of Arthur Koestler. It will look at the success at Darkness at Noon, which appeared in 1940 in English but had a huge post-war success in France, and discuss the founding of the Congress on Cultural Freedom. Koestler is sometimes depicted as an anti-communist zealot: he would have replied that zealotry against Stalinism was no crime. All four of the writers discussed here, incidentally, would have agreed. Readings: Darkness at Noon   Session 2: The Road to 1984: George Orwell. Date and Time: Tuesday, June 23, 12-1 pm EDT The quintessential British antifascist and anti-communist British intellectual, Orwell was formed, politically, during the Spanish Civil War. The brutal suppression by the USSR and the Spanish Communists of all left-wing sentiment that contradicted the party line, and the willingness of progressives around the world to falsify the historical record in order to justify the USSR’s actions, awoke the powerful and deep-rooted detestation of Stalinism that gave birth, eventually, to such classics as Animal Farm, “Politics and the English Language,” and 1984. Reading: 1984, especially the chapters where Winston is interrogated by O’Brien. “Spilling the Spanish Beans,” Collected Essays, Journalism and Letters, vol. 1.   Session 3: The Ardor of Arthur Schlesinger. Date and Time: Tuesday, June 30, 12-1 pm EDT A founder of Americans for Democratic Action, Schlesinger in the late 1940s was the rising star of the historical profession. His Age of Jackson won the Pulitzer Prize; he would shortly embark on his trilogy about the New Deal. Schlesinger – greatly influenced by Reinhold Niebuhr – attacked both the Stalinism of the USSR and what he saw as the shallowness of American progressives like Henry Wallace. His book The Vital Center insisted that liberals had to fight against the myth of Soviet progressivism and prevent civilized doctrines of social reform and greater equality from being hijacked by world communism. Reading: Extract from The Vital Center   Session 4: History’s Uncertainties: Isaiah Berlin. Date and Time: Tuesday, July 7, 12-1pm EDT Born in Riga, Berlin’s family escaped the Bolshevik Revolution to come to Britain. Berlin became a part of the British establishment – he was the first Jewish Briton to become a fellow of All Souls College, Oxford. His war service in Washington DC, where he provided political intelligence to London on the Roosevelt administration, made him a lifelong supporter of the Atlantic alliance, though, unlike Schlesinger, he never became a citizen of Camelot. Berlin’s period as a Cold War Liberal, I would argue, is crucial if one wants to understand Berlin’s broader political thought. Indeed, it was a prelude to it. Reading: “Political Ideas in the Twentieth Century.”   Further Reading: The best biographies of these four writers are: Richard Aldous: Schlesinger: The Imperial Historian. Michael Ignatieff, Isaiah Berlin: A Life. D.J.Taylor: Orwell: A Life Michael Scammell, Koestler: The Indispensable Intellectual. Mark Gilbert is a British citizen. He was educated at the University of Durham and the University of Wales, where he earned his doctorate in 1990. He has been professor of history at SAIS Europe, the Bologna Campus of the School for Advanced International Studies of the Johns Hopkins University, since 2012. In 2018, he was president of the international jury of the Cundill Prize (https://www.cundillprize.com/). He is currently writing a book, to be published by Penguin / Allen Lane, on the Birth of Democracy in Italy: A Political and Social History, 1943—54.  cold-war-liberals
 Jun 15, 2020
 12:00 PM
Cold War Liberals
 Location
Baltimore, MD
KriegerSchoolofArtsSciences HopkinsatHome VirtualJune 16, June 16, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home How do we assign responsibility or blame for a pandemic? Who is deserving or undeserving of government assistance during a public health crisis? Who do we trust to provide us with information about the risks associated with coronavirus? There is no single ‘right’ answer to these questions. Instead, it is through the political process that we assign responsibility, decide who is deserving, or who we trust. This lecture will explore several ways the work of Political Science addresses these questions in ways that can provide insight into the current Covid-19 crisis and the struggle over a government response.   Adam Sheingate is a Professor of Political Science at Johns Hopkins University. Sheingate teaches courses on American politics and institutions at the graduate and undergraduate level, including a popular seminar on the politics of food. Prior to joining the Johns Hopkins faculty in 2000, Sheingate was a Prize Research Fellow in Politics at Nuffield College, Oxford. He is also a past-recipient of a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Scholar Award in Health Policy Research at the University of California-Berkeley, and he served as the Mary Ball Washington Professor in American History at University College Dublin. His most recent book is Building a Business of Politics: The Rise of Political Consulting and the Transformation of American Democracy./event/HAHPoliticsPandemic
 Jun 16, 2020
 12:00 PM
Understanding the Politics of Pandemics
 Location
Baltimore, MD
CareyBusinessSchool HopkinsatHome VirtualJune 23, June 23, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures Executive Director Christy Wyskiel has led a successful five-year campaign to reinforce and expand the Johns Hopkins innovation ecosystem. In this session, JHU Carey Business School Associate Professor Jim Liew talks to Christy about the pipeline and path forward for faculty inventions, a surge in student entrepreneurship activity, and what JHTV and other parts of the university are doing to ensure maximum impact in the COVID-19 era. Learn more! Report of the Committee on the Innovation Ecosystem (2014) https://ventures.jhu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Innovation-Report.pdf JHTV 2019 Annual Report https://ventures.jhu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/JHTV-Annual-Report-2019.pdf Christy Wyskiel is the Senior Advisor to the President of Johns Hopkins University for Innovation & Entrepreneurship. In this role, she also serves as the Executive Director of Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures, the division of the university responsible for technology transfer, industry research partnerships, and company incubation under the brand ‘FastForward.’  Since her appointment in 2013, Christy has transformed the culture of commercialization at Johns Hopkins, opening 44,000 square feet of FastForward innovation space to support startup companies, facilitating the creation of 80 companies, and generating $272 million in university revenue from licensing and industry collaborations. JHU startups have raised over $2.5 billion in venture capital during her tenure. Christy is a fierce advocate for the future of Baltimore and the role that Johns Hopkins University can play in populating the city skyline with companies borne, built and grown locally.     Dr. Jim Kyung-Soo Liew is an Associate Professor of Finance at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and revels in pushing the boundaries of financial knowledge and product development both as an academic and FinTech entrepreneur. He has published pioneering research in the intersection of social media big data, machine learning, blockchain, and financial markets./event/HAHinnovation
 Jun 23, 2020
 12:00 PM
Innovation to Impact: Commercialization at Hopkins