Events - Hopkins at Home

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Free LivestreamFree Registration
 Location
Baltimore, MD
KriegerSchoolofArtsSciences SchoolofMedicine HopkinsatHome Virtual October 19, October 19, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg Distinguished Professors Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome REGISTER BELOW to tune in on Tuesday, October 19, 2021 at 12 PM ET Today, Jeff Coller, PhD, studies the building blocks of life. As a Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of RNA Biology and Therapeutics and a Scientific Co-Founder at Tevard Biosciences, his work focuses on messenger RNA, a molecule that transmits information from DNA to other parts of the cell. With applications in areas such as gene therapy and vaccine development - the Moderna vaccine, for example, is an mRNA vaccine - this increasingly important field is not only changing the way we approach many healthcare issues, it’s helping to save lives.   But Professor Coller didn’t always know that’s what he wanted to do. In fact, he started undergraduate studies unsure of what he wanted to pursue at all. So how did he get to where he is today? And how did he know that he, too, could be a scientist? In this presentation, Professor Coller will talk about the work he does and explain some of his own professional journey – from growing up in Flint, Michigan to the undergraduate course on genetics that got him hooked in the first place to working at Hopkins today.   Join us to learn about messenger RNA, what it’s like to be a scientist, and how anyone can play a part in changing people’s lives.  i-never-knew-i-d-help-save-lives
 Oct 19, 2021
 12:00 PM
I Never Knew I’d Help Save Lives: An mRNA Biologist’s Journey
 Ticket Options
Free LivestreamFree Registration
 Location
Baltimore, MD
WhitingSchoolofEngineering HopkinsatHome Virtual October 26, October 26, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home and Johns Hopkins Office of Government and Community Affairs Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome REGISTER BELOW to tune in on Tuesday, October 26, 2021 at 12 PM ET COVID-19 spread across the world with a speed and intensity that laid bare the limits of our understanding of the transmission pathways of such respiratory diseases. After much confusion and misinformation, there emerged a consensus that airborne transmission from very small respiratory droplets is the most important route for the spread of COVID-19. Each stage in this transmission pathway is mediated by complex flow phenomena, ranging from air-mucous interaction inside the respiratory tract, turbulence in the exhaled jet/ambient flow, to inhalation and deposition of these aerosols in the lungs. Given the emergence of the Delta-variant and the resurgence of infections in many communities, the importance of communicating infection risk across scientific disciplines, as well as to policy/decision makers, is more important than ever. Inspired by the Drake Equation that provides a framework to estimate the seemingly inestimable probability of advanced extraterrestrial life, I propose a relatively simple model for estimating the risk of airborne transmission of a respiratory infection such as COVID-19. The model couples ideas from fluid dynamics with factors involved in airborne transmission and predicts the effects of social distancing and facemask use on transmission risk. The model is designed to serve not only as a common basis for scientific inquiry across disciplinary boundaries, but to also be understandable by a broad audience outside science and academia.the-un-known-un-knowns-of-covid-
 Oct 26, 2021
 12:00 PM
The (Un)known-(Un)knowns of COVID-19 Transmission - An Engineer's Perspective
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Mini-Course EnrollmentFree
 Location
Baltimore, MD
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome Virtual November 04, November 4, Thursday  Brought to you by Hopkins at Home Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome November 4, 2021 - November 18, 2021 (3 sessions) Thursdays, 6:00 - 7:00 PM ET This Hopkins at Home course invites you to make your own discoveries as you read and discuss this classic of ancient culture. We will begin by reviewing the encapsulated plot summary, which is supplied by the Homeric poet in book one, at a Council of the gods on Mount Olympus. Decisions made at this council then set the stage for the interconnected adventures of Odysseus, his wife Penelope, and their son Telemachus—who was an infant when his father left but is now about twenty. We will follow these three plot lines as they play out across all 24 books of the Odyssey. For each of our three discussion sections, you will have the option of writing a close reading of a pre-selected passage of text, about 15-20 lines in length. Participants who choose to do so can share some of their observations in the weekly discussion sections.  There will be three pre-recorded lectures for this class, plus an introductory review of oral poetry. This introductory overview will also include a step-by-step guide to the close-reading process. The three class lectures, each of which is followed by a discussion section, are designed to guide your reading of the twenty-four books of The Odyssey.  Course text: The Odyssey of Homer, translated by Richmond Lattimore (Harper Collins).  https://www.harpercollins.com/products/the-odyssey-of-homer-richmond-la…  Please note that there are many used copies of Lattimore’s translation of The Odyssey available from Amazon and other vendors. The year of publication does not matter, and cover images may vary; just keep in mind that you are strongly encouraged to use only Richmond Lattimore’s translation for this class. We will be looking closely at the text, and there may be significant variations in the phrasing of different translations. You may also find it helpful to have the paper text at hand to write your own notes in.  the-odyssey-of-homer-a-close-re2
 Nov 04, 2021
 06:00 PM
The Odyssey of Homer: a Close Reading