Events - Hopkins at Home

 Location
Via livestream
Baltimore, MD
CareyBusinessSchool HopkinsatHome Virtual July 21, July 21, Wednesday Brought to you by Hopkins at Home and the Johns Hopkins Executive Education Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome July 21, 2021 - July 28, 2021 (2 sessions) Wednesdays, 5:30 - 6:30 PM ET Get a taste of Johns Hopkins Executive Education’s Academy for Emerging Leadership. As we move out of this “unprecedented year,” the workplace has obviously changed forever. The subgroup that is the most affected are early professionals who have entered the workforce or began their careers in the last five years. While workplace culture shifts have resulted in new levels of autonomy and flexibility, younger professionals are looking for tools and strategies both to adjust to this new norm, and to find their professional place as they evolve into our future leaders.   Through the Designing your Professional Future course, participants will be introduced to key components of the Leadership Coaching and Life Design methodologies. As we combine these dynamic approaches, we also present tools and strategies to pave the way for participants to think differently about how their personal and professional goals can be created, implemented and sustained long term.  Over the course of two, one-hour segments, participants will have the time and space to assess areas of their work there are interested in developing, gain a better understanding of how to engage in effective goal setting and action planning, and discuss how to make these growth opportunities sustainable into the future.  Upon completing the Designing your Professional Future course, participants will have a clear understanding of the various programming options provided by Johns Hopkins Executive Education and where alignment exists between one’s own professional aspirations, existing coursework and how to take the next step in their unique professional development. Weeks 1 + 2: The Value of Experimentation + Developing/Sustaining a Life Design Mindset  Week 1:  Pillar One: Awareness + Empathy: Self-Assessment/Self-Reflection/ Self-Empathizing  Week 2:   Pillar Two: Action + Prototyping: Goal Setting, Action Planning + Prototyping/Testing    Instructors Carly Ackley is an Executive Education faculty member at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School and has over 15 years of administrative and teaching experience in business schools in the Mid-Atlantic. As both a university administrator and instructor, she has spent her career researching and teaching leadership development. Her administrative work has been focused on project management, admissions, leadership development, research and assessment.  Most recently her work has been focused on coaching and executive education and she holds certifications in both executive and career coaching. In addition to her work as a practitioner, she has also taught courses at both the Smeal College of Business at Penn State and at Johns Hopkins University in leadership development, executive coaching and theoretical and practical ethics. Carly earned her Ph.D and M.Ed from the The Pennsylvania State University and has been published in both international peer-reviewed journals and has written book chapters on the topic of leadership and environmental justice.   Anna Fitzgibbon, Carey '18, is an Executive Education faculty member at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, specializing in Innovation and Human-Centered Design. Anna is the Founder and Owner of OutGrowth, an experiential learning company that designs transformational immersive programming for students and professionals.  Outside of OutGrowth, Anna is a corporate wellness coach, a mentor and a member of Beta Gamma Sigma. With experience traveling and working in over 25 countries, she earned her MBA from The Johns Hopkins Carey Business School, and has a professional background in human-centered design, higher education, program development, community development, adventure tourism, voluntourism, wellness and outdoor education.   Interested in the Academy for Emerging Leadership? If you are a professional with less than five years of work experience, the Academy for Emerging Leadership is your opportunity to learn from Johns Hopkins faculty and gain the confidence and business skillsets to grow in your career. Meet the challenges and demands of today’s dynamic business world with executive education courses, certificates, and customized leadership and management training for continued learning from the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. Johns Hopkins Carey Business School alumni receive a 100 percent tuition scholarship on one Executive Education program per calendar year. Alumni from all other Johns Hopkins University divisions receive a 50 percent tuition scholarship on one Executive Education program per calendar year. Get started today. Visit the Academy for Emerging Leadership for a full course schedule and more information or email carey.execed@jhu.edu    2018-09-01 -- 10 -- 00 -- AM -- -- 10 -- 15 -- AM -- 3910 Keswick Road -- -- Baltimore -- MD -- 21211 -- USA -- 1 -- -- 200 -- Session 1 Name Session 1 Name emerging-leadership-academy
    SOLD OUT
 Jul 21, 2021
 05:30 PM
Designing Your Professional Future
 Ticket Options
Alumni & Guest FREE
 Location
Virtual
NA
Affinity HopkinsatHome Virtual July 29, July 29, ThursdaySponsored by Peabody, JHAA Affinity, Hopkins at Home, and The Office of Diversity and Inclusion 2020 brought us more than a pandemic. During this unprecedented time, violence against members of the APIDA community has spiked and continued discrimination against APIDA individuals is now squarely the focus of public attention. Join us for a panel discussion with members of the Hopkins APIDA community about their personal experiences over the last year and what they believe the next 12 months may bring. Following this livestream, we invite participants to join our panelists in small group conversations via Zoom guided by two exploratory questions: 1. How do we combat the growing APIDA hate and violence in our communities? 2. Where do APIDA stories and efforts for equity and anti-racism fit into today’s current public discourse and the increased focus on the Black Lives Matter movement?   MEET OUR SPEAKERS AJ Tsang, A&S '19           AJ Tsang graduated from Johns Hopkins in 2019 with a B.A. in French and a B.A in Public Health, with a concentration in health policy, economics, and management. At Hopkins, AJ served as Student Body President and worked as a research assistant at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and as a PILOT leader for biostatistics, epidemiology, and microeconomics courses. He also served as a Presiding Official on the Ethics Board and as a student representative on the Mental Health Task Force, the Diversity Leadership Council (DLC), and the Homewood Council on Inclusive Excellence (HCIE), where he co-chaired the Climate, Culture, and Campus Experience Subcommittee. During his time in the Student Government Association (SGA), AJ led the final years of SGA’s long-term advocacy campaign for the construction of a student center; established SGA’s Civic Engagement Committee and Policy Research and Development Commission; and started SGA's Shared Governance Initiative, which aimed to enhance the role of students, faculty, and staff in university policymaking processes. AJ currently works as a Senior Consultant at Booz Allen Hamilton, where he supports clients in the federal health space and serves as an executive member of the firm's Asian- and Pacific-American Network (APAN). AJ is also a member of Hopkins' Baltimore Young Alumni Committee and has been part of efforts to form an Asian-, Pacific-Islander-, and Desi-American (APIDA) affinity group for Hopkins alumni. AJ also served on the alumni working group that developed alumni-focused recommendations for the next iteration of Hopkins' Roadmap on Diversity and Inclusion. Anisha Anand, A&S '18               Anisha Anand graduated from Johns Hopkins in 2018 with majors in Economics and International Studies. She currently works in New York at Brookfield Asset Management in Private Funds, assessing investor demand and assisting capital raising efforts for Brookfield’s investment strategies. Prior to her current role, she worked at BNY Mellon for 2 years. While on campus, Anisha worked at the Office of Alumni Relations, was a member of Alpha Phi, and served as Secretary General of JHUMUNC her senior year. She is originally from Dallas, Texas. Dr. Suhnne Ahn           Suhnne Ahn joined the musicology faculty at Peabody Conservatory in 1997 after completing her Ph.D. in musicology from Harvard University. Her dissertation, “Genre Style, and Compositional Procedure in Beethoven’s ‘Kreutzer’ Sonata, Opus 47,” was written under the direction of Lewis Lockwood and examines Beethoven’s creative process in composing this masterpiece as well the hybridization of concerto and sonata genre influences contained within. Her research interests include Beethoven sketch studies, 19th-century chamber music, and the early formation of the Paris Conservatory. Ahn’s work has been published in The Beethoven Violin Sonatas: History, Criticism, Performance by University of Illinois Press. Most recently, her scholarly endeavors are directed toward the ongoing development of a web-based “e-edition” of the violin concerti of the triumvirate of Parisian virtuosi Rodolphe Kreutzer, Pierre Rode, and Pierre Baillot. Ahn came to the study of musicology through her early activities as a performer. She received her B.A. in music from Yale College. While turning toward musicology, she studied piano as an undergraduate at the Yale School of Music and attended the Aspen Music Festival. Influential piano teachers include Charlotte Martin, Arlene Portney, Ward Davenny, and Herbert Stessin. Ensemble experiences as a violinist in numerous youth orchestras in Oklahoma were also significant. Her familiarity with both the piano and string repertoire steered her toward and informs her scholarly work on Beethoven’s chamber music. Her awards include the Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst (DAAD) for study in Berlin, the Oscar Straus Schafer Teaching Fellowship recognizing devotion to undergraduate teaching at Harvard, the Paine Traveling Fellowship for research in Bonn, and Peabody Faculty Development grants that have facilitated research pursuits in Krakow and Paris. In addition to teaching courses in her area of expertise, Ahn has offered a variety of seminars with topics ranging from sixteenth century English polyphony to the chamber music of Brahms to twentieth century opera. Her classes on Russian music history and the history of the Requiem were tributes honoring Baltimore’s homage to sister city St. Petersburg and the anniversary of 9/11 respectively. A recent seminar on the Paris Conservatory provides an opportunity for musicians from all disciplines to examine early pedagogical issues associated with their own instruments or voice type. Outside the Conservatory, Ahn served as the Director of Student Affairs at Peabody Preparatory from 1997 until 2002. From 2002 to 2014, she was the House Dean of Harnwell College House at the University of Pennsylvania, where she also taught several courses in the critical writing program with an emphasis on cinema studies, and from 2015 to 2016, she served as Dean of Residential Life and Student Activities at the Colburn School in Los Angeles. Most recently, Ahn has taught within Peabody’s liberal arts curriculum offering undergraduate cinema courses on the American actress Katharine Hepburn and East Asian and Asian-American representation in film. In Fall 2018, Ahn assumed the position of Director of the Peabody at Homewood program, the music minor curriculum within the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. She currently serves on the committee of the Yale Friends of Music, is a board member of the Jonathan Edwards Trust at Yale, and has been a long-standing member of the American Musicological Society (AMS). MEET OUR MODERATOR Dr. Katrina Caldwell               Katrina Caldwell, Ph.D joined Johns Hopkins University as the Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) on July 1, 2020. In her role at CDO Dr. Caldwell will serve as the primary steward of the Roadmap on Diversity and Inclusion, align D&I initiatives with university priorities, and coordinate and collaborate with the university’s divisions on D&I matters. Dr. Caldwell will also serve as the ex officio co-chair of the Diversity Leadership Council, alongside Ashley Llorens, Chief of Intelligent Systems Center at the Applied Physics Laboratory and chair of the Diversity Leadership Council. Dr. Caldwell has more than 26 years of progressive leadership experience in higher education, with a focus on strategic planning and implementation. Dr. Caldwell holds a Ph.D and master’s degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a bachelor’s degree from Spelman College. Prior to accepting the role of CDO at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Caldwell served as University of Mississippi’s first vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement beginning for three years, beginning in 2017. As vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement Dr. Caldwell lead University of Mississippi’s efforts to create a diverse and welcoming environment, building an infrastructure to increase community engagement, and targeting high impact areas for transformation. Dr. Caldwell has a long record of strategic planning and implementation around diversity initiatives. In her role as the assistant vice president for diversity and equity at Northern Illinois University Dr. Caldwell was responsible for overseeing several departments within the Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management and developed innovative trainings and programming for constituencies throughout the university. In her eight years at DePaul University Dr. Caldwell served as director of adult student affairs starting in 2004 and by 2008 was developing cultural education programs with emphasis on social justice and diversity and serving on the President’s Diversity Council responsible for advancing DePaul’s university-wide diversity strategic plan. From 1998-2004 Dr. Caldwell served as the assistant dean of minority affairs at the University of Illinois in Chicago, developing and successfully implementing a strategic plan to increase outreach to prospective students, retention and graduation of graduate fellowship students, and professional development programs. Prior to 1998 Dr. Caldwell served as director of the Higher Education Basics Program, Student Assessment and Outcomes at East-West University and associate director of the Summer Research Opportunities Program at University of Illinois in Chicago. Dr. Caldwell was a Diversifying Faculty in Illinois fellow and her honors include the White House’s Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, Illinois College Personnel Association Award for “Outstanding Contribution to Social Justice,” and Who’s Who in Black Chicago. Diversity MBA magazine recognized Dr. Caldwell and awarded her as one of the Top 100 Under 50 Executive and Emerging Leaders in 2011. The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University.july-being-other-
 Jul 29, 2021
 07:00 PM
"Being Other": A Community Discussion Series
 Location
Via livestream
Baltimore, MD
SchoolofMedicine HopkinsatHomeAugust 10, August 10, Tuesday Brought to you by Johns Hopkins Medicine – A Woman’s Journey on Hopkins at Home  Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome  REGISTER HERE to join the livestream on Tuesday, August 10 at 7-8 p.m. EDT Psychiatrist and former public school teacher Hal Kronsberg, M.D., discusses the signs of anxiety that children may be feeling about returning to school after a tumultuous year of virtual learning. The discussion will address isolation, loneliness, apprehension, depression and suicide ideation, which has tripled among adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic. SPEAKER Hal Kronsberg, M.D. A former public school teacher, Dr. Kronsberg's clinical, educational, and research interests focus on providing mental health care outside of the traditional clinic setting.  He serves as psychiatrist for Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center's School-based Mental Health Program in numerous Baltimore City public schools and the Child Mobile Treatment team.  He also serves on the Maryland Behavioral Health Integration in Pediatric Primary Care's Project ECHO, which aims to educate pediatricians across Maryland on topics and practices relating to child and adolescent mental health. As a medical educator, Dr. Kronsberg is interested in the connection between clinical care and the social determinants of mental health and psychodynamic psychiatry.  He was the inaugural scholar for Johns Hopkins Bayview's Psychiatry Academy of Clinician Educators, was an AACAP awardee for the Psychodynamic Faculty Training Mentorship Initiative, and was recognized by the child and adolescent psychiatry trainees in 2019 for excellence in clinical teaching.  In 2021, he was named the Program Director for the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Fellowship./event/AWJHAHBacktoSchool
 Aug 10, 2021
 07:00 PM
A Woman's Journey: Preparing Children to Return to School
 Location
Via livestream
Baltimore, MD
KriegerSchoolofArtsSciences HopkinsatHome Virtual August 19, August 19, Thursday  Brought to you by Hopkins at Home Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome August 19, 2021 - September 2, 2021 (3 sessions) Thursdays, 6:00 - 7:00 PM ET This Hopkins at Home course invites you to make your own discoveries as you read and discuss this classic of ancient culture. We will begin by reviewing the encapsulated plot summary, which is supplied by the Homeric poet in book one, at a Council of the gods on Mount Olympus. This council takes place ten years after the end of the Trojan War, which had itself lasted ten years. By this time, all of the surviving Greek heroes have achieved their “nostos” or homecoming with the exception of Odysseus, who has been languishing for the past seven years on the island of the sea nymph Kalypso. The goddess Athena, however, has decided it is now time to set in motion a series of events that will bring Odysseus home. Decisions made at the opening Council of the gods on Olympus set the stage for the interconnected adventures of Odysseus, his wife Penelope, and their son Telemachus—who was an infant when his father left but is now about twenty. We will follow these three plot lines as they play out across all 24 books of the Odyssey. For each of our three discussion sections, you will have the option of writing a close reading of a pre-selected passage of text, about 15-20 lines in length. Participants who choose to do so can share some of their observations in the weekly discussion sections.  About our speaker  Elizabeth Patton has taught The Odyssey since 2003 in the interdepartmental consortium course, Great Books at Hopkins, which she has directed since 2008. As Senior Lecturer in the Alexander Grass Humanities Institute, she also directed JHU’s Master of Liberal Arts Program (MLA) from 2016-18. Dr. Patton holds an MA in Comparative Literature with a focus on classical and medieval oral-formulaic composition, and a doctorate in English and Comparative Literature from Columbia University, where she first taught The Odyssey in the Columbia’s Literature-Humanities (Lit-Hum) program. Her publications include studies of the remnants of oral composition in Medieval and Renaissance literature, and the focus of her current research is the recovery of lost or overlooked works by early modern women, such as the Elizabethan noblewoman, Dorothy Arundell (1570-1613). Dr. Patton has reconstructed Arundell’s lost English biography of the sixteenth-century Jesuit, John Cornelius, by collating formerly unattributed manuscript and print sources, including contemporary translations of Arundell’s work into Latin, Spanish and Italian.   Course text: The Odyssey of Homer, translated by Richmond Lattimore (Harper Collins).  https://www.harpercollins.com/products/the-odyssey-of-homer-richmond-lattimore?variant=32123208826914  Please note that there are many used copies of Lattimore’s translation of The Odyssey available from Amazon and other vendors. The year of publication does not matter, and cover images may vary; just keep in mind that you are strongly encouraged to use only Richmond Lattimore’s translation for this class. We will be looking closely at the text, and there may be significant variations in the phrasing of different translations. You may also find it helpful to have the paper text at hand to write your own notes in. There will be three pre-recorded lectures for this class, plus an introductory review of oral poetry (e.g., the “ring structure” of oral-formulaic composition, the dactylic hexameter line, and the oral poet’s use of epithets such as “much enduring Odysseus,” “circumspect Penelope,” and “thoughtful Telemachus”). This introductory overview will also include a step-by-step guide to the close-reading process. The three class lectures, each of which is followed by a discussion section, are designed to guide your reading of the twenty-four books of The Odyssey.  Lecture one, to be followed by a discussion on Thursday, August 19, 6 - 7 PM   Assigned reading: The Odyssey, Books 1-6:   At a Council of the gods on Mount Olympus (Book 1), Athena proposes a plan.  Telemachus then calls a Council in Ithaca (Book 2); Penelope’s weaving strategy is discovered; Telemachus leaves Ithaca secretly to visit two war heroes.  When Athena leaves Mount Olympus to visit Telemachus in Book 1, Hermes also departs from Olympus to go and inform the nymph Kalypso that she must release Odysseus from her island; This thematic thread I pick up in books 5 and 6.  Lecture two, to be followed by a discussion on Thursday, August 26, 6 - 7 PM  Assigned reading: The Odyssey, Books 7-15: “The Great Travels”   In books 7-8, Odysseus is received at the court of the Pheaecians in Scheria  In books 9-12, he recounts his adventures during a ten-year effort to return home.  In books13-15, Odysseus and Telemachus return, separately, to Ithaca.  Session 3: Thursday, September 2, 6 - 7 PM  Assigned reading: The Odyssey, Books 16-24:   A series of recognition scenes concludes with that of Odysseus and Penelope.  Odysseus secretly assembles his troops.  The suitors are defeated Telemachus’s plea to the gods in Book 2 is resolved.  A final vignette of the suitors in Hades, and the restoration of order in Ithaca. 2021-08-12 -- 6 -- 00 -- PM -- -- 7 -- 00 -- PM -- Online -- -- Baltimore -- MD -- 21211 -- USA -- 1 -- -- 200 -- Session 1 Name -- 0 -- 0 Session 1 Name the-odyssey-of-homer-a-close-rea
 Aug 19, 2021
 06:00 PM
The Odyssey of Homer: a Close Reading