Being Other: American Indian, Native, and Indigenous People

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Sponsored by Peabody, JHAA Affinity, Hopkins at Home, and The Office of Diversity and Inclusion

As we wrap up another year in a global pandemic, we are learning that COVID-19 has disproportionately affected Native, Indigenous, American Indian, and Alaskan Native populations and that these health disparities are not new. Coupled with the continued loss of native lands and recent discoveries of indigenous graves beneath schools, this year has been more than challenging for those communities. Join us for a panel discussion with members of the Hopkins community as they share their perspective and personal experiences from over the last year and what they believe the next 12 months may bring. 
 
Following this livestream, we invite participants to join our panelists in small group conversations via Zoom guided by two exploratory questions: 
 
1. What can we do to support native and indigenous communities and people today? 
2. Where do the stories of native and indigenous people, and efforts for equity and anti-racism, fit into today’s current public discourse?
 

ABOUT Joshuaa Allison-Burbank
Joshuaa D. Allison-Burbank PhD, CCC-SLP

Joshuaa D. Allison-Burbank, PhD, CCC-SLP is Diné and Acoma Pueblo. His clans are Tł'ógi, Parrot Clan (Acoma), Tó'áhani, and Yellow Corn (Acoma). Joshuaa is a licensed speech-language pathologist and previously worked at Northern Navajo Medical Center in Tsé Bitʼaʼí, Navajo Nation. He continues to provide developmental services to Navajo families enrolled in the Navajo Nation Early Intervention Program. His prJoshuaa D. Allison-Burbank, PhD, CCC-SLP is Diné and Acoma Pueblo. His clans are Tł'ógi, Parrot Clan (Acoma), Tó'áhani, and Yellow Corn (Acoma). Joshuaa is a licensed speech-language pathologist and previously worked at Northern Navajo Medical Center in Tsé Bitʼaʼí, Navajo Nation. He continues to provide developmental services to Navajo families enrolled in the Navajo Nation Early Intervention Program. His previous clinical work included being a Research Project Coordinator for the Culturally Responsive Early Literacy Instruction: American Indian/Alaska Native graduate training program at the University of Kansas. His research interests include community assessment, parent coaching, assessing the effects of stress on neurodevelopment, and the prevention of developmental delay in American Indian children. Dr. Allison-Burbank received his master’s and doctoral degrees from the University of Kansas where he focused on neurodevelopmental disabilities and prevention research. He has a Public Health Training Certificate in American Indian Health from Johns Hopkins University. He attended the University of New Mexico where he received a BA in Speech and Hearing Sciences. Joshuaa has held several leadership positions recently including vice chair of the Multi-Cultural Committee (MCC) within the Association of University Centers on Disabilities and co-chair of the Native American Caucus within the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA). Dr. Allison-Burbank is based at the Johns Hopkins office in Albuquerque, NM.

ABOUT Jennifer Parisien
Jennifer Parisien, BUS '13

Jennifer Parisien is a member of the Turtle Mountain Band of Chippewa Indians. Jennifer is a graduate of Minnesota State University with a Bachelors in Finance and holds a Masters in Finance from the Carey Business School at Johns Hopkins University.
She is currently a Relationship Manager at FS Advisors, a Native American-owned financial advisory firm, where her primary role is to assist tribal governments with project development, grant management, and strengthening financial management.
Prior to serving in her capacity, Jennifer was a legislative policy analyst at the Native American Finance Officers Association where she advocated for tribal inclusion in the areas of accounting, finance, and economic development. Jennifer was recognized by the former GASB Chairman David Vaudt for leading a group of volunteers to write the only accounting and financial reporting guide for tribal governments.
In her spare time, she enjoys spending time with her two daughters and competitively golfing with her husband.

ABOUT Katrina Caldwell
Chief Diversity Officer

Katrina Caldwell, Ph.D joined Johns Hopkins University as the Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) on July 1, 2020. In her role at CDO Dr. Caldwell will serve as the primary steward of the Roadmap on Diversity and Inclusion, align D&I initiatives with university priorities, and coordinate and collaborate with the university’s divisions on D&I matters. Dr. Caldwell will also serve as the ex officio co-chair of the Diversity Leadership Council, alongside Ashley Llorens, Chief of Intelligent Systems Center at the Applied Physics Laboratory and chair of the Diversity Leadership Council.

Dr. Caldwell has more than 26 years of progressive leadership experience in higher education, with a focus on strategic planning and implementation. Dr. Caldwell holds a Ph.D and master’s degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a bachelor’s degree from Spelman College. Prior to accepting the role of CDO at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Caldwell served as University of Mississippi’s first vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement beginning for three years, beginning in 2017. As vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement Dr. Caldwell lead University of Mississippi’s efforts to create a diverse and welcoming environment, building an infrastructure to increase community engagement, and targeting high impact areas for transformation.

Dr. Caldwell has a long record of strategic planning and implementation around diversity initiatives. In her role as the assistant vice president for diversity and equity at Northern Illinois University Dr. Caldwell was responsible for overseeing several departments within the Division of Student Affairs and Enrollment Management and developed innovative trainings and programming for constituencies throughout the university. In her eight years at DePaul University Dr. Caldwell served as director of adult student affairs starting in 2004 and by 2008 was developing cultural education programs with emphasis on social justice and diversity and serving on the President’s Diversity Council responsible for advancing DePaul’s university-wide diversity strategic plan.

From 1998-2004 Dr. Caldwell served as the assistant dean of minority affairs at the University of Illinois in Chicago, developing and successfully implementing a strategic plan to increase outreach to prospective students, retention and graduation of graduate fellowship students, and professional development programs. Prior to 1998 Dr. Caldwell served as director of the Higher Education Basics Program, Student Assessment and Outcomes at East-West University and associate director of the Summer Research Opportunities Program at University of Illinois in Chicago.

Dr. Caldwell was a Diversifying Faculty in Illinois fellow and her honors include the White House’s Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring, Illinois College Personnel Association Award for “Outstanding Contribution to Social Justice,” and Who’s Who in Black Chicago. Diversity MBA magazine recognized Dr. Caldwell and awarded her as one of the Top 100 Under 50 Executive and Emerging Leaders in 2011.

 Event Date
Tuesday, November 30, 2021
Start Time: 7:00pm EST
End Time: 8:00pm EST

 Contact
Office of Alumni Relations
4105160808
alumevents@jhu.edu

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