MINI ACADEMY | "Annapolis and the 240th Anniversary of the Battle of Yorktown- British, American, and French Perspectives"

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Brought to you by Odyssey
October 30, 2021- All Day Session
Saturday, 9:00 AM ET (start time pending) (7 course hours)

Want to feel like a midshipman for a day, taking history classes in Annapolis? “Mini Academy” is back! On October 19, 1781, British General Charles Cornwallis surrendered to General George Washington, Commander-in-Chief of the United States Continental Army, effectively ending the military portion of the Revolutionary War, although limited hostilities would continue as the political path to American independence took almost three additional years. Annapolis played a prominent role in many key events both preceding and following the Battle of Yorktown as an emerging nation struggled to meet the obligations of the subsequent Treaty of Paris. The city served as the first peacetime capital of the United States, where Congress accepted George Washington’s resignation as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army and ratified the Treaty of Paris. Congress also made two crucial appointments: Thomas Jefferson as a trade minister to France and John Jay as Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Join us as two United States Naval Academy instructors analyze the historical significance of the Battle of Yorktown and its aftermath, including how Annapolis connected the Revolution to the Constitution. This all-day Saturday seminar will include academic presentations, character speakers representing historical figures, guided bus and brief walking tours of relevant sites of interest, and lunch. 

Note: The activities of the day will require participants to walk for short distancesThe location and final itinerary with the order of the sessions will be sent to participants beforehand. Lunch (included with the program).

Session 1: The Siege of Yorktown  

This battle was a critical turning point in the Revolution; it convinced the British it was impossible to retain the American colonies through war. In October 1781, combined French and American forces under General George Washington and the Comte de Rochambeau surrounded a British army led by Lord Cornwallis, leading to the surrender of over 7,000 soldiers, a major part of a much larger campaign that carried the war as far afield as the West Indies and the English Channel as well as closer to home. Annapolis served as a crucial staging post for French soldiers camped on the grounds of St. John's College and was thus an important component of the defeat of the British Empire in America. Matthew Dziennik, PhD, University of Edinburgh, is an Associate Professor of British and British Imperial History in the Department of History at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis and is the author of The Fatal Land: War, Empire, and the Highland Soldier in British America (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).  He previously served as a guide at the National Colonial Battlefield Park in Yorktown and is currently working on a book about military recruitment in the British Empire.  

Session 2: French Soldiers' Camp Guided Bus and Brief Walking Tour 

On the way to Yorktown, French forces, including Marquis de Lafayette, camped in Annapolis from March 12 - April 6, 1781. Five months later, French soldiers en route to the battle stayed at a separate camp at St. John's College; dozens of them died and were buried on site. In all, over 1,000 French soldiers died in America's Revolution.  We will take a bus to visit the monument that was dedicated to their burial ground along College Creek in 1911 (the site is a short walk from the bus drop off point. 

Session 3: The Treaty of Paris  

Almost two years after the Siege of Yorktown, the Treaty of Paris was signed on September 3, 1783. Many believe this treaty simply ended the war, and it did, but it also kicked off a difficult and violent four-year period often overlooked in the history books, where a broke Congress could not meet its domestic or international financial obligations as mandated by the treaty. After multiple but ultimately futile attempts to overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles, a key meeting in Annapolis that met as Shays’ Rebellion was underway convinced many key founders that the Articles of Confederation must be replaced with an entirely new Constitution. Annapolis as a city—and Maryland as a state—were center stage as the United States struggled to meet its responsibilities as a newly sovereign nation. Mark Croatti, MA, University of Southern California, is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, teaching courses on the U.S. Constitution, Comparative Politics, and International Relations.  

Session 4: A Discussion with “John Jay”  

John Jay played a key role in the evolution of the early United States from a regional alliance to a unified state; he served as one of the presidents before George Washington under the Articles of Confederation and then became Minister to Spain; he helped negotiate and later signed the 1783 Treaty of Paris that was ratified in Annapolis, where he was appointed Secretary of Foreign Affairs and subsequently became Secretary of State; he was a co-author of The Federalist Papers; and he became the first Chief Justice of the United States Supreme Court after the new Constitution went into effect. “John Jay” will provide intriguing details of his most notable achievements and then take questions from the audience. Phillip Webster, MDiv., Trinity Evangelical School, has portrayed John Jay in public since 1998 and has written four books on the American Revolution.  

Session 5: A History Lesson inside the Maryland State House  

Annapolis played a prominent role in many key events both preceding and following the Battle of Yorktown as an emerging nation struggled to meet the obligations of the subsequent Treaty of Paris. After the surrender of Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, Annapolis served as the first peacetime capital of the United States from 1783-84, when Congress accepted General George Washington’s resignation as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army, ratified the Treaty of Paris, and made two crucial appointments: Thomas Jefferson as a trade minister to France and John Jay as Secretary of Foreign Affairs. We will hear details of these events and see exactly where they took place. 

About the Instructors

Mark Croatti Headshot

 

 

Mark Croatti, MA, University of Southern California, is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science at the United States Naval    Academy in Annapolis, teaching courses on the U.S. Constitution, Comparative Politics, and International Relations.


Matthew Dziennik Headshot

Matthew Dziennik, PhD, University of Edinburgh, is an Associate Professor of British and British Imperial History in the Department of History  at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis and is the author of The Fatal Land: War, Empire, and the Highland Soldier in British    America (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).  He previously served as a guide at the National Colonial Battlefield Park in Yorktown and is currently working on a book about military recruitment in the British Empire.

 

John Jay Headshot

Phillip Webster, MDiv., Trinity Evangelical School, has portrayed John Jay in public since 1998 and has written four books on the American Revolution.  

 

Tuition Remission and Refund Policies

Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu

After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.  

Please visit the registration and policies page for more information. 

While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.  
 

While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated. 

 Event Date
Saturday, October 30, 2021
Start Time: 9:00am EDT

 Contact
Odyssey
410-516-8516
odyssey@jhu.edu

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