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KriegerSchoolofArtsSciences HopkinsatHomeJuly 07, July 7, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  Scientists tell us that people who deny climate change, Covid-19, or other inconvenient facts are irrational because they are violating a fundamental scientific principle called The Requirement of Total Evidence. In determining how reasonable it is to believe something, as well as act on it, you must take into account all the evidence available. You must not cherry-pick your evidence to suit your needs. Dr. Peter Achinstein challenges this principle. Tune in to consider scientific cases, a legal case, and an everyday case in which disregarding evidence is perfectly proper and the right thing to do.    Peter Achinstein specializes in philosophy of science and has interests in the history of science as well. In addition to numerous articles and reviews in these fields, he is the author of Concepts of Science (1968), Law and Explanation (1971), The Nature of Explanation (1983), and Particles and Waves (1991). The latter, which received the Lakatos Award, is a study of methodological problems arising from three episodes in 19th-century physics: the wave-particle debate about light, the development of the kinetic-molecular theory, and the discovery of the electron. Recent publications include The Book of Evidence (2001), which develops a theory of scientific evidence and applies it to cases in the history of science, Science Rules: A Historical Introduction to Scientific Methods (2004), Scientific Evidence (2005), and Evidence, Explanation, and Realism (2010), which is a collection of his essays. In 2011, he was honored by a festschrift, Philosophy of Science Matters: The Philosophy of Peter Achinstein.  This contains 20 papers on his work by former students and other important writers.  Evidence and Method (2013) discusses the scientific methods of Isaac Newton and James Clerk Maxwell.  In 2018 he published Speculation: Within and About Science, which raises the question of what a scientific speculation is, and whether and when speculating is ever legitimate in science. He has held Guggenheim, NEH, and NSF fellowships, and has served as a visiting professor at MIT, Stanford, and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. He is a founder and Director of the Johns Hopkins Center for History and Philosophy of Science./event/HAHAchinstein
 Jul 07, 2020
 12:00 PM
Disregarding Evidence
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity July 07, July 7, TuesdaySponsored by the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity & Evergreen Museum & Library This three-part, virtual lecture series will explore different facets of Evergreen Museum & Library’s exterior, shedding light on how the house and its grounds changed over the course of a century. Originally constructed in 1858, the home was occupied by two generations of the wealthy Garrett family between 1878 and 1952. During its near 100 years as a private residence, the house expanded in size and scope to accommodate the needs of its residents and changing tastes in architectural and landscape design. Using photos and architectural drawings, these virtual presentations will explore those changes, the reasons for them, and their impact on the exterior aesthetics of Evergreen. Part I - Historic Garden and Grounds Explore the storied gardens and grounds of Evergreen, an exemplar of American landscape architecture at the turn of the 20th century. Lori Finkelstein, the Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library, and April Oettinger, professor of Art History at Goucher College, will guide you through the meandering paths, bubbling brooks, fountains, fragrant plantings, and exotic greenhouses that have welcomed generations to Evergreen. This presentation will illuminate the people, places, and garden history that shaped the extraordinary green spaces beyond the walls of this Gilded Age Baltimore mansion. This event will be presented on Zoom.  Please, join us for Part II: An Ever-Expanding Evergreen on July 14th and for Part III: Evergreen in the 20th Century on July 21st.  MEET OUR SPEAKERS Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., The Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., is the Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library. Dr. Finkelstein received both her M.A. and her Ph.D. in U.S. History from New York University, and her B.A. in North American Studies from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She came to Evergreen in the spring of 2019 after a long career as a museum educator and curator at institutions including Mt. Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden in New York City, the Baltimore Museum of Industry, and the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, where she was the Vice President of Education, Interpretation, and Volunteer Programs from 2010 to 2019. Throughout her career in museums, Dr. Finkelstein has kept one foot in the classroom, teaching in Johns Hopkins’ undergraduate Program in Museums and Society and providing curricular support for the university’s online Master of Arts Program in Museum Studies. In addition, she has taught courses as an adjunct professor at Stevenson University and Seton Hall University.  April Oettinger, Ph.D, Professor of Art History, Chair of the Visual & Material Culture Program, & Director of the Sweren Wogan Institute for the Study of the Book, Goucher College April Oettinger, Ph.D., is professor of Art History, chair of the Visual & Material Culture Program, and director of the recently inaugurated Sweren Wogan Institute for the Study of the Book at Goucher College. Her recent publications, which have appeared in journals including Artibus et Historiae, The Journal of Word and Image, and Source,trace the relationship of humans and nature in the early modern era, Renaissance print culture and the production of knowledge, and the role of visual and literary culture in shaping early modern natural science. She has been the recipient of a Fulbright Foundation Fellowship and the Dame Francis Yates Fellowship at the University of London’s Warburg Institute. Along with Karen Hope Goodchild and Leopoldine Prosperetti, she is co-author of Green Worlds in Early Modern Italy: Art and the Verdant Earth (Amsterdam University Press, 2019).   exteriors-at-evergreen-series-pa
 Jul 07, 2020
 03:00 PM
Exteriors at Evergreen Series - Part I: Historic Gardens and Grounds
VirtualJuly 08, July 8, WednesdaySponsored by Lifelong Learning You see others showing up in life and owning who they are. They have a certain walk and a certain air about them and appear to be the most amazing and most confident people in the office—the most amazing and most confident people on the planet! How do they do it?! This webinar will show you how to take control of how you show up at work and in life every day. You will learn the four pillars of communication that determine your overall effectiveness and how well your image and message leave a memorable impression on others. You will also learn how to go from being ordinary to extraordinary and get practical action items that you can turn into habits that position you to show up and show out in business and in life. The webinar will be presented by Bridgett McGowen, an award-winning international professional speaker, a publisher, and popular business author. Bridgett has been a professional speaker since 2001 and has spoken on programs alongside prominent figures such as former President Barack Obama, Deepak Chopra, Alex Rodriguez (A-Rod), Oprah Winfrey, Shonda Rhimes, Katie Couric, and Janelle Monae. She is the author of Show Up and Show Out: 52 Communication Habits to Make You Unforgettable, Rise and Sizzle: Daily Communication and Presentation Strategies for Sales, Business, and Higher Ed Pros; and REAL TALK: What Other Experts Won't Tell You About How to Make Presentations That Sizzle./event/showupshowout
 Jul 08, 2020
 12:00 PM
Show Up + Show Out: Communication Habits to Make You Unforgettable
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Affinity July 08, July 8, WednesdaySponsored by the SAIS New York Alumni Club The private sector has been experiencing increasing pressure to address environmental, social, and governance (ESG) from several constituencies. For example, the Business Roundtable, comprised of U.S. CEOs, issued an August 2019 letter redefining its definition of the purpose of a corporation, putting the interests of employees, customers, suppliers, and communities on par with shareholders. The world’s largest asset manager, BlackRock, issued a January 2018 letter alerting investees that Blackrock would be increasing its commitment to active engagement. Are corporations accelerating their ESG response? Join our panel for a lively discussion focused on the private sector’s ESG activities. Our panelists will shed light on corporate actions managing ESG risks. MEET OUR PANELISTS Manju Seal (A&S Parent '22), Head of Sustainable Finance, Advisory, BMO Capital Markets Manju Seal heads advisory with corporate and institutional clients for incorporating ESG criteria in investments and financing while charting a path towards improved sustainability.  She collaborates with clients in identifying impactful solutions around sustainable bond underwriting, product development and other sustainable financing activities.  Her expertise in Green/Social/Transition/Sustainability-Linked Bonds and other sustainable finance products makes her privy to engage with issuers and investors on the client side and offer them thought-provoking insights on sustainable investing.  She was the Project Lead for establishing BMO’s Sustainable Bond Program (2019) which led to BMO’s first-ever sustainability bond issuance, was a key architect of BMO’s sustainable finance commitment announced in June 2019,and co-authored BMO’s Sustainable Financing framework (a first for Canada). She spearheads broader thought leadership for ESG/sustainable finance at BMO. She is a host of award-winning BMO Sustainability Leaders Podcast Series, and an American Marshall Fellow (gmfus.org) Manju has 20+ years of professional experience ranging in institutional asset management, investment banking, social/environmental  impact organizations and board leadership.  She has spent 15+ years in the financial industry with an emphasis in client advisory, risk management and debt capital market solutions.  Her investment banking career started in Structured Finance Group-FICC of Goldman Sachs and finally, she led GSAM’s Fixed Income - Risk & Performance Analytics Team.  More recently, she led the startup Leap201.org  - a foundation for Southeast Asian  farmers living below $2 a day.  A polymath, she has master’s degrees in business administration, mathematics and ethnomusicology. Anna Palazij (Engineering '02), Senior Director of Sustainability and ESG Reporting at PepsiCo Anna Palazij holds the role of Senior Director of Sustainability Reporting within the Corporate Office of Sustainability at PepsiCo.  Her scope includes overseeing ESG reporting, ensuring sustainability data integrity, and leading sustainability digitalization and development of analytics to help drive attainment of PepsiCo’s sustainability commitments globally.  Anna has over 15 years of experience in the sustainability field.  In her prior roles at PepsiCo, she sustainability programs for over 50 North American beverage manufacturing locations and launched Recycle Rally, one of PepsiCo’s consumer recycling programs.  Prior to joining PepsiCo, Anna worked at General Electric in EHS management, operations, and Lean Six Sigma roles. Anna holds a Bachelors of Science in Civil Engineering and a Masters of Science in Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University as well as a Masters in Business Administration from the Yale School of Management.   She is a member of The Aspen Institute Business & Society Leaders Forum and has also served as an Advisory Council Member for Johns Hopkins University Environment, Energy, Sustainability and Health Institute (E2SHI).  Leela Ramnath (SAIS '08), Director of Environmental, Social, Governance at Warburg Pincus LLC Leela Ramnath is Director of ESG at Warburg Pincus, a global private equity firm, where she focuses on environmental, social, and governance issues at the firm and portfolio companies. Prior to joining Warburg Pincus, she led impact and partnerships at TAU Investment Management. She has worked in international development at Technoserve and the Millennium Challenge Corporation. Previously, she worked at Barclays in emerging markets and in securitized products at a global insurer.  Leela is a Term Member at the Council on Foreign Relations, and holds an S.B. degree in Economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and an M.A. in International Relations from the School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) at Johns Hopkins University. Lauren Magnusson, Director, Environmental, Social, Governance Trust and Transparency at Walmart Lauren Magnusson is a director on Walmart’s Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG), Trust and Transparency team. Her work aims to help the Walmart and the ESG industry define and innovate towards robust metrics that measure performance to drive positive outcomes, stakeholder engagement and strategy development. Since joining Walmart in 2015 Lauren has worked in global responsibility finance, merchandise/operations finance and international finance focusing on providing decision support and analysis to business partners across the company.  Lauren received her MBA from University of Chicago Booth School of Business and a BS in International Business and Marketing from University of South Carolina. Bruce Schlein (SAIS '95), Director of Impact Investing and Resource Efficiency Finance at Citi MEET OUR MODERATOR Sherin R. Gobran In a career spanning client portfolio management / equity research, emerging markets and impact investing, Sherin developed the skill-set to deploy capital with a purpose through the public and private markets, including privatizations, strategic growth and blended finance. Prior to re-launching with JPMorgan as an Investment Advisor, she accessed capital to invest in sustainable and impact enterprises, raising seed capital from values-aligned angel investors, foundations and DFIs, having started her development experience with OPIC.  SevenSeasMusic, a web-based platform, successfully concluded initial seed raise, exceeding angel circle guidelines. As well, Sherin held multiple roles in asset / wealth management and research.  At Barclays, she was a member of the investment committee, developing model client portfolios and sector research, building on her success at Citi, in driving growth in US and LATAM equity assets in advisory from $1 billion to $11 billion. Entrepreneurially-driven, Sherin was tapped to launch  initiatives in the emerging markets. She joined Morgan Grenfell to establish a LATAM equity research team after leading privatization mandates in Emerging Europe and structuring private initiatives in the Middle East/North Africa, for Bankers Trust.  Sherin completed a joint degree graduate program, with an MBA from The Wharton School, where she was nominated a Government Business Fellow, and an MA in Asian Studies from the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. This event will be presented on Zoom. a-shift-in-environmental-social-
 Jul 08, 2020
 03:00 PM
A Shift in Environmental, Social, and Governance Approach: Is Corporate Action Accelerating
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Affinity July 09, July 9, ThursdaySponsored by the Real Estate Affinity The housing affordability conundrum runs at the heart of a functioning society and is a challenge in both the developed and emerging world. Join our panelists as they discuss ideas and positive experiences from around the globe and along with best practices. We'll discuss the definition of affordable housing, the factors that have led towards an increasing under-supply of affordable housing across the globe, and solutions. This event will be presented on zoom. MEET OUR PANELISTS James Hoddell (SAIS '10), Principal and Owner, Emerge Developments Limited James is a well-rounded property development professional with experience in establishing and running best-in-class real estate development and management businesses both in Europe and emerging markets. He has originated and delivered a number of ground-breaking and profitable projects including factory outlet centres in Italy and the UK and malls and mixed-use developments in East Africa. James attended Radley College and the Unversity of Reading where he specialized in European land use studies, planning, and development. He received an MA from SAIS in 2010. Matthew E. Kahn, Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Economics and Business at Johns Hopkins University and the Director of JHU's 21st Century Cities Initiative Matthew E. Kahn is the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Economics and Business at Johns Hopkins University and the Director of JHU's 21st Century Cities Initiative . He is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research and a research fellow at IZA. He has taught at Columbia, the Fletcher School at Tufts University, UCLA and USC. He has served as a Visiting Professor at Harvard and Stanford and as the Low Tuck Kwong Distinguished Visiting Professor at the National University of Singapore. He is a graduate of Hamilton College and the London School of Economics. He holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago. He is the author of Green Cities: Urban Growth and the Environment (Brookings Institution Press 2006) and the co-author (joint with Dora L. Costa) of Heroes and Cowards: The Social Face of War (Princeton University Press 2009). He is also the author of Climatopolis (Basic Books 2010) and Blue Skies over Beijing: Economic Growth and the Environment in China (joint with Siqi Zheng published by Princeton Press in 2016). He has also published three other Amazon Kindle books on urban economics and microeconomics. His research focuses on urban and environmental economics. LaQuida Chancey, Founder and Director, Smalltimore Homes, and Owner, Xavier Estates, LLC LaQuida is an experienced real estate investor, entrepreneur, IT manager, and owner of Xavier Estates, LLC, a full service real estate company. In February of 2018, LaQuida started Smalltimore Homes, an affordable housing and sustainable living solution focusing on enhancing community living and improving neighborhoods by creating alternative ownership opportunities and financial literacy workshops. The mission of Smalltimore Homes is to provide those living below the poverty level, specifically those experiencing homelessness, with micro shelter and tine home solutions. Providing families with individualized supportive wrap around services, as well as tailored housing solutions with a goal of obtaining and maintaining affordable housing. Their ownership programs and volunteer building activities are a catalyst to help community members reach their goals and fulfill their potential. LaQuida holds a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science with a Mathematics minor from Spelman College.  Richard Koss, Chief Research Officer, Recursion Co.  Richard Koss is Chief Research Officer at Recursion Co, a leading big data mortgage Fintech company based in New York. At Recursion Koss is responsible for delivering solutions to a wide variety of investors, lenders, servicers and government agencies using Recursion’s cutting-edge technology platform. He is also Adjunct Professor at the School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA) at Columbia University. From 2015-2017 he was Visiting Scholar in the Research Department at the International Monetary Fund, and Director of the IMF Global Housing Watch. Previously, he was the Director of Capital Markets Research at Fannie Mae and their key spokesperson on the global housing and economic environment, with an emphasis on secondary market developments. Previous academic experience includes an appointment as Adjunct Professor at the Carey School of Business at Johns Hopkins University from 2015-2018. Prior to joining Fannie Mae, Koss spent over 20 years in senior positions on Wall Street. Earlier positions include Staff Economist at the Council of Economic Advisers under Chairman Alan Greenspan. Koss is the past Chairman of the Conference of Business Economists and a member of the Economic Club of NY. His research interests include US housing finance policy, financial markets, and global real estate with an emphasis on India and China. Koss received his Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Pennsylvania and his B.S. in Mathematics and Statistics from Case Western Reserve University. Andrew Hinton (Business '17), Partner, GL Capital LLC Andrew Hinton manages operations, development, and sales for GL Capital. Andrew supervises construction and renovations for GL Capital’s existing portfolio and new acquisitions. Andrew also oversees property management functions including leasing, maintenance, and tenant communications. Finally, Andrew leads efforts for disposition of existing assets as well as runs his own residential sales business with Keller Williams. Prior, Andrew earned a Master of Art in design at Maryland Institute College of Art and Master of Business Administration at Johns Hopkins Carey Business School. Andrew specialized in marketing during his business school career. Andrew also worked as a mentor for out of school youth in North Philadelphia. Andrew also worked to develop affordable technologies for developing communities around the world. One enterprise commercialized greenhouse technology in rural Kenya and South Africa.    the-housing-affordability-conund
 Jul 09, 2020
 03:00 PM
The Housing Affordability Conundrum: A Global Discussion
 Location
Baltimore, MD
SchoolofMedicine HopkinsatHomeJuly 09, July 9, ThursdaySeveral agencies are planning to send humans to Mars in the next 10-20 years. Although humans have been venturing into space for almost 60 years, a Mars mission presents new and unprecedented challenges. Many of the physiological risks are understood, but will be exacerbated due to the duration (up to three years) and distance of the trip. Psychological and cognitive issues that arise from having a small number of people in extended isolation and confinement will take on great importance; countermeasures for these issues are currently insufficient. Medical events will arise and the crew will have to address them with limited resources and sparse information. In addition to a dramatic increase in crew autonomy due to communication delay with Earth (up to 20 minutes one way), the biggest concern is the thing that we have not yet thought of: the “unknown unknown” that will arise due to unexpected interactions in an extreme environment. Join Dr. Shelhamer as he discusses NASA’s approach to these problems and its limitations. Explore new ways of thinking about human resilience that will be required for a journey to Mars.  https://journals.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/japplphysiol.00717.2015   Dr. Shelhamer is on the faculty of Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, where he started as a postdoctoral fellow in 1990. He has bachelor’s and master’s degrees in electrical engineering from Drexel University, and a doctoral degree in Biomedical Engineering from MIT. At MIT he worked on sensorimotor physiology and modeling, including the study of astronaut adaptation to space flight. He then moved to Johns Hopkins where he continued the study of sensorimotor adaptation with an emphasis on the vestibular and oculomotor systems. He has applied nonlinear dynamical analysis to the control of eye movements, including investigations of the functional implications of fractal activity in physiological behavior. In parallel with these activities, he has had support from NASA to study various aspects of sensorimotor adaptation to space flight, amassing a fair amount of parabolic flight (“weightless”) experience in the process. He also serves as an advisor to the commercial spaceflight industry on the research potential of suborbital space flight. Dr. Shelhamer is the author of Nonlinear Dynamics in Physiology: A State-Space Approach, has published over 80 scientific papers, and has had research support from NIH, NSF, NASA, NSBRI, and the Whitaker Foundation. From 2013 to 2016 he was on leave from his academic position to serve as Chief Scientist for the NASA Human Research Program at the Johnson Space Center. In this role, he oversaw NASA’s research portfolio to maintain human health and performance in long-duration space flight. /event/HAHTripToMars
 Jul 09, 2020
 07:00 PM
Biomedical Challenges of a Trip to Mars
 Location
Join us online via the link above
SNFAgoraInstitute HopkinsatHomeJuly 10, July 10, Friday  What: SNF Agora Conversations: Protest, Activism, and Organizing  When: Friday, July 10, 12–12:45 p.m. ET  Where: https://bit.ly/SNFAgoraLive  As protesters across the country continue to demand an end to racial injustice and police violence, as the coronavirus pandemic persists, and as the United States heads into one of the most contentious and high-stakes presidential elections in recent history, join the SNF Agora Institute and Johns Hopkins SAIS for a conversation on how, amid multiple crises, people can come together to navigate this historic moment.  Guests:  Kanisha Bond is an assistant professor of political science at Binghamton University. Her research focuses on internal conflict, contentious politics, and social movement organizational behavior. She is particularly interested in how gender, race, and ideology influence individual mobilization into political action, how social movement organizations recruit and manage their membership, and the impact of these internal processes on inter-group collaboration.       Filipe Campante is the vice dean for education and academic affairs at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, and the Bloomberg Distinguished Associate Professor of International Economics at Johns Hopkins. He is interested in political economy, development economics, and urban/regional issues. His research looks at what constrains politicians and policy makers beyond formal checks and balances, including cultural norms, institutions, media, and political protest.      Erica Chenoweth is the Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs at Harvard Kennedy School and a Susan S. and Kenneth L. Wallach Professor at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Studies at Harvard University. She studies political violence and its alternatives. She is author of numerous books, including the forthcoming Civil Resistance: What Everyone Needs to Know (2021), which explores what civil resistance is, how it works, why it sometimes fails, how violence and repression affect it, and the long-term impacts of such resistance.   The panel will be moderated by Hahrie Han, professor of political science at Johns Hopkins and director of the SNF Agora Institute.  More information, here: https://snfagora.jhu.edu/event/protest-activism-and-organizing//event/SNFAgora_AngerProtestsActivism06192020
 Jul 10, 2020
 12:00 PM
*Rescheduled* - WEBCAST: SNF Agora Conversations: Protest, Activism, and Organizing
 Ticket Options
Free Registration
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome July 13, July 13, MondayBLAST COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES (from AGHI on Hopkins@Home) Dates: Mondays/Thursdays from July 13th through August 14th (5 weeks) Class Type: 2 recorded videos per week (with one live group meeting TBD) Course Description: What makes a bad mother? Why do so many works of fiction—from classic works of literature to present-day TV and film—center around bad mothers? And how do important factors, especially those rooted in race and class, feature in the decision about who is a “bad” mother? This course takes up these questions in order to consider what counts as mothering. We will ask how it came to be understood as natural, perhaps as the cornerstone of womanhood itself, but also how characters across fiction and outside it have shown the problems with this supposedly instinctive ideal. Across this 5-week Blast Course, we will focus on five topics: 1) “Introducing the ‘Bad Mother,’” across fiction and history; 2) the ideal of the “Angel in the House”; 3) the horror of the “Monster/Mother”; 4) the question of whether “A Mother’s Work” is ever done; and 5) looking at the present and future of “Mothers, Assisted.” Some works considered will include Medea, a variety of fairy tales, Leave It to Beaver, The Babadook, Pride & Prejudice, Schitt’s Creek, and Parasite. Insights from thinkers including bell hooks, Toni Morrison, Dorothy K. Roberts, Adrienne Rich, and Audre Lorde will help us as we re-consider the bad mothers all around us. Instructor: Sarah Ross (she/her) Open to the public [image credit: "Great Gatsbys" by Kate Beaton (Hark! A Vagrant) (c) 2010]blast-course-bad-mothers-in-lite
 Jul 13, 2020
 11:00 AM
Blast Course: "Bad Mothers—in Literature, On Screen, and Across History"
 Ticket Options
Free Registration
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome July 13, July 13, MondayBLAST COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES (from AGHI on Hopkins@Home) Course Title: “Modern Painting and Prostitution" Dates: Tuesdays/Fridays from July 13th through August 14th (5 weeks) Class Type: 1 lecture + 1 live discussion meeting (Zoom, Fridays at 11 AM) per week  Course Description: This course offers an introduction to the conventional history of modern painting and suggests that it is dependent on objectifying the female body, particularly the colored body, as a commodity. Studying two iconic pictures—Édouard Manet’s Olympia and Pablo Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon—we will see that it is the logic of prostitution, or the female and colored body as a commodity, that first drives the qualities of frankness, raw confrontation, and rough handling now associated with modern painting. Why do these qualities depend so directly on presenting female bodies as transactional? Looking at the motivations and afterlives of these pictures, we will ask this question while studying a range of figures—Paul Cézanne, Paul Gauguin, and Henri Matisse among them—central to the history we have inherited about modern painting. We will then read feminist debates on the construction of the prostitute as a figure associated with modernity and focus on the status of the black model in modernism, and subsequently in black portraiture, by closely considering Denise Murrell’s landmark exhibition Posing Modernity: The Black Model from Manet and Matisse to Today (2018). In our last week, we will use our discussions to analyze the self-portraits and writings of an artist we don’t know enough about yet, the Indian-Hungarian painter Amrita Sher-Gil (1913-1941), and ask what sort of artistic strategies female-identifying artists of color outside Euro-America have used to reclaim the centrality of their bodies, and themselves as subjects, in painting. Instructor: Meghaa Ballakrishnen, History of Art and Program for Women, Gender, and Sexuality (she/her) Open to the public [image credit: A Little Taste of Outside Love by Mickalene Thomas (© Brooklyn Museum 2007)]blast-course-modern-painting-and
    SOLD OUT
 Jul 13, 2020
 11:00 AM
Blast Course: “Modern Painting and Prostitution”
 Ticket Options
Free Registration
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome July 13, July 13, MondayBLAST COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES (from AGHI on Hopkins@Home) Course Title: “Conceptualizing the Pandemic: Emergency Humanities during COVID-19" Dates: Mondays/Thursdays from July 13th through August 14th (5 weeks) Class Type: 2 recorded videos per week (with one live group meeting TBD) Course Description: The COVID-19 pandemic has generated intense debate, critique, and comment among scholars and public intellectuals to an extent not seen in many years in a public sphere typically fragmented by specialized interests. In February 2020, during the early weeks of the pandemic, philosopher Giorgio Agamben published his thoughts on the state of emergency declared in Italy, thenceforth inviting a series of commentaries and controversies. But Agamben’s comments were based on his body of philosophical work spanning decades, and many did not take note of his views in this larger context. Soon other philosophers, geographers, anthropologists, and authors joined in on the vociferous debate—a unique instance of major public intellectuals convening to discuss a singular world event. This course examines how philosophers and other public intellectuals have conceptualized the COVID-19 pandemic. Areas covered in the selected readings include declarations of emergency by many world governments, the possibly exaggerated but not impossible threat of human extinction in the event of a pandemic in the anthropocene, economic consequences of the pandemic, and, finally, possibilities of alternate futures previously unimagined. These readings are paired with empirical research published in medical and public health journals. Lectures will be based on carefully selected readings, most of which are available as online blog posts and articles (mostly very short), with a few selections from books for theoretical perspective. All readings are available online and/or will be emailed to students. Instructor: Arpan Roy, Anthropology (he/him) Open to the public [image credit: A Sicilian fresco from 1445. In the previous century, the Black Death killed at least a third of Europe’s population.Credit...Werner Forman/Universal Images Group/Getty Images]blast-course-conceptualizing-the
 Jul 13, 2020
 12:00 PM
Blast Course: "Conceptualizing the Pandemic: Emergency Humanities during COVID-19"
 Ticket Options
Free RegistrationFree Registration
 Location
MD
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome July 13, July 13, MondayBLAST COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES (from AGHI on Hopkins@Home) Course Title: “The Northern Irish Troubles: Literature of Conflict” Dates: Mondays/Thursdays from July 13th through August 14th (5 weeks) Class Type: 1 lecture + 1 live discussion meeting (Zoom) per week Course Description: This course will cover the Northern Irish literary scene during and immediately following the period of conflict known as The Troubles (1968-1998). In the process of investigating the specifics of the Northern Irish Troubles, this course will question the structural roots of violence and the ways in which authors register and represent structural violence compared to direct violence in writing. The course will also question the differences between writing during times of conflict and writing after the “end” of conflict. By considering the scarred landscape and traumatized society left in the wake of imperial and local violence in Ireland, we will ask what it means to live in and build a post-conflict society. By the end of this introductory course students will be familiar with modern and contemporary Northern Irish literature of conflict. Through particular attention to the politics surrounding Irish Republicanism, British Unionism, and sectarian violence broadly, students will develop the tools to appreciate the relationship between literature and society, to critique modes of colonial oppression, and to understand the fraught relationship between rebels combating state injustice and domestic terrorism. Classes will center around specific texts that will be provided ahead of time, but the amount of reading a student completes before class will be at their own discretion and ability. Authors considered in this class include: John Montague, Colm Tóbín, Eavan Boland, Ciaran Carson, Medbh McGuckian, Michael Longley, Seamus Heaney, Derek Mahon, Lisa McGee, Anna Burns, and Sinéad O’Shea. Instructor: Daniel T. McClurkin, English (he/him) Open to the public [image credit: "Free Derry" wall (screenshot from Sinéad O’Shea’s documentary, “A Mother Brings Her Son to Be Shot," 2017)]blast-course-the-northern-irish-
    SOLD OUT
 Jul 13, 2020
 12:00 PM
Blast Course: "The Northern Irish Troubles: Literature of Conflict"
 Ticket Options
Free Registration
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome July 13, July 13, MondayBLAST COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES (from AGHI on Hopkins@Home) Course Title: “What Is Knowledge?" Dates: Tuesday/Fridays from July 13th through August 14th (5 weeks) Class Type: 2 recorded videos per week (with one live group meeting TBD) Course Description: In this world of Fake News, it can be difficult to sort out what we know. In this course, we will be asking ourselves the following questions about knowledge and more: How can I trust my beliefs? What is happening when I believe something false? Can I guess the right answer and still be said to know it? What if I have a lot riding on the answer, does this change what it takes to know? No previous coursework in philosophy is assumed. The first two weeks is about skepticism, or the position that we do not know things that we think we know. Typically, knowledge is assumed to be a justified true belief. So, we will discuss false beliefs as well. Next, we will address counterexamples to this view. Guessing the right answer seems like an agent does not really know, but why? The final week will be about contextualism. Contextualists argue that if it really matters to you, then there is a higher standard for whether or not I know something. We will discuss Descartes, Plato, and some contemporary figures as well.   On Tuesdays I will send out an email with that week’s reading, only 5-10 pages, and a link to that week’s lecture. You should do the reading before watching the lecture. Once you have viewed the lecture, you will send me your questions. On Fridays I will upload a video in which I answer all of your questions. Instructor: Cara Cummings, Philosophy (she/her) Open to the public [image credit: Still Life: Milk Jug and Fruits on a Table by Paul Cézanne (© National Museum of Norway)]blast-course-what-is-knowledge-
 Jul 13, 2020
 12:00 PM
Blast Course: “What Is Knowledge?”
 Ticket Options
Free Registration
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome July 13, July 13, MondayBLAST COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES (from AGHI on Hopkins@Home) Course Title: “Latinx Immigration and Literature: Interpreting the Border" Dates: Mondays/Thursdays from July 13th through August 14th (5 weeks) Class Type: 1 lecture + 1 live discussion meeting (Zoom) per week Course Description: How does crossing borders—geographical, metaphorical, linguistic—construct and affect the Latinx subject in the United States? How does the phenomenon of the immigrant detention center change the discourse on border crossing and the public’s perception of Latinx immigrants, and how might the written word provide a counternarrative? “Latinx Immigration and Literature: Interpreting the Border” is an introduction to the ongoing Mexican and Central American refugee crisis and immigrant detention practices through the lenses of Latinx writers, as well as primarily female scholars working on incarceration, politics, border studies, language, and Chicana/o and Latinx Studies. Since speaking Spanish and indigenous languages tend to double inscribe migrants as other, the texts of the course will also consider the role of bilingual communication in relation to racism and xenophobia, institutional disempowerment, mediation, and possibilities for activism. This course features writing by the Mexican writer Valeria Luiselli, who is at the forefront of spreading awareness about child migration; the Chicana writer Helena María Viramontes, famous for her compassionate and dignifying portrayals of Latinx characters; and anonymous, detained minors themselves, who in writing poetry, tell audiences outside of the detention center their dreams of living in the United States. This course will have readings to complete before lecture and short preparatory tasks before discussion. Please procure copies of Tell Me How It Ends: An Essay in 40 Questions, Dreaming America: Voices of Undocumented Youth in Maximum-Security Detention, and Their Dogs Came with Them ahead of time. No prior knowledge needed – all are welcomed! Instructor: Alexandra Lossada, English (she/her) Open to the public [image credit: Kikito by street artist JR (2017)]blast-course-latinx-immigration-
    SOLD OUT
 Jul 13, 2020
 01:00 PM
Blast Course: “Latinx Immigration and Literature: Interpreting the Border”
 Ticket Options
Free Registration
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome July 13, July 13, MondayBLAST COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES (from AGHI on Hopkins@Home) Course Title: “Human Achievement or Alien Technology? —Astronomy and Astrology in Ancient Egypt" Dates: Mondays/Thursdays from July 13th through August 14th (5 weeks) Class Type: 1 lecture + 1 live discussion meeting (Zoom, 7-8pm) per week Course Description: Did aliens build the pyramids? What did ancient Egyptians know about the universe? Should astrology be considered a science? I invite you to explore the answers with me by traveling back in time to ancient Egypt, a place and time that have long captured the public’s imagination. By the end of the class, you will reach a better understanding of ancient Egyptians’ achievements in science, while also strengthening your critical thinking skills. Class materials consist of open access videos and blogs, along with a few articles prepared by the instructor. Each week, students will watch a pre-recorded lecture (60 min) and attend a synchronous meeting on Zoom (60 min). During the Zoom meeting, the instructor will lead a discussion on a specific topic (see syllabus). Students will prepare for the discussion by completing the week’s task listed on the syllabus. The estimated preparation time is approximately 20 minutes each week. It is recommended that students also engage with the additional resources listed on the syllabus. Instructor: Lingxin Zhang, Near Eastern Studies (she/her) Open to the public [image credit: "Orion hangs over a statue of Isis at the Sanctuary of Egyptian Gods at Nea Makri, Greece" (photo by Stavros Hios)]blast-course-astronomy-and-astro
    SOLD OUT
 Jul 13, 2020
 07:00 PM
Blast Course: “Astronomy and Astrology in Ancient Egypt”
 Ticket Options
Free Registration
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute HopkinsatHome July 13, July 13, MondayBLAST COURSES IN THE HUMANITIES (from AGHI on Hopkins@Home) Course Title: “Discriminating Taste: Understanding the French Approach to Fashion, Conversation, Food, and Art" Dates: Mondays/Thursdays from July 13th through August 14th (5 weeks) Class Type: 1 lecture + 1 live discussion meeting (Zoom, Thurs. at 8 PM) per week Course Description: France. Whether you have travelled there by plane or only in your imagination, you have likely sensed that, although the United States is a wealthier and mightier nation by far, France nevertheless retains a certain cultural superiority over her younger sibling. Indeed, the entire world seems to bow to the French in matters of taste: the Michelin Guide, haute couture, the Louvre, and the art of French living all seem to occupy the upper limits of our collective imagination of artistic and cultural aspirations. Why? In this course, we will investigate the nature, meaning and historical foundations of French authority in matters of taste with reference to its most celebrated thinkers, monarchs, and tastemakers. Special attention will be paid to the relationship between taste and politics, special hierarchies of taste, and taste and social class. Certain ethical issues will arise during the course of the lectures, such as whether French taste deserves our allegiance and the effects of globalization on cultural identities generally. By the end of the five-week period, you will have pierced the mystery of the French je ne sais quoi once and for all! Or, at the very least, you will be familiar with important French thinkers and artists from the early modern period and their influence on contemporary life and current debates. This course is open to anyone who agrees with Oscar Wilde’s statement that “you can never be overdressed or overeducated.”  All lectures and materials will be provided in English. Minimal reading assignments will also be provided.  Schedule: Each week a video lecture will be made available to you by 8am on Monday that you may enjoy at your convenience, but no later than by Thursday of that week. On Thursday evenings at 8pm, we will meet online for a live discussion of the lecture where your questions and comments will be most welcome. Instructor: Dr. Nicole Karam, Modern Languages and Literatures—French (she/her) Open to the public [image: The Enceladus Fountain at Versailles, cleaned in 2020]blast-course-discriminating-tast
    SOLD OUT
 Jul 13, 2020
 08:00 PM
Blast Course: "Discriminating Taste: Understanding the French Approach to Fashion, Conversation, Food, and Art"
 Location
Baltimore, MD
KriegerSchoolofArtsSciences HopkinsatHomeJuly 14, July 14, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  REGISTER HERE: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-long-journey-to-womens-suffrage-registration-109970253990?aff=HopkinsatHome This coming August 18th marks the 100th Anniversary of the ratification of the 19th  Amendment giving women the vote. This webinar addresses the philosophic and cultural obstacles that prolonged women’s battle to win the vote. Elizabeth Cady Stanton launched the women’s suffrage movement in 1848, inspired by the liberal ideology embodied by the Declaration of Independence, and firmly rooted the women’s rights movement in this revolutionary document. However, deeply embedded assumptions about the role of women, in particular, the “cult of womanhood” posed serious obstacles to achieving the goals of women’s suffrage, delaying reform for women for another 72 years. Early in the movement, women aligned with abolitionist reformers to advance shared goals of equality.   This alliance broke under Stanton’s and other suffragette leaders’ frustration when the goals of formerly enslaved people were advanced by the passage of the 14th  and 15th Amendments, leaving the rights of women behind. Some women resorted to racist rhetoric and allied themselves to segregationist southerners to advanced women’s interests, an ugly part of the women’s movement that needs to be addressed. After the passage of the 15th  Amendment, the movement struggled and splintered into two main groups, the National Women’s Suffrage Association (NWSA) and The National Women’s Party (NWP). Finally, the advent of World War I created an opportunity for women to break free from the “cult of womanhood” by making valuable contributions to the war effort, taking on tasks and jobs traditionally filled by men. Throughout the struggle, women showed great strength and determination and endured many setbacks.  Join Dorothea Wolfson to discuss the women's movement from all angles. Dive deeper into the movement's complexities of being informed by the Declaration of Independence, an axiom of equality that endures to this day.  Learn about the tribulations and mistakes of the movement, but celebrate the triumphs, too. For more information about JHU’s Women’s Suffrage Centennial Commemoration, visit https://womensvote100.jhu.edu/ https://womensvote100.jhu.edu/. Dorothea Wolfson, PhD, is the Director of the Master of Arts in Government and Thesis Advisor for the Government Program at Johns Hopkins University. She has been teaching in the program since 1995 and currently teaches courses in the areas of American politics, American political thought, political theory, and writing and research methods. Her research and teaching interests center on democracy and civic engagement, American political thought, and family policy. She has published articles on Alexis de Tocqueville, Thomas Jefferson, Abigail Adams, and on John Locke and children’s literature.  /event/HAHWolfson
 Jul 14, 2020
 12:00 PM
The Long Journey to Women's Suffrage
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity July 14, July 14, TuesdaySponsored by the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity & Evergreen Museum & Library This three-part, virtual lecture series will explore different facets of Evergreen Museum & Library’s exterior, shedding light on how the house and its grounds changed over the course of a century. Originally constructed in 1858, the home was occupied by two generations of the wealthy Garrett family between 1878 and 1952. During its near 100 years as a private residence, the house expanded in size and scope to accommodate the needs of its residents and changing tastes in architectural and landscape design. Using photos and architectural drawings, these virtual presentations will explore those changes, the reasons for them, and their impact on the exterior aesthetics of Evergreen. Part II - An Ever-Expanding Evergreen Lori Finkelstein, the Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library, will examine the myriad expansions to Evergreen made between the early 1880s and early 1900s by the first generation of Garretts to occupy the house. Many of the “Victorian” changes were intended to support both the growing number of workers on the premises and the growing number of objects acquired by Evergreen’s owner, T. Harrison Garrett (1849-1888). Highlights will include the North Wing and porte cochère, the two-story entryway, and the famous Gold Bathroom. This event will be presented on Zoom. Please, join us for Part I: Historic Gardens and Grounds, on July 7th and for Part III: Evergreen in the 20th Century on July 21st. MEET OUR SPEAKER Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., is the Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library. Dr. Finkelstein received both her M.A. and her Ph.D. in U.S. History from New York University, and her B.A. in North American Studies from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She came to Evergreen in the spring of 2019 after a long career as a museum educator and curator at institutions including Mt. Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden in New York City, the Baltimore Museum of Industry, and the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, where she was the Vice President of Education, Interpretation, and Volunteer Programs from 2010 to 2019. Throughout her career in museums, Dr. Finkelstein has kept one foot in the classroom, teaching in Johns Hopkins’ undergraduate Program in Museums and Society and providing curricular support for the university’s online Master of Arts Program in Museum Studies. In addition, she has taught courses as an adjunct professor at Stevenson University and Seton Hall University. exteriors-at-evergreen
 Jul 14, 2020
 03:00 PM
Exteriors at Evergreen Series - Part II: An Ever-Expanding Evergreen
 Ticket Options
Free Registration
 Location
Hosted on Zoom
Baltimore, MD
YoungAlumni July 15, July 15, WednesdayThe fourth in our Young Alumni Q&A series for students & alumni. Come hear from young alumni who have been in your shoes and ask the questions you've always wanted answers to. The third session features 3 young alumni who have raised their hands to talk with students and alumni about working in fashion and retail with special emphasis on breaking into the fashion industry, ethical fashion and sourcing, and how to prepare for jobs and interviews. Please register below to receive the zoom link for the session! Featured Young Alumni: Kelly Chu - Krieger '16 Kelly Chu is currently a Global Strategy Manager at Calvin Klein, working with the merchandising, marketing, licensing, real estate, and store operations teams to create a long-term strategy plan for the global brand.  Prior to joining Calvin Klein, Kelly spent two years developing the global financial strategy and the North America Outlet e-Commerce strategy at Coach as well as two years in investment banking at J.P. Morgan.  At Hopkins, Kelly was involved with Alpha Kappa Psi, Relay For Life, and the Marshal L. Salant investment team and was the Head TA for Professor Aronhime's Financial Accounting class.   Danielle Franco - Krieger '17 Danielle Franco is the Chief Strategy Officer and founding member of TO THE MARKET.  She has been involved in helping large brands and retailers ethically source and manufacture from non-traditional suppliers in over 20 countries, including here in the United States. Danielle received her bachelor’s degree in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins University.   Marcia Zimmerman - Krieger '19 Marcia Zimmerman (A&S 2019) is a Marketing & Operations Analyst at bag brand Dagne Dover. In her role, she oversees consumer data analytics to uncover trends and help executives make better business decisions. She has been twice recognized nationally by the American Marketing Association as a top Marketing Scholar. At Hopkins, Marcia was president of Nest Strategies (JHU AMA), Chief External Affairs Officer for Kappa Alpha Theta, and studied Writing Seminars, Marketing, and Entrepreneurship. virtual-young-alumni-q-a-series-
 Jul 15, 2020
 02:00 PM
Virtual Young Alumni Q&A Series: Stories from the fashion & retail world
 Location
Baltimore, MD
SchoolofMedicine HopkinsatHomeJuly 16, July 16, ThursdayCOVID-19 changed the way in which we perceive symptoms of a sore throat, cough, and hoarseness. The concern around these symptoms as those associated with the virus, are also symptoms that many had before and may continue to experience after the worst of the pandemic. Tune in to this discussion about what we should expect going forward regarding hoarseness and cough for those who fell ill to COVID, and for those of us who did not. Learn important measures you can individually take to ensure the best for your voice health, now and in the future.  Resources related to this lecture:  American Academy of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (AAOHNS: https://www.entnet.org/ American Laryngological Association. www.ala.org Dr. Vaninder K Dhillon is a dual fellowship trained Otolaryngologist, specializing in Laryngology (voice, swallow, upper airway) and Endocrine Head and Neck Surgery (thyroid and parathyroid surgery). Originally from Northern California, Dr. Dhillon completed her medical and residency training at the University of Southern California, then completed her fellowships at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. She is currently a Johns Hopkins Otolaryngology faculty member practicing within the National Capital Region in Washington DC. Her clinical interests are in voice and swallow outcomes in thyroid and parathyroid surgery patients. Outside of work she enjoys distance running, cooking and gardening with her husband. /event/HAHCoughAfterCOVID
 Jul 16, 2020
 07:00 PM
Hoarseness and Cough after COVID: The Post-Pandemic Look at Voice Health
VirtualJuly 21, July 21, TuesdaySponsored by Lifelong Learning A wise woman once said, “What difference does it make if you have a seat at the table if you don’t effectively use it?” The literal and proverbial “seat at the table” represents your ability to have a voice in your organization and successfully influence others. Some women struggle to get to the table. Others experience challenges maximizing their seat when they get there. To expand your influence, make a bigger impact and more effectively achieve your professional goals, you need to make your voice heard. As women, however, many of us struggle to find our voices in the workplace. This webinar will show you how to examine key internal and external challenges to strive to make your voice heard, how to maximize your influence before, during and after presenting your ideas, and how to discuss actionable strategies to boost your confidence and improve your leadership presence as you engage with others. With increased confidence, communication skills and political savvy, you can maximize your seat at the table. The webinar will be presented by certified executive and leadership development coach Kim Meninger. Kim has coached hundreds of clients and has presented on career advancement and leadership topics to corporate, non-profit and academic audiences. She is especially passionate about helping women leaders to develop their confidence, visibility and influence in order to maximize their impact and advance to higher levels of leadership./event/seatattable
 Jul 21, 2020
 12:00 PM
Maximize Your Seat at the Table: Increase Your Confidence, Communication Skills and Political Savvy
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity July 21, July 21, TuesdaySponsored by the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity & Evergreen Museum & Library This three-part, virtual lecture series will explore different facets of Evergreen Museum & Library’s exterior, shedding light on how the house and its grounds changed over the course of a century. Originally constructed in 1858, the home was occupied by two generations of the wealthy Garrett family between 1878 and 1952. During its near 100 years as a private residence, the house expanded in size and scope to accommodate the needs of its residents and changing tastes in architectural and landscape design. Using photos and architectural drawings, these virtual presentations will explore those changes, the reasons for them, and their impact on the exterior aesthetics of Evergreen. Part III - Evergreen in the 20th Century Join us for a lively Q&A between Lori Finkelstein, the Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library, and Amy Kimball, Materials Manager in the Department of Special Collections at the Sheridan Libraries, as they discuss 20th-century expansions to Evergreen. Between the 1920s and 1940s, many interior and exterior alterations modernized the mansion, moving away from Victorian design and adding new spaces to accommodate John Work (1872-1942) and Alice Warder Garrett’s (1877-1952) collections of art and books. Particular attention will be paid to the work done at Evergreen during this period by noted Baltimore architect Lawrence Hall Fowler (1876-1971), whose papers reside at JHU’s Sheridan Libraries. This event will be presented on Zoom.  Please, join us for Part I: Historic Gardens and Grounds on July 7th and Part II: An Ever-Expanding Evergreen on July 14th.  MEET OUR SPEAKERS Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library, Johns Hopkins University Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., is the Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library. Dr. Finkelstein received both her M.A. and her Ph.D. in U.S. History from New York University, and her B.A. in North American Studies from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She came to Evergreen in the spring of 2019 after a long career as a museum educator and curator at institutions including Mt. Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden in New York City, the Baltimore Museum of Industry, and the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, where she was the Vice President of Education, Interpretation, and Volunteer Programs from 2010 to 2019. Throughout her career in museums, Dr. Finkelstein has kept one foot in the classroom, teaching in Johns Hopkins’ undergraduate Program in Museums and Society and providing curricular support for the university’s online Master of Arts Program in Museum Studies. In addition, she has taught courses as an adjunct professor at Stevenson University and Seton Hall University.  Amy Kimball, Materials Manager, Department of Special Collections, Sheridan Libraries, Johns Hopkins University Amy Kimball has a dual BA from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in German Literature and Art History, and an MA from Boston University in Art History. She has worked in Special Collections at the Sheridan Libraries since 1996, where her role at Evergreen Museum & Library has her working with the Laurence Hall Fowler architectural collection on a regular basis. Growing up in a (non-Fowler) house with a long history, Amy has an interest in the genealogy of residences: the people involved in building them and those who lived there. Her research on Laurence Hall Fowler has allowed her to explore these themes, both at Evergreen and beyond.evergreenexteriors
 Jul 21, 2020
 03:00 PM
Exteriors at Evergreen Series - Part III: Evergreen in the 20th Century
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFree
WomeninBusiness Affinity July 23, July 23, ThursdaySponsored by the Women of Hopkins Luci Gabel has over 20 years of advanced education and experience in business, leadership development and optimal health. She specializes in teaching leaders how to be impactful, balanced and most importantly, to model effective behavior for those they lead. In this presentation, Luci shares what sets extraordinary leaders apart from others, and identifies the critical skill set required for becoming an exceptional leader—someone who has the energy and stamina to innovate, motivate and inspire. Come learn what it takes to thrive amidst an uncertain future and master the skills needed for Leadership 3.0. This event will be held via Zoom.  Pre-order Luci's book, Eat to Lead, today!  MEET LUCI Luci Gabel,  MBA, MA, ACE, ACSM  is a Leadership Optimal Performance Coach, owner and CEO of LuciFit, LLC.  She has held leadership roles at the Department of Defense and for private companies, and has been an entrepreneur and start-up founder. She holds a Master's Degree in Business Administration (from Johns Hopkins University); a Master's Degree in Exercise Physiology with an emphasis on Genetics (University of Maryland); four years of study in Nutrition and Dietetics at the University of Maryland (accredited degree program by ACEND); and a Bachelor's Degree in Physical and Psychological Health. She combines over 20 years of academic and professional experience to empower students and clients to be healthy, well-rounded leaders. leadership-3-0-say-good-bye-to-t
 Jul 23, 2020
 03:00 PM
Leadership 3.0 - Say Good-Bye to the Old Paradigm and Lead Into the Future
 Location
Baltimore, MD
NitzeSchoolofAdvancedInternationalStudies HopkinsatHomeJuly 28, July 28, TuesdayTensions between the United States and China are on the rise, and it seems the world is entering what some experts have described as a "new type of Cold War." How should Washington respond to the geopolitical challenges posed by Beijing's rising power and influence? In particular, what difference does it make that China's economic, political, and even military footprint is growing along its western Eurasian horizon, through parts of South Asia, Central Asia, and the Middle East? Daniel Markey will lead a discussion to explore China's new policies, how Eurasian states are responding, why the region matters to the United States, and what Washington should do in response. Book Link: https://www.amazon.com/Chinas-Western-Horizon-Beijing-Geopolitics/dp/0190680199 Daniel Markey (A&S, '95) is a senior research professor at Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS). He also serves as the academic director of the SAIS Global Policy Program. He teaches courses in international politics and policy. Dr. Markey’s latest book, China’s Western Horizon: Beijing and the New Geopolitics of Eurasia, was published by Oxford University Press in March 2020. From 2007-2015, Daniel Markey was a senior fellow for India, Pakistan, and South Asia at the Council on Foreign Relations. While there, he wrote a book on the future of the U.S.-Pakistan relationship, No Exit from Pakistan: America’s Tortured Relationship with Islamabad (Cambridge University Press, 2013). From 2003 to 2007, Dr. Markey held the South Asia portfolio on the Secretary’s Policy Planning Staff at the US Department of State. Prior to government service, he taught in the Department of Politics at Princeton University. At Princeton, he also served as executive director of Princeton’s Research Program in International Security. Earlier, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard’s Olin Institute for Strategic Studies. Dr. Markey is the author of numerous reports, articles, book chapters, and opinion pieces. His commentary has been featured widely in US and international media./event/HAHMarkey
 Jul 28, 2020
 12:00 PM
Competing along China's Western Horizon
VirtualJuly 30, July 30, ThursdaySponsored by Lifelong Learning In today’s high collaboration workplace, where you must deal with people up, down, sideways, and diagonal, the Go-to Person is the closest thing to indispensable. Join talent guru and bestselling author Bruce Tulgan for a talk where he shares his guidelines on how to succeed in today’s high collaboration workplace in which lines of authority are often unclear and his insights into how to be the indispensable Go-to person. Bruce will cover how to: • Lead from wherever you are—align up and down the chain-of-command • Make good choices—learn when to say ‘no’ or ‘not yet,’ and how to say ‘yes’ • Work smart—professionalize everything you do, specialize in what you do best, and steadily expand your repertoire • Finish what you start—don’t pretend to juggle; eat one bite of the elephant, chew and swallow • Keep getting better and better at working together—it’s not personal, it’s not politics; it’s business • Be a Go-to Person, find Go-to People wherever you need them, and build up new Go-to People whenever you have the chance Bruce Tulgan is an adviser to business leaders all over the world and a sought-after keynote speaker and seminar leader. He is the founder and CEO of RainmakerThinking, Inc., a management research and training firm, as well as RainmakerLearning, an online training resource. Bruce is the best-selling author of numerous books including Not Everyone Gets a Trophy, Bridging the Soft Skills Gap, The 27 Challenges Managers Face, and It’s OK to be the Boss./event/indispensable
 Jul 30, 2020
 12:00 PM
What’s the Secret to Being Indispensable in Today’s Workplace?
 Location
Via Livestream
Baltimore, MD
SchoolofMedicine HopkinsatHomeSeptember 08, September 8, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home We’ve always known that there are important differences between women and men. But this can become particularly important when thinking about health risk factors and recovery after a life altering event like a stroke. In this livestream we will discuss some of the key differences between men and women with respect to stroke and the importance of individualizing stroke prevention strategies and recovery programs to improve long-term outcomes. For more information about Dr. Marsh's work, visit https://www.marshlab.org/.  Dr. Marsh is a board certified vascular neurologist whose research interests include post-stroke recovery and patient-centered outcomes. She received her Bachelors of Arts in Neuroscience from the Johns Hopkins University where she continued her training for medical school, neurology residency, and cerebrovascular fellowship.  She is currently an Associate Professor of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine within the Cerebrovascular Division.   Dr. Marsh’s research career began as an undergraduate when she studied recovery of language and attention in patients with acute stroke. As a resident, her interests expanded to include the acute management of stroke, and building tools to predict potential complications. She was awarded an R25 Research Training Grant through the National Institute of Health (NIH), and developed a model to quantify risk of hemorrhagic transformation in patients with acute ischemic stroke and an indication for anticoagulation. As a junior faculty member, she received a Johns Hopkins Clinician Scientist Award to further support her research efforts. She has greater than 30 peer reviewed publications in journals such as Stroke, Annals of Neurology, and the European Journal of Neurology, along with 3 book chapters, and 2 invited editorials.  In 2014, Dr. Marsh was named the Medical Director of the Stroke Program at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. She implemented the Bayview Stroke Intervention Clinic (BaSIC), a multi-disciplinary follow-up clinic designed to promote patient follow-up, reduce hospital readmission rates, and enhance post-stroke recovery. Her current focus is on the under-reported neurologic deficits (particularly with respect to depression, fatigue, and cognition) that significantly impair long-term functional outcome and patient satisfaction, despite scores on metrics such as the NIH stroke scale that indicate a “good recovery”. Her research, using magnetoencephalography (MEG) to determine the underlying pathophysiology of cognitive deficits following minor stroke, is supported by the American Heart Association and the NIH. She leads a team of vascular neurologists, emergency medicine physicians, neurosurgeons, interventional neuroradiologists, neurointensivists, and rehabilitation specialists, who work together to provide the highest level of care to all stroke patients, resulting in better functional outcomes and improved quality of life.  /event/HAHMarsh
 Sep 08, 2020
 12:00 PM
Sex Differences: Improving Stroke Recovery in Women