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January 12, January 12, TuesdayPlease join us for a one-hour Zoom webinar to hear important updates from Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute leaders. Hosted by Dr. David McConkey, our virtual Zoom series is focused on engaging the broader bladder cancer patient/family/advocacy community. The webinar format includes a 20-25-minute presentation with slides, followed by a 40-minute conversational Q & A, with the opportunity to "chat" with experts.2021-01-12 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Where Does Bladder Cancer Come From? 2021-02-16 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Decoding Bladder Cancer Pathology -- 0 -- 0 Decoding Bladder Cancer Pathology 2021-03-16 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Living with Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Living with Bladder Cancer:  When Bladder Removal is the Only Option 2021-04-06 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Depression and Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Depression and Bladder Cancer:  It’s Not Your Imagination 2021-05-25 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Living with Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Living with Bladder Cancer: Sexual Health johns-hopkins-medicine-greenberg
 Jan 12, 2021
 04:00 PM
Johns Hopkins Medicine Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute 2021 Virtual Grand Rounds
January 18, January 18, MondaySponsored by the Johns Hopkins University Office of Alumni Relations There is no time like the new year to think about healthy habits and Hop Into Wellness! We invite you to participate in a program designed to encourage wellness that contributes to overall health!  The New Year's Challenge will run from Monday, January 18th through Saturday, May 1st. At the conclusion, a prize will be awarded to the participant with the highest number of points. Additionally, every participant who records a minimum of 15 points will receive a prize.  If you would like to purchase a "Hop Into Wellness," t-shirt for $20, CLICK HERE. Don't forget to tag us @JHU_Alumni, #hopintowellness! Register Today: https://hopintowellness.challengerunner.com HOW TO REGISTER: 1. Click the link to ChallengerRunner HERE.  2. Select "Hop Into Wellness" in the right hand column as your challenge.  3. Create an account or sign into your existing account. Below, please see the activities and the associated points that may be earned: Sleep at least 7 hours = 1 point Eat a Healthy Meal = 1 point Drink 32 ounces of Water = 1 point/32 ounces Meditate for 2 Minutes = 1 point/2 min. of meditation Exercise for 20 Minutes = 1 point/20 minutes of exercise (Activities qualifying as exercise are at the discretion of the participant. For example, walking, running, swimming, cycling, yoga, pilates, barre, lifting weights, hiking, playing with your kids, etc. are all considered exercise!) For questions, contact Jamie Seward, Associate Director of Affinity Engagement Programs, at 410-218-0217 or JSeward@jhu.edu. /event/hopintowellness
 Jan 18, 2021
 12:00 AM
Hop Into Wellness: A New Year's Resolution Challenge
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Virtual January 28, January 28, ThursdayEvery year, the Johns Hopkins Alumni Association presents six categories of awards to honor outstanding alumni, faculty, and friends of Johns Hopkins. This year, our community will recognize our 2020 award recipients during our first virtual Alumni Awards Celebration. Registration for the event will be open until noon ET on January 28. If you registered before noon ET on 1/27, you will receive a link to the event on 1/27, and a reminder on 1/28. If you registered after noon ET on 1/27 but before noon ET on 1/28, you will receive a link to the event in your confirmation email and a reminder on 1/28. If you are unable to register before noon ET on 1/28, visit this site for the posted event link. Questions? If you have any questions before or during the event, please contact Marguerite Jones, Senior Director of Alumni Programs, at ingalls@jhu.edu. Community Champion Award (formerly Community Hero) Recognizes outstanding contributions that address critical social, economic and environmental needs throughout our society and communities, including local communities. Both individuals and groups are eligible. The nominee(s) may be either Johns Hopkins alumni (individual or group) who have impacted any community OR non-alumni (individual or group) who have impacted a Johns Hopkins institution. Distinguished Alumnus/Alumna Award Honors alumni who have typified the Johns Hopkins tradition of excellence and brought credit to the university by their personal accomplishment, professional achievement, or humanitarian service. Global Achievement Award Honors alumni who exemplify the Johns Hopkins tradition of excellence and have brought credit to the university and their profession in the international arena through their professional achievements or humanitarian service. Heritage Award Honors alumni and friends of Johns Hopkins who have contributed outstanding service over an extended period to the progress of the university or the activities of the Alumni Association. Outstanding Recent Graduate Award Honors recent graduates of Johns Hopkins (within 10 years of graduation) for outstanding achievement or service in their professional or volunteer life. Support of Johns Hopkins may be a consideration, but not a requirement. Distinguished Government Service Award Honors alumni who have brought credit to the university by their current or recently concluded distinguished public service as elected or appointed officials.  jhaa-award-ceremony-
 Jan 28, 2021
 07:30 PM
JHAA 2020 Awards Celebration
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Healthcare Affinity January 29, January 29, FridaySponsored by the Department of Neurology and Brain Sciences and the Healthcare Affinity Join Drs. Marilyn Albert, Mackenzie Cervenka, and Ellen Mowry as they discuss their research into how lifestyle changes can improve symptoms related to dementia, epilepsy and multiple sclerosis. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants in advance of the program.  MEET OUR SPEAKERS Marilyn S. Albert, Ph.D., Director of Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Neurology and Professor of Neurology Dr. Marilyn Albert is Professor of Neurology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is Director of the Division of Cognitive Neuroscience and Director of the Johns Hopkins Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. Over the course of her career she has conducted several large longitudinal studies aimed at improving our understanding of Alzheimer’s disease, the most recent of which is focused on the early diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. This work uses biomarkers based on imaging, cerebrospinal fluid, blood and genetics to better understand the earliest phases of AD. In addition, she has a long- standing interest in the study of lifestyle factors that influence risk of cognitive decline as people get older. Dr. Albert has authored over 300 peer-reviewed publications. She has received many awards for her contributions to AD research; most recently, the Henry Wisniewski Lifetime Achievement Award, given by the Alzheimer’s Association in 2019. Presentation: Dr. Albert will focus on memory and lifestyle factors that may preserve cognitive abilities during aging. Mackenzie Carpenter Cervenka, M.D., Director, Adult Epilepsy Diet Center, and Associate Professor of Neurology Dr. Mackenzie C. Cervenka focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of adults with seizures and epilepsy, including surgical treatment and ketogenic diet therapies. She studies the safety and effectiveness of ketogenic diet therapies for adults with epilepsy, status epilepticus, and other neurologic disorders. She also studies brain mapping in preparation for epilepsy surgery. Dr. Cervenka completed her undergraduate studies at the University of Virginia and received her medical degree from the University of Virginia School of Medicine. She then completed her internship in internal medicine and residency in neurology at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Dr. Cervenka completed a fellowship in epilepsy and clinical neurophysiology at Johns Hopkins before joining the faculty in the Neurology Department.  She is Director of the Johns Hopkins Epilepsy Monitoring Unit and the Johns Hopkins Adult Epilepsy Diet Center. Presentation: Dr. Cervenka will discuss her research on the efficacy of the popular ketogenic diet therapies in the treatment of adults with epilepsy. Ellen Mahar Mowry, M.D., Professor of Neurology Dr. Ellen Mowry is Professor of Neurology and Epidemiology at Johns Hopkins University.  She completed her undergraduate degree in biology at Georgetown University, medical school at the University of Rochester, internship and neurology residency at the University of Pennsylvania, and a fellowship in multiple sclerosis and master’s degree in clinical research at the University of California, San Francisco. Her research focuses on environmental factors that influence the risk and prognosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) as well as on improving outcome measures for use in the clinic and in clinical trials. She is also Principal Investigator (PI) or Co-PI of several investigator-initiated randomized trials. Dr. Mowry also co-directs the Johns Hopkins MS Precision Medicine Center of Excellence. Presentation: Dr. Mowry will discuss how changes in nutrition and diet, while beneficial for all, may reduce disease symptoms in people with relapsing-remitting MS.  neurological-wellness-how-health
 Jan 29, 2021
 01:00 PM
Neurological Wellness: How Healthy Habits Can Improve Your Brain
 Ticket Options
Livestream EnrollmentFree Registration
 Location
Via Livestream
Baltimore, MD
AppliedPhysicsLaboratory HopkinsatHome February 02, February 2, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome  REGISTER BELOW to tune in on Tuesday, February 2, 2021 at 12 PM ET Join Dr. Nour Raouafi as he shares the journey of the Parker Solar Probe and how the data collected impacts us on Earth. The Parker Solar Probe will get as close as 3.8 million miles from the solar surface, that almost 4% of the Sun-Earth distance (i.e., 93 million miles) and on Jan. 21, the spacecraft transmitted a “tone one,” indicating all systems were healthy and operating normally after the spacecraft’s close approach to the Sun and heading into the final stretch of the solar encounter, which runs through Jan. 23. Now just over two years into its seven-year mission, the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft will eventually travel within 4 million miles of the Sun’s surface. It is primarily an exploration mission, and the data returned so far is a treasure trove that holds the potential for breakthrough discoveries. Parker is breaking new boundaries of space exploration by flying halfway between Mercury and the Sun. It is writing a new chapter of space research by revolutionizing our understanding of this mysterious region by answering long-standing questions that puzzled scientists for decades: how the solar wind plasma is heated and accelerated and solar energetic particles accelerated and transported throughout the heliosphere. The analyses of science data show new phenomena and plasma properties not seen before in the solar wind. Tune in to learn about the major, mystifying discoveries that have been made so far, and the upcoming solar encounters.  Nour Raouafi is an Astrophysicist and a Senior Scientist at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory. He is currently the Project Scientist of NASA's Parker Solar Probe mission, which launched on August 12, 2018, and is the record holder of the closest human-made object to a star (i.e., the Sun) and also the fastest spacecraft. He is a Ph.D. in Astrophysics (University of Paris XI, Orsay, France; Dec. 2000). Before joining the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in 2008, Dr. Raouafi worked at the Turin Observatory (Italy, 2001), the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (Göttingen, Germany 2002-2005) and the National Solar Observatory (Tucson, Arizona: 2005-2008). His research spreads over a wide range of solar and heliospheric areas with an emphasis on the dynamic solar corona via the analysis of spectral and imaging observations, theory, and modeling. He contributed to diverse research areas, e.g., solar magnetic fields, spectroscopy, polarimetry, coronal plumes and jets, CMEs and coronal shock waves, solar wind, solar energetic particles, and cometary physics. He authored and co-authored tens of peer-reviewed papers and meeting proceedings.swinging-around-the-sun-with-the
 Feb 02, 2021
 12:00 PM
Swinging around the Sun with the Parker Solar Probe: Mission and Milestone with Nour Raouafi
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
FederalGovernment Affinity February 03, February 3, WednesdaySponsored by the Federal Government Affinity Hundreds of millions of dollars are offered each year to provide funding, training, and coaching to support businesses with new technologies. Frequently, small to mid-sized businesses miss these opportunities due to the knowledge gap between the funding entities within the federal government that want to support innovators and the eligible business providing new, existing, and promising technology. Join federal business development expert Amy Hoang Wrona (A&S '96, SAIS '97) as she shares insider tips on how to access government programs and organizations that can provide your business with the tools to accelerate and commercialize your innovations. Dr. Ernesto Chanona (A&S '08) will be our guest moderator. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants in advance of the program.  MEET OUR SPEAKER Amy Hoang Wrona (A&S ´96, SAIS ´97), Principal, Alethia Consulting & Director of Business Development, SNA International Amy Hoang Wrona has been working in Federal government contracting for 18 years after spending the first five years of her career in management consulting at KPMG and McKinsey. She has worked with several Federal contractors, most recently assisting a company secure private equity funding after helping to grow revenues from the hundreds of thousands to the tens of millions over the course of 4 years.  Over the last five years, she has helped small companies achieve explosive growth and large companies win federal contracts worth hundreds of millions of dollars. In this time, she has helped three clients win nearly a billion dollars in US federal contracts.  MEET OUR MODERATOR Ernesto Chanona, Ph.D. (A&S '08), Acting Director, Office of BioHealth and Life Sciences, Maryland Department of Commerce & Adjunct Professor, Johns Hopkins University, Center for Biotechnology Education Ernesto leads the economic development of the biotechnology and medtech sectors for the State of Maryland. He is also an Adjunct Professor at the Johns Hopkins University, Center for Biotechnology Education. He trained as a cancer immunologist, who worked in the pre-clinical development of immunotherapies at the National Cancer Institute. As a business and innovation development expert, Ernesto helps local and international companies overcome challenges in commercialization. These include obtaining funding, real estate, academic research partners, federal lab innovations, connections to local CXOs, exports, and overcoming issues with international government agencies. Ernesto is also a biotechnology supply chain expert. His primary research interests include the growth, structure and dynamics of biotechnology hubs. By analyzing the relationships between the stakeholders in industry, the output of biotechnology talent pipelines, the priorities of government agencies, and the appetite of investment community, he develops local and international strategies that best foster the growth of industry. He regularly presents Maryland's efforts in webinars to trade partners including Korea, the U.K., Canada, Australia, and Japan, to foster the foreign direct investment of companies seeking to expand into the U.S. market.how-to-use-federal-government-pr
 Feb 03, 2021
 12:00 PM
How to Use Federal Government Programs to Accelerate Your Innovation
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity February 03, February 3, WednesdaySponsored by the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra and the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet and Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story show each of these composers at their melodic and dramatic best. The tale, predating Shakespeare, of “star-crossed lovers” caught in the throes of vengeful violence is unfortunately as modern now as ever.  We will discuss these works in the context of Shakespeare and watch HSO’s performance from December 2014. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with registrants in advance of the program. Don't miss our other programs in our series of Evenings with the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra! March 3rd - Exquisite Revolution: Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto  April 7th - Bloodlust: Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring  May 19th - Powerful Works of Our Time: Sanchez-Guitierrez's Girando Danzando and Dusman's What Remains Please, register for each program individually. Click HERE to learn more about the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra. MEET OUR SPEAKERS Gerrad Alex Taylor (A&S '10), Actor, Director, and Teaching Artist; Associate Artistic Director, Chesapeake Shakespeare Company Gerrad Alex Taylor is an actor, director, and teaching artist. Gerrad is Associate Artistic Director and resident acting company member with the Chesapeake Shakespeare Company He also directs at the Children's Theatre of Annapolis and is an actor and teaching artist with the Shakespeare Festival St. Louis. He received his B.A. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University and his MFA in Performance from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Dr. Jed Gaylin, Music Director, Hopkins Symphony Orchestra As Music Director, Dr. Jed Gaylin leads the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra (HSO), the Bay Atlantic Symphony, and Two Rivers Chambers Orchestra. He has been the Music Director of the HSO since 1993 during which time the orchestra has grown in size, prominence, and artistry into one of the country’s most accomplished university orchestras. The high standards of the orchestra and Jed’s belief in art’s ability to knit together and ignite new energy in our communities have resulted in collaborations with arts groups throughout Baltimore City, as well as with other non-profit and civic organizations. Dr. Gaylin earned both a Bachelor of Music in piano and as Master of Music in conducting at the Oberlin Conservatory, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended the Aspen Music Festival as a Conducting Fellow. Dr. Gaylin makes music with spirit and intellect, soul and rigor, a deep knowledge of world cultures, human nature, and the arts – that is, with his whole being. His approach to music, musicians, and life is rare; an old world commitment to the study and depth of conception, combined with a welcoming presence and warm engagement – both on and off the podium. To learn more about Dr. Jed Gaylin, please visit his website - https://jedgaylin.com/hso
 Feb 03, 2021
 07:00 PM
Hopkins Symphony Orchestra Evenings Part I - Star-Crossed: Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet and Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story
 Ticket Options
Alumni & Guests$10
StudentsFREE
Affinity February 04, February 4, ThursdaySponsored by the SAIS Women's Alumnae Network NY and the Women of Hopkins NY Join the SAIS Women's Alumnae Network (SWAN) NY for a three-part workshop to learn about different kinds of meditation and how they can positively impact your personal and professional life. These meditations will focus on tuning into the body, cultivating gratitude, and anchoring into resilience. These powerful tools can be incorporated into your daily routine, leading not only to greater personal well-being and satisfaction, but to a more connected, compassionate and thoughtful approach to the challenges we face in our world.  SWAN NY is pleased to welcome instructor Abigail Somma (SAIS '02), who will lead us through a virtual meditation practice each week and share methods to apply these concepts to your daily work and life. Participants will have the chance to connect with other Hopkins alumni, both before and after the meditations, in breakout groups.  This event will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with registrants in advance of the event. Please, join us for Part II - Gratitude: Developing a Mind of Appreciation on February 11th and for Part III - Resilience: Cultivating Equanimity in the Face of Challenge on February 18th. You will need to register for each part of the series individually. Thank you!  ABOUT MINDFULNESS AND MEDITATION One simple definition of mindfulness is "being present" with whatever arises with a sense of kindness and curiosity. It sounds simple, but learning to settle and focus the mind can be extremely powerful. During the unprecedented challenges we face as a global community, many people are turning to mindfulness and other types of meditation as constructive tools for enhanced well-being and focus. Multiple studies have shown that mindfulness and meditation support increased self-awareness, better ability to manage emotions and greater attention control. Long-term practitioners also report better decision-making and creativity, while employers claim that mindfulness programs lead to a more engaged and satisfied workforce. In recent years, mindfulness programs have become a staple in many companies. As of 2016, 22% of companies (including Google, Aetna, General Mills, LinkedIn, etc) had active programs and interest continues to rise. Mindfulness in the workplace has also made it into public institutions like the British Parliament, the US Congress and the Bhutanese Civil Service.  MEET OUR INSTRUCTOR Abigail (Abbie) Somma (SAIS '02) Abigail Somma (Abbie) offers coaching and training in mindfulness and emotional intelligence. She works with individuals and organizations, optimizing results by creating more connected, engaged and creative workplaces. Ms. Somma has facilitated for groups in Vienna, New York, London and Bratislava, and has teacher-training certificates from the Nalanda Institute of Contemplative Science (NYC) and Search Inside Yourself (San Francisco). While she believes institutions have a role in promoting peace, she has come to believe that peace comes to the world one person at a time. Please find more information at www.themindfulgoods.commindfulness-series-part-i-the-bo
 Feb 04, 2021
 08:00 AM
Mindfulness Series Part I - The Body Scan: Tuning Into the Body and Its Signals
 Ticket Options
Alumni & Guest FREE
SOBA Affinity February 09, February 9, TuesdaySponsored by Johns Hopkins Alumni Association, Society of Black Alumni, Offices of Diversity and Inclusion and Homewood Dean of Student Life and the Black Staff and Faculty Association Please join Dr. Katrina Caldwell, Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer, and alumnus Wes Moore ’01, Rhodes Scholar, New York Times bestselling author, Army combat veteran, social entrepreneur, and Robin Hood’s Chief Executive Officer, for a fireside chat. Their dynamic conversation will focus on Moore’s life’s work—combating poverty and wealth inequity, how to channel personal passion and commitment into action, and how to be resilient. MEET OUR SPEAKERS Wes Moore A&S '01,Chief Executive Officer, Robin Hood Wes Moore is the Chief Executive Officer of Robin Hood, one of the largest anti-poverty forces in the nation. He is a bestselling author, a combat veteran, and a social entrepreneur.     Wes’ first book, “The Other Wes Moore,” a perennial New York Times bestseller, captured the nation’s attention on the fine line between success and failure in our communities and in ourselves. That story has been optioned by executive producer Oprah Winfrey and HBO to be made into a movie. He is also the author of the bestselling books “The Work,” “Discovering Wes Moore,” “This Way Home” and the recently released, “Five Days.”    Wes grew up in Baltimore and the Bronx, where he was raised by a single mom. Despite childhood challenges, he graduated Phi Theta Kappa from Valley Forge Military College in 1998 and Phi Beta Kappa from Johns Hopkins University in 2001. He earned an MLitt in International Relations from Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar in 2004. Wes then served as a captain and paratrooper with the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division, including a combat deployment to Afghanistan. He later served as a White House Fellow to Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.    Before becoming CEO at Robin Hood, Wes was the founder and CEO at BridgeEdU, an education platform based in Baltimore addressing the college completion and job placement crisis by reinventing freshman year for underserved students. BridgeEdU was acquired by Edquity, a Brooklyn-based student financial success and emergency aid firm, in June 2019.     Wes has also worked in finance as an investment banker with Deutsche Bank in London and with Citigroup in New York.     Wes lives in Baltimore with his wife and two children. Dr. Katrina Caldwell, Vice Provost for Diversity and Inclusion and Chief Diversity Officer Katrina Caldwell, Ph.D joined Johns Hopkins University as the Chief Diversity Officer (CDO) on July 1, 2020. In her role at CDO Dr. Caldwell will serve as the primary steward of the Roadmap on Diversity and Inclusion, align D&I initiatives with university priorities, and coordinate and collaborate with the university’s divisions on D&I matters. Dr. Caldwell will also serve as the ex officio co-chair of the Diversity Leadership Council, alongside Ashley Llorens, Chief of Intelligent Systems Center at the Applied Physics Laboratory and chair of the Diversity Leadership Council. Dr. Caldwell has more than 26 years of progressive leadership experience in higher education, with a focus on strategic planning and implementation. Dr. Caldwell holds a Ph.D and master’s degree from the University of Illinois at Chicago and a bachelor’s degree from Spelman College. Prior to accepting the role of CDO at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Caldwell served as University of Mississippi’s first vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement beginning for three years, beginning in 2017. As vice chancellor for diversity and community engagement Dr. Caldwell lead University of Mississippi’s efforts to create a diverse and welcoming environment, building an infrastructure to increase community engagement, and targeting high impact areas for transformation.    race-matters-virtual-fireside-ch
 Feb 09, 2021
 06:30 PM
R.A.C.E. Matters Speaker Series
 Ticket Options
Mini-Course EnrollmentFree Registration
 Location
Via Livestream
Baltimore, MD
SheridanLibraries HopkinsatHome February 10, February 10, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome February 10, 2021 - February 24, 2021 (3 sessions) Wednesdays, 12 - 1pm  May your heart be your guide as Sheridan Libraries staff showcase their favorite love-themed collections and teach you how to recreate historic letter-writing techniques. In this three- part mini-course, you will sample some vintage love songs from the Lester Levy Collection of Popular American Sheet Music, learn about the history of Valentine’s Day cards, and have the chance to create your very own “locking letters” as a Valentine’s Day treat. Week 1, February 10, with Heidi Herr The valentine card as we know it today was popularized in the 1840s, giving the besotted and lovelorn alike a chance to find their perfect match in Cupid’s mailbag.  Librarian Heidi Herr will talk about the history of some of her favorite valentines in Special Collections, including 19th century hand-cut tokens of love, vinegar (or “poison”) valentines, and the secret correspondence of a 1930s sailor and his favorite gal! Week 2, February 17, with Jennifer Jarvis Locking Letters: an introduction and demonstration of historic techniques for securing information. The term “letterlocking” refers to the process by which letters, in this case on paper, were folded and secured in order to prevent the information contained within falling into unintended hands. In use from the late Middle Ages, these techniques were commonplace among the nobility and those working for them, as well as the general public. Conservator Jennifer Jarvis will briefly discuss the history of these documents before demonstrating how to make your own locked letters, which make perfect secret Valentines!  Week 3, February 24, with Sam Bessen The Levy Sheet Music Collection is the product of decades of love. Between the  purchase of a dozen songs for fifty cents each, to the dramatic purchase of a first edition of the Star Spangled Banner, Lester Levy dedicated his life to his collection and his love of history. In this lecture, Assistant Curator Sam Bessen will explore the love of  collecting through Levy’s writings and correspondence, and share some love songs from the collection.  Heidi Herr, outreach librarian for Special Collections, creates programs and learning activities that engage Johns Hopkins students in conducting research with primary sources. She is also the librarian for the English and Philosophy departments. Heidi teaches courses on a wide variety of topics, including fortune-telling board games and the development of the cookbook, and oversees the Sheridan Libraries’ Freshman Fellowship program. She holds MA degrees in English and Library Science from the University of Maryland, College Park.   Jennifer Jarvis has an MA in Conservation Studies from the College of West Dean, University of Sussex, and a diploma in Bookbinding from the North Bennet Street School in Boston, MA. From 2008-2011 she was the Project Director/Chief Conservator for the Derry & Raphoe Diocesan Library Project in Northern Ireland and has since held positions at Columbia University and the Smithsonian. She has been a book and paper conservator at the Sheridan Libraries since 2015.   Sam Bessen, a native of Phoenix, Arizona, is Assistant Curator of the Lester S. Levy Sheet Music Collection at Johns Hopkins University’s Sheridan Libraries. With a background in music performance, Sam completed his Master’s degree at the Peabody Conservatory in 2017. Sam is also the Founder and Artistic Director of the In the Stacks series at the George Peabody Library, named by Baltimore Magazine as one of eleven local institutions making classical music relevant in the 21st century. His programs have included explorations of ancient sculpture, neoclassical architecture, immersive theater, queer silent film, immersive theater, and research into university archives to uncover previously unheard works by women and African American composers.      love-at-the-library
 Feb 10, 2021
 12:00 PM
Love at the Library
 Ticket Options
Alumni & Guests$10
StudentsFREE
Affinity February 11, February 11, ThursdaySponsored by the SAIS Women's Alumnae Network NY and the Women of Hopkins NY Join the SAIS Women's Alumnae Network (SWAN) NY for a three-part workshop to learn about different kinds of meditation and how they can positively impact your personal and professional life. These powerful tools can be incorporated into your daily routine, leading not only to greater personal well-being and satisfaction, but to a more connected, compassionate and thoughtful approach to the challenges we face in our world.  SWAN NY is pleased to welcome instructor Abigail Somma (SAIS '02), who will lead us through a virtual meditation practice each week and share methods to apply these concepts to your daily work and life. Participants will have the chance to connect with other Hopkins alumni, both before and after the meditations, in breakout groups.  This event will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with registrants in advance of the event. Please, join us for Part I - The Body Scan: Tuning into the Body and Its Signals on February 4th and for Part III - Resilience: Cultivating Equanimity in the Face of Challenge on February 18th. You will need to register for each part of the series individually. Thank you!  ABOUT MINDFULNESS AND MEDITATION One simple definition of mindfulness is "being present" with whatever arises with a sense of kindness and curiosity. It sounds simple, but learning to settle and focus the mind can be extremely powerful. During the unprecedented challenges we face as a global community, many people are turning to mindfulness and other types of meditation as constructive tools for enhanced well-being and focus. Multiple studies have shown that mindfulness and meditation support increased self-awareness, better ability to manage emotions and greater attention control. Long-term practitioners also report better decision-making and creativity, while employers claim that mindfulness programs lead to a more engaged and satisfied workforce. In recent years, mindfulness programs have become a staple in many companies. As of 2016, 22% of companies (including Google, Aetna, General Mills, LinkedIn, etc) had active programs and interest continues to rise. Mindfulness in the workplace has also made it into public institutions like the British Parliament, the US Congress and the Bhutanese Civil Service.  MEET OUR INSTRUCTOR Abigail (Abbie) Somma (SAIS '02) Abigail Somma (Abbie) offers coaching and training in mindfulness and emotional intelligence. She works with individuals and organizations, optimizing results by creating more connected, engaged and creative workplaces. Ms. Somma has facilitated for groups in Vienna, New York, London and Bratislava, and has teacher-training certificates from the Nalanda Institute of Contemplative Science (NYC) and Search Inside Yourself (San Francisco). While she believes institutions have a role in promoting peace, she has come to believe that peace comes to the world one person at a time. Please find more information at www.themindfulgoods.commindfulness-series-part-ii-grati
 Feb 11, 2021
 08:00 AM
Mindfulness Series Part II - Gratitude: Developing a Mind of Appreciation
 Ticket Options
Alumni and GuestFree
 Location
Virtual
BALTIMORE, MD
BloombergSchoolofPublicHealth Virtual February 16, February 16, TuesdayAdvocacy and Policy Efforts to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse Child sexual abuse impacts 12% of the world’s children. The effects of abuse are profound and include increased risk for physical health, mental health, and behavioral health problems. While many organizations that support victims of child sexual abuse begin their efforts after abuse has already occurred, the Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse focuses on preventing abuse from occurring. Research at the Moore Center involves developing, validating, and disseminating effective prevention programs, including programs that focus on helping people who might offend against children to avoid doing so. The Moore Center’s education and communication efforts focus on conveying that child sexual abuse is preventable, not inevitable, and their advocacy and policy efforts focus ensure that policy makers include prevention as a substantial component of comprehensive efforts to address child sexual abuse. Join Elizabeth Letourneau, PhD, as she presents on recent research conducted by the Moore Center on continued prevention of child sexual abuse.   Elizabeth Letourneau, PhD is Professor in the Department of Mental Health, and Director of the Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.  For more than 30 years, she has developed, evaluated, and implemented policies and practices that aim to prevent the onset of sexual offending.  Dr. Letourneau has led dozens of research projects resulting in more than 80 scientific publications which establish an empirical basis for perpetration prevention efforts that work.  In addition, Letourneau has helped develop and evaluate state and national sex crime policies.  Her research on juvenile sex offender registration established the inefficacy and harmfulness of such policies and was influential in several U.S. state supreme court cases and in U.S. state legislatures that revised their registration policies.  For this work, Letourneau was awarded the inaugural Faculty Practice Award in 2017 by Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.preventing-abuse1
 Feb 16, 2021
 01:00 PM
Advocacy and Policy Efforts to Prevent Child Sexual Abuse
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Healthcare Affinity February 17, February 17, WednesdaySponsored by the Healthcare Affinity The environmental crisis is, in reality, a spiritual crisis born of our disconnection and separation from the natural world from which we evolved, and that sustains us and gifts us all we need to thrive. When we connect to our hearts, bodies and the natural world, our words and actions become more authentic and have more integrity. In order to have integrity and honor the natural world, our actions have to match our words. We have to walk the walk.  Join us and learn how to make changes, big and small, that count. These things count and matter. Invite others to join you in making these essential changes. Let’s start an avalanche of change that can’t be denied or reversed. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants and posted on this website in advance of the program.  MEET OUR SPEAKER Skye Raiser (SAIS '93), Founder & CEO, Green Up Your Life, LLC Skye has been an environmentalist all her life. Over the past 15 years, she has studied the sources of human low-level exposure to toxins and chemicals that we all encounter through our food, cosmetics, beauty supplies, and home furnishings and décor. She was particularly compelled to investigate when she faced personal health issues that regular doctors could not identify nor treat. Skye talked with toxicologists, read scientific studies, studied food systems, agricultural methods, ecology, and worked with and drew knowledge from organizations such as the Environmental Working Group, the Nature Conservancy, DC Greens, Project Drawdown, and others. She believes in the purchase power of people to change the market, our products, and the world. She holds a BA from the University of Virginia, a MA from Johns Hopkins University, and has an executive degree from Columbia University’s Earth Institute Center for Environmental Sustainability with a concentration on Food Systems. Skye is an urban farmer, growing dozens of species of fruits, vegetables, and herbs at her home in Washington, DC. She considers herself a Multi-Species Herd Manager, taking care of 3 kids, 3 dogs, and 3 horses. Connect with Skye and Green Up Your Life: Email - Skye@greenupyour.life Instagram - @greenupyourlife Facebook - @greenupco Website - greenupyour.life MEET OUR MODERATOR Jessica Bast, Sustainability Outreach Coordinator, JHU's Office of Sustainability Jessica manages engagement and educational programs for students, faculty, and staff that focus on strengthening participation in sustainability initiatives and general understanding of sustainability principles. Her passion for sustainability sparked early on, guiding her to graduate from Elon University with a B.A. in Environmental Studies and from the University of Pennsylvania with a Master’s in Environmental Studies, where she conducted her capstone research in collaboration with Penn’s Sustainability Office.  green-up-your-life-learn-practic
 Feb 17, 2021
 12:00 PM
Green Up Your Life:  Learn Practical Action Items for Living a Greener, Less Toxic Life for You, Your Family, and Our Planet
 Ticket Options
Alumni & Guests$10
StudentsFREE
Affinity February 18, February 18, ThursdaySponsored by the SAIS Women's Alumnae Network NY and the Women of Hopkins NY Join the SAIS Women's Alumnae Network (SWAN) NY for a three-part workshop to learn about different kinds of meditation and how they can positively impact your personal and professional life. These powerful tools can be incorporated into your daily routine, leading not only to greater personal well-being and satisfaction, but to a more connected, compassionate and thoughtful approach to the challenges we face in our world.  SWAN NY is pleased to welcome instructor Abigail Somma (SAIS '02), who will lead us through a virtual meditation practice each week and share methods to apply these concepts to your daily work and life. Participants will have the chance to connect with other Hopkins alumni, both before and after the meditations, in breakout groups.  This event will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with registrants in advance of the event. Please, join us for Part I - The Body Scan: Tuning into the Body and Its Signals on February 4th and for Part II - Mindfulness Series Part II - Gratitude: Developing a Mind of Appreciation on February 11th. You will need to register for each part of the series individually. Thank you!  ABOUT MINDFULNESS AND MEDITATION One simple definition of mindfulness is "being present" with whatever arises with a sense of kindness and curiosity. It sounds simple, but learning to settle and focus the mind can be extremely powerful. During the unprecedented challenges we face as a global community, many people are turning to mindfulness and other types of meditation as constructive tools for enhanced well-being and focus. Multiple studies have shown that mindfulness and meditation support increased self-awareness, better ability to manage emotions and greater attention control. Long-term practitioners also report better decision-making and creativity, while employers claim that mindfulness programs lead to a more engaged and satisfied workforce. In recent years, mindfulness programs have become a staple in many companies. As of 2016, 22% of companies (including Google, Aetna, General Mills, LinkedIn, etc) had active programs and interest continues to rise. Mindfulness in the workplace has also made it into public institutions like the British Parliament, the US Congress and the Bhutanese Civil Service.  MEET OUR INSTRUCTOR Abigail (Abbie) Somma (SAIS '02) Abigail Somma (Abbie) offers coaching and training in mindfulness and emotional intelligence. She works with individuals and organizations, optimizing results by creating more connected, engaged and creative workplaces. Ms. Somma has facilitated for groups in Vienna, New York, London and Bratislava, and has teacher-training certificates from the Nalanda Institute of Contemplative Science (NYC) and Search Inside Yourself (San Francisco). While she believes institutions have a role in promoting peace, she has come to believe that peace comes to the world one person at a time. Please find more information at www.themindfulgoods.commindfulness-series-part-iii-resi
 Feb 18, 2021
 08:00 AM
Mindfulness Series Part III - Resilience: Cultivating Equanimity in the Face of Challenge
 Ticket Options
Livestream EnrollmentFree Registration
 Location
Via Livestream
Baltimore, MD
PeabodyConservatory HopkinsatHome February 23, February 23, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome REGISTER BELOW to tune in on February, 23, 2021 at 12 PM ET The performing arts industry has been thoroughly upended by the COVID-19 pandemic, with venues shut down, performances canceled, and artists out of work. A Brookings Institution report issued last summer estimated the damage in the fine and performing arts at almost 1.4 million jobs and $42.5 billion in sales lost. On February 10, the Peabody Institute convened arts industry leaders from around the country to explore the path forward for artists and organizations and the long-term, post-COVID landscape for the performing arts. Key questions addressed included: What does the future look like? Will audiences come back? How will the experience of the arts have changed after COVID? Facing these and other pressures, how will performing artists and institutions adapt? In this session, Dean Bronstein will share key takeaways for a re-invented future for the performing arts industry. The moderator will be Sarah Hoover, Associate Dean for Innovation, Interdisciplinary Partnerships and Community Initiatives at the Peabody Institute. This livestream has been tagged by Common Question. Find out more here.  Dean Fred Bronstein, DMA, an accomplished pianist, dedicated music educator, and successful chief executive of American symphony orchestras – was appointed the first dean of the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University on June 1, 2014. During his first term Bronstein instituted a comprehensive, five-year Breakthrough Plan to focus the administration on strategic goals and improving the school's financial stability, a process that was renewed in 2019-2020. Under his leadership, Peabody adopted a new curriculum that redefines the education model for aspiring artists, preparing them for 21st-century careers. The school also launched two innovative academic programs in 2018—in dance and in music for new media—which helped increase the school's applications and enrollment.  Bronstein has led Peabody in establishing ties with other Hopkins schools and with Baltimore community programs to bring performance and arts education beyond the halls of the conservatory. He helped establish the Johns Hopkins Center for Music and Medicine, and its affiliate, the Johns Hopkins Rehabilitation Network Clinic for Performing Artists at Peabody is the first of its kind on a music school campus. Bronstein has also been an advocate for equity and inclusion and has been outspoken in his belief that attracting new and diverse audiences is necessary to ensure the future success of the performing arts industry. Prior to joining Peabody, Bronstein served as president of several orchestras, including the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra, Omaha Symphony, and Dallas Symphony Orchestra. As a performer, Bronstein toured for eight years and could be heard on New World Records as part of Aequalis, a chamber group he co-founded with a focus on new American music, innovative programming, and educational outreach. He received his Doctor of Musical Arts degree from the State University of New York, Stony Brook. Sarah Hoover, DMA '08, as Associate Dean for Innovation, Interdisciplinary Partnerships and Community Initiatives at the Peabody Institute, has re-invigorated the institute’s historic engagement with organizations throughout Baltimore to bring music to new audiences and help students hone citizen artistry and career skills. She has shepherded the development of Peabody’s Breakthrough Curriculum and oversees the work of Peabody LAUNCHPad and the Office of Community Partnerships, advancing an integrated vision for career skill development, entrepreneurship and citizen artistry. Prior to her appointment at Peabody, Hoover had a career as a performer, teacher of singing, and music journalist. Her writing has been published by the Washington Post, Baltimore Sun, Grove Dictionary of American Music, and Chamber Music magazine. From 2012 to 2015, she founded and directed the Oyster Bay Music Festival in Oyster Bay, NY, a grassroots experiment in community music that deconstructed the concert stage and broke down the boundaries between audience and performers. Hoover is a graduate of Yale University and earned a Doctor of Musical Arts in Vocal Performance from the Peabody Institute. She received additional training in voice science and holds certificates in Arts in Medicine and Performing Arts Medicine.the-next-normal-reflections-on-a
 Feb 23, 2021
 12:00 PM
The Next Normal: Reflections on Arts, Innovation, and Resilience in a Post-COVID World
 Ticket Options
Mini-Course EnrollmentFree Registration
 Location
Zoom
Baltimore, MD
PeabodyConservatory HopkinsatHome February 24, February 24, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome February 24, 2021 - March 24, 2021 (5 weeks) Wednesdays, 5:30 PM - 6:30 PM EST Indigenous North Americans were surprised to discover Spanish, French and British explorers on their shores in the 1500s– and from the outset some were taught, believe it or not, to sing the Catholic Mass in Latin. But the story of American music soon includes British influence, and along with the other cultures mentioned, it was music of the enslaved from Africa that would co-mingle and flavor the music evolving in North America. This course examines how Native, European and African cultural materials come to play in all sorts of music -- sacred and secular, commercial and freely played, urban and rural, amateur and professional. Materials presented in these classes span the two centuries after Jamestown’s establishment and include plenty of live and recorded musical performances as well as rich, lovely images and relevant videos.  Throughout these sessions we will explore and discuss the functions of music: ritual and worship, dance, oral history and story-telling, warring and protest, theater, and sheer entertainment. This broad, rich history includes ballads, spiritual and other songs, marches, dances, psalm- and hymn-singing and both commercial and classical expressions. Each of our five sessions will allow for interaction and question-driven discussion, plus some optional homework. Week 1 - Overview – peoples of North America, Spain, France, England and Africa - a listening tour and comparison of what they bring to bear in America Week 2 - Colonial Music, Sacred and Secular – how do the black and white hear each other? Week 3 - Revolution & Constitution – the rise of the music business: theater, tavern, dancing assembly, and private home... how separated are the races, really? Week 4 - From Fort McHenry to blackface minstrelsy to Hiawatha commercialization of the American story and the rise of elite classicism Week 5 - 1850-1900 – assimilation through sheet music, opera and the concert stage Links to resources related to this topic:  www.colonialmusic.org - Our original website, now hosted by Mount Vernon.  Resources sections especially useful are the PACAN (newspaper) database, and the songster database www.musicalpassage.org - Pages from early 18th-c book including African music transcribed in 1688 in Jamaica; links to audio recordings on proper instruments, lots of other good background https://levysheetmusic.mse.jhu.edu/ More than 30,000 pieces of sheet music - amazing way to teach about technology, abolition, politics, gender issues, etc. over a LONG stretch of time. https://www.americanantiquarian.org/thomasballads/ - Hundreds of high-res pix of ballads printed in 1813 in Boston but covering lots of history back a half-century also; includes detailed descriptions, essays, and many now with audio recordings https://www.mym-media.org/portfolio.html - Scroll down to 4th screen, “A New Song - The Governor’s Rout” -the story of a recently discovered 235-year-old song from Annapolis, Maryland https://www.mountvernon.org/library/digitalhistory/digital-encyclopedia/article/francis-hopkinson/ - Scroll down for harpsichord demo, afterwards search for "Bullfinch" article about Martha's music book David K. Hildebrand (Ph.D. musicology, 1992) is a freelance performer, lecturer, recording artist, and faculty member of the musicology department at the Peabody Conservatory. His scholarly work and performances focus on early American music. For more than 20 years he served as the Director of The Colonial Music Institute. In 2012 David produced and narrated a one-hour national public radio special, “Music of the War of 1812” and served as the lead music historian for the nationally broadcast documentary film, "Anthem," the story behind “The Star-Spangled Banner.” He has written reviews and reader reports for The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, American Music, and Oxford University Press.  Johns Hopkins University Press published his book Musical Maryland in 2017. He has appeared on C-SPAN television, "History Detectives," NPR and BBC radio.  David was a Research Fellow at the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon, both during 2016-2017 and 2020-21. David and his wife Ginger Hildebrand have been performing together professionally since 1980, and they have recorded and produced seven full-length CD recordings. This is David’s second Hopkins at Home course, previously presenting “Musical Maryland - from Colonial Times through the mid-20th Century.” Follow Dr. Hildebrand on LinkedIn here.american-music-before-1900-the-n
 Feb 24, 2021
 05:30 PM
American Music Before 1900 - the Native, the European, and the African
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Affinity February 25, February 25, ThursdaySponsored by the Real Estate & Blockchain and FinTech Affinities Blockchain technology is most simply defined as a decentralized, distributed ledger that records the provenance of a digital asset. This revolutionary technology helps reduce risk, stamps out fraud, and brings transparency in a scaleable way for myriad uses. Join Katherine Pinkard (Business '14) as she explains what it is, how its used, and its history. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with event registrants and posted on this website in advance of the program.  MEET OUR SPEAKER Katherine Pinkard (Business '14), President, Pinkard Properties Representing the fourth generation of Pinkards in the commercial real estate industry as the Co-Founder and President of Pinkard Properties, Ms. Pinkard oversees the commercial real estate services firm, providing property management, development, project management, and advisory services. Since founding the company in 2012, she has worked with clients ranging from local real estate owners and developers, to publicly-traded REITs, as well as large public companies, public institutions, and government agencies to manage and consult on an array of assignments. Ms. Pinkard holds an MBA from the Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School and a BA from Georgetown University.  Ms. Pinkard currently serves as a member of the Dean’s Alumni Advisory Board of the Johns Hopkins University Carey Business School where she chairs the Philanthropy Committee.    what-is-blockchain-and-how-does-
 Feb 25, 2021
 12:00 PM
What is Blockchain and How Does It Work?
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity March 03, March 3, WednesdaySponsored by the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra and the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity Mendelssohn is erroneously known as a conservative composer. Yet, his orchestral works such as this concerto, or the “Italian” Symphony, Midsummer Night’s Dream, or The Hebrides burst with imagination in effect, form, and feel. We will discuss the violin concerto and watch HSO’s performance with Amy Beth Horman, violin, from December 2014. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with registrants in advance of the program. Don't miss our other programs in our series of Evenings with the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra! February 3rd - Star-Crossed: Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet and Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story  April 7th - Bloodlust: Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring  May 19th - Powerful Works of Our Time: Sanchez-Guitierrez's Girando Danzando and Dusman's What Remains Please, register for each program individually. Click HERE to learn more about the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra. MEET OUR SPEAKERS Amy Beth Horman, Violinist A passionate teacher and performer, Amy Beth Horman has enjoyed an active solo career as soloist and recitalist throughout the US and Europe. She made her debut with the National Symphony at age 15 performing the Tchaikovsky Concerto. Ms. Horman is on faculty of the Pre-College program at the San Francisco Conservatory of Music. Ms. Horman is also the creator and host of “Beyond the Triangle," a podcast focused on the art of raising young classical musicians. A graduate of the Paris Conservatory of Music (CNSMDP), Ms. Horman received her first prize at age 15 and then was chosen that same year for Conservatory's 3rd Cycle program in the studio of violinist Gerard Poulet. Previous teachers include Jody Gatwood (National Philharmonic Orchestra Concertmaster Emeritus) and Patricia Hurd (Wolf Trap Opera Orchestra, Washington Ballet Orchestra). Dr. Jed Gaylin, Music Director, Hopkins Symphony Orchestra As Music Director, Dr. Jed Gaylin leads the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra (HSO), the Bay Atlantic Symphony, and Two Rivers Chambers Orchestra. He has been the Music Director of the HSO since 1993 during which time the orchestra has grown in size, prominence, and artistry into one of the country’s most accomplished university orchestras. The high standards of the orchestra and Jed’s belief in art’s ability to knit together and ignite new energy in our communities have resulted in collaborations with arts groups throughout Baltimore City, as well as with other non-profit and civic organizations. Dr. Gaylin earned both a Bachelor of Music in piano and as Master of Music in conducting at the Oberlin Conservatory, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended the Aspen Music Festival as a Conducting Fellow. Dr. Gaylin makes music with spirit and intellect, soul and rigor, a deep knowledge of world cultures, human nature, and the arts – that is, with his whole being. His approach to music, musicians, and life is rare; an old world commitment to the study and depth of conception, combined with a welcoming presence and warm engagement – both on and off the podium. To learn more about Dr. Jed Gaylin, please visit his website - https://jedgaylin.com/exquisite-revolution-mendelssohn
 Mar 03, 2021
 07:00 PM
Hopkins Symphony Orchestra Evenings Part II - Exquisite Revolution: Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity March 12, March 12, FridaySponsored by the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity & Evergreen Museum & Library Join Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., Philip Franklin Wagley Director and Curator, Evergreen Museum & Library, and Interim Director, Homewood Museum, as she takes us "behind the scenes" of the Evergreen Museum & Library to explore aspects of the museum not typically seen on museum tours. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants in advance of the program. If you are interested in becoming a member and experiencing an intimate connection with art and history, please visit our Membership page. Membership dues provide essential support for educational programs, exhibitions, preservation, and collections conservation. Join and enjoy an insider's experience while ensuring the stability and growth of Homewood and Evergreen. If you have any questions, please email museummembership@jhu.edu. You do not need to be a member to attend this program.  MEET OUR SPEAKER Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., Philip Franklin Wagley Director and Curator, Evergreen Museum & Library, and Interim Director, Homewood Museum Lori Beth Finkelstein, Ph.D., is the Philip Franklin Wagley Director & Curator of Evergreen Museum & Library. She is also serving as the Interim Director of the Homewood Museum. Dr. Finkelstein received both her M.A. and her Ph.D. in U.S. History from New York University, and her B.A. in North American Studies from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She came to Evergreen in the spring of 2019 after a long career as a museum educator and curator at institutions including Mt. Vernon Hotel Museum & Garden in New York City, the Baltimore Museum of Industry, and the Maryland Zoo in Baltimore, where she was the Vice President of Education, Interpretation, and Volunteer Programs from 2010 to 2019. Throughout her career in museums, Dr. Finkelstein has kept one foot in the classroom, teaching in Johns Hopkins’ undergraduate Program in Museums and Society and providing curricular support for the university’s online Master of Arts Program in Museum Studies. In addition, she has taught courses as an adjunct professor at Stevenson University and Seton Hall University.   lunch-with-the-libraries-behind-
 Mar 12, 2021
 12:00 PM
Lunch with the Libraries - Behind the Scenes at Evergreen Museum & Library
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity April 07, April 7, WednesdaySponsored by the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra and the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity In contrast to the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto of our last presentation, Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring was blatantly––perhaps, even calculatedly––revolutionary. It depicts human sacrifice, if self-inflicted. From its set, costumes, choreography, and maybe, most of all, its music, this work screams for attention, and has never lacked it since its 1913 premiere in Paris.  We will watch and discuss a video of the full ballet.  This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with registrants in advance of the program. Don't miss our other programs in our series of Evenings with the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra! February 3rd - Star-Crossed: Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet and Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story  March 3rd - Exquisite Revolution: Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto  May 19th - Powerful Works of Our Time: Sanchez-Guitierrez's Girando Danzando and Dusman's What Remains Please, register for each program individually. Click HERE to learn more about the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra. MEET OUR SPEAKERS Lisa Green-Cudek, Dancer, Choreographer, and Dance Historian Lisa Green-Cudek teaches courses in dance history, aesthetics, technique, and creative process at Loyola University of Maryland, and teaches ballet at Johns Hopkins University. She is on the faculty of Peabody Dance where she is also the resident dance historian. Green-Cudek has taught at Temple University and the University of the Arts in Philadelphia. She was faculty in residence at the Teacher Training Institute of Tanzundteaterwerkstatt in Frankfurt, Germany. Recent workshops for teachers include “Healing Social Wounds through the Arts” at Loyola University and “On Teaching Creative Dance” at Peabody’s Annual Regional Ballet Teachers’ Seminars. Green-Cudek is an advocate of dancing through the lifespan. She is a specialist in early childhood education, taught senior citizens for seven years in Philadelphia, and has extensive experience teaching in public and private elementary, middle, and high schools. Local schools include Patapsco High School and Center for the Arts, Randallstown High School, Roland Park Elementary School, The Bryn Mawr School, and The Wilkes School. An early proponent of arts integration, Green-Cudek received a certificate from the MSDE Maryland Teaching Artist’s Institute. While at Randallstown High School, Green-Cudek implemented a unique arts integration/leadership development program, the Dance Ambassadors, that guided dance students to collaborate on designing and teaching lesson units integrating dance with content in courses throughout the curriculum. Her choreography for The Peabody Opera, The Jewish/German Dance Theatre, independent artists, and students has been performed throughout Germany and in the United States at The Painted Bride, Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, The Baltimore Museum of Art, and myriad universities, local theaters, churches and synagogues. Green-Cudek’s work with the Jewish/German Dance Theatre was broadcast extensively on German television and, in the U.S., on CBS Sunday Morning. Green-Cudek is committed to cultivating dance in communities as a medium for exploring ideas and histories, identities and relationships. She has been awarded funding for this work from The Pennsylvania Humanities Council, The Maryland Humanities Council, The Peabody Institute of Johns Hopkins University, and the Center for the Humanities at Loyola University of Maryland. In 2015, Green-Cudek co-chaired Dance as Experience: Progressive Era Origins and Legacies, a special topics conference for the Society of Dance History Scholars. Her research has been published in Tanz Aktuel, Contact Quarterly, and numerous conference proceedings. She has presented her research at national and international assemblies including Tanzforum Frankfurt, The Congress on Research in Dance, the Society of Dance History Scholars, and the National Dance Education Organization. Dr. Jed Gaylin, Music Director, Hopkins Symphony Orchestra As Music Director, Dr. Jed Gaylin leads the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra (HSO), the Bay Atlantic Symphony, and Two Rivers Chambers Orchestra. He has been the Music Director of the HSO since 1993 during which time the orchestra has grown in size, prominence, and artistry into one of the country’s most accomplished university orchestras. The high standards of the orchestra and Jed’s belief in art’s ability to knit together and ignite new energy in our communities have resulted in collaborations with arts groups throughout Baltimore City, as well as with other non-profit and civic organizations. Dr. Gaylin earned both a Bachelor of Music in piano and as Master of Music in conducting at the Oberlin Conservatory, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended the Aspen Music Festival as a Conducting Fellow. Dr. Gaylin makes music with spirit and intellect, soul and rigor, a deep knowledge of world cultures, human nature, and the arts – that is, with his whole being. His approach to music, musicians, and life is rare; an old world commitment to the study and depth of conception, combined with a welcoming presence and warm engagement – both on and off the podium. To learn more about Dr. Jed Gaylin, please visit his website - https://jedgaylin.com/  bloodlust-stravinskys-rite-of-sp
 Apr 07, 2021
 07:00 PM
Hopkins Symphony Orchestra Evenings Part III - Bloodlust: Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity May 19, May 19, WednesdaySponsored by the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra and the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity These dramatic 21st century works both explore the orchestral tonal palette with great imagination and strength. Edginess in each is offset by great intimacy. Yet they have a completely contrasting hues and melodic invention.  Composers Linda Dusman and Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez join us for a discussion of these pieces and their creative approach.  We will watch the HSO October 2019 performance of What Remains and the March 2017 performance of Girando Danzando. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with registrants in advance of the program. Don't miss our other programs in our series of Evenings with the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra! February 3rd - Star-Crossed: Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet and Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story  March 3rd - Exquisite Revolution:  Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto  April 7th - Bloodlust: Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring  Please, register for each program individually. Click HERE to learn more about the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra. MEET OUR SPEAKERS Carlos Sanchez-Guitierrez The music of Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez has been described by the press as, “vigorously organized and highly visceral…neither eclectic nor post-modern nor owing allegiance to any passing fashion.” Born in Mexico City in 1964, he studied at the Peabody Conservatory, Yale University, Princeton, and Tanglewood under Henri Dutilleux, Jacob Druckman, and Martin Bresnick. He is Professor of Composition at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. Among the many awards he has received are the 2007 Barlow Prize, a Finalist Prize at the 2004 Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestral Composer Competition, as well as the 2003 Lee Ettelson Composition Award. He has also been honored in recent years with awards and fellowships from the Koussevitzky, Guggenheim, Fromm, Rockefeller, Camargo and Bogliasco Foundations. He was the 2000-01 American Academy of Arts and Letters Charles Ives Fellow and has received two B.M.I. Composition Awards, the Mozart Medal from the governments of Mexico and Austria, and a Fulbright Fellowship. Sanchez-Gutierrez’s work is performed and recorded frequently in the U.S, Latin America, Europe and Asia. Recently, Sanchez-Gutierrez has been Composer-in-Residence at several international festivals: Puentes Mexico/España, Chihuahua International Festival, Michoacan International New Music Festival, S.L.A.M. Festival in Seattle, as well as with the Binghamton Philharmonic (through a grant from the New York State Fund for Music.) Among Sanchez-Gutierrez’s most recently completed works are “Diaries” (a commission from the Orchestra of the League of Composers/ISCM),  “Memos” (a Barlow Endowment-commissioned work for the percussion ensembles SO, Kroumata and Nexus); “Five Memos” (a Fromm Music Foundation commission, written for Eighth Blackbird); …Ex Machina, for marimba, piano and orchestra (NY State Music Fund for the Binghamton Philharmonic); and “[…and of course Henry the Horse…] Dances the…” (Koussevitzky Music Foundation in the Library of Congress.) Linda Dusman Linda Dusman’s compositions and sonic art explore the richness of contemporary life, from the personal to the political. Her work has been awarded by the International Alliance for Women in Music, Meet the Composer, the Swiss Women’s Music Forum, the American Composers Forum, the International Electroacoustic Music Festival of Sao Paulo, Brazil, the Ucross Foundation, and the State of Maryland in 2004, 2006, and 2011 (in both the Music: Composition and the Visual Arts: Media categories). In 2009 she was honored as a Mid- Atlantic Arts Foundation Fellow for a residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. She was invited to serve as composer in residence at the New England Conservatory’s Summer Institute for Contemporary Piano in 2003. In the fall of 2006 Dr. Dusman was a Visiting Professor at the Conservatorio di musica “G. Nicolini” in Piacenza, Italy, and while there also lectured at the Conservatorio di musica “G. Verdi” in Milano. She recently received a Maryland Innovation Initiative grant for her development of Octava, a real-time program note system (octavaonline.com.) Linda Dusman’s recent works have been inspired by the landscape of Cape Ann, Massachusetts, where she vacations each summer on Folly Cove. Lake, Thunder was premiered at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC in 2015. Thundersnow was commissioned by the Italian Trio des Alpes in 2014, and premiered in Genoa, Italy that year. Her work for piccolo and alto flute An Unsubstantial Territory was recorded by the inHale Duo, and has received many performance throughout the United States and Europe. Piano Interiors was Dusman’s response to the 2012 Cape Ann Museum’s Soliloquy in Dogtown exhibition of works by Marsden Hartley. Her works are published by I Resound Press and Neuma Publications, and are recorded on the NEUMA, Capstone, and New Albany labels. As a sound artist, Dusman began experimenting with spatialized texts in the 1980s with a passage from Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans. Originally designed for quadraphonic tape, Becoming Becoming Gertrude explored the rhythms of Stein’s simple language in a dynamic evolution. Becoming Becoming Gertrude 2, available on Capstone Records, presents a stereo re-mix of the piece. Subsequent works include an interactive installation inspired by environmental decline using bird distress calls (and a voice was heard in Rama), and Mixed Messages, which uses telephone answering machine messages and an antique telephone switchboard as an interactive device. Mixed Messages was premiered at the University of New Mexico Museum of Art in 2005, and locations for other installations include the Pierogi 2000 gallery in New York, the alternative alternative exhibition on Wall Street, Dartmouth College, and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Magnificat 4: Ida Ida was released on the Sounding Out! DVD in 5.1 surround by Everglade Records in 2010. As a frequent contributor to the literature on contemporary music and performance, Dr. Dusman’s articles have appeared in the journals Link, Perspectives of New Music, and Interface, as well as a number of anthologies. She was a founding editor of the journal Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture, and is as an associate editor for Perspectives of New Music. She is founding editor of I Resound Press, a digital archive for music by women composers (iresound.umbc.edu). Former holder of the Jeppeson Chair in Music at Clark University and the Liptiz Chair at UMBC, she is currently Professor of Music and Chair of the Department of Music at UMBC in Baltimore. Dr. Jed Gaylin, Music Director, Hopkins Symphony Orchestra As Music Director, Dr. Jed Gaylin leads the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra (HSO), the Bay Atlantic Symphony, and Two Rivers Chambers Orchestra. He has been the Music Director of the HSO since 1993 during which time the orchestra has grown in size, prominence, and artistry into one of the country’s most accomplished university orchestras. The high standards of the orchestra and Jed’s belief in art’s ability to knit together and ignite new energy in our communities have resulted in collaborations with arts groups throughout Baltimore City, as well as with other non-profit and civic organizations. Dr. Gaylin earned both a Bachelor of Music in piano and as Master of Music in conducting at the Oberlin Conservatory, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended the Aspen Music Festival as a Conducting Fellow. Dr. Gaylin makes music with spirit and intellect, soul and rigor, a deep knowledge of world cultures, human nature, and the arts – that is, with his whole being. His approach to music, musicians, and life is rare; an old world commitment to the study and depth of conception, combined with a welcoming presence and warm engagement – both on and off the podium. To learn more about Dr. Jed Gaylin, please visit his website - https://jedgaylin.com/  what-remains
 May 19, 2021
 07:00 PM
Hopkins Symphony Orchestra Evenings Part IV - Powerful Works of Our Time: Sanchez-Guitierrez's Girando Danzando and Dusman's What Remains