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January 12, January 12, TuesdayPlease join us for a one-hour Zoom webinar to hear important updates from Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute leaders. Hosted by Dr. David McConkey, our virtual Zoom series is focused on engaging the broader bladder cancer patient/family/advocacy community. The webinar format includes a 20-25-minute presentation with slides, followed by a 40-minute conversational Q & A, with the opportunity to "chat" with experts.2021-01-12 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Where Does Bladder Cancer Come From? 2021-02-16 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Decoding Bladder Cancer Pathology -- 0 -- 0 Decoding Bladder Cancer Pathology 2021-03-16 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Living with Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Living with Bladder Cancer:  When Bladder Removal is the Only Option 2021-04-06 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Depression and Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Depression and Bladder Cancer:  It’s Not Your Imagination 2021-05-25 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- -- 0 -- Living with Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Living with Bladder Cancer: Sexual Health johns-hopkins-medicine-greenberg
 Jan 12, 2021
 04:00 PM
Johns Hopkins Medicine Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute 2021 Virtual Grand Rounds
 Location
Virtual
NA
March 23, March 23, TuesdayKnowledge is Power: Women and Bladder Cancer presented by Johns Hopkins Greenberg Bladder Cancer Institute Join as our multidisciplinary team presents topics to enhance your knowledge and provide support. Specialists in bladder cancer will discuss all facets of care and implications for female patients.  Our oncology social worker and other specialists will provide information to support quality of life. A patient will share their perspective and time for asking questions will facilitate participant engagement. This program is for women only to create a safe environment for open discussion.2021-03-23 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- 2021-03-23 -- 5 -- 30 -- PM -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- A patient’s perspective with guest speaker Discussion about disparities in diagnosis, outcomes, genetic differences, and questions to ask your team with Jeannie Hoffman-Censits, MD and Armine Smith, MD Coping strategies and resources for newly diagnosed cancer patients: Sibley’s Center for Patient and Family Services, community organizations, and advocacy groups with Samantha Rockler, MSW and Pam Goetz, OPN-CG. -- 0 -- Newly Diagnosed with Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Newly Diagnosed with Bladder Cancer: Questions I Wish I Had Known to Ask 2021-06-08 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- 2021-06-08 -- 5 -- 30 -- PM -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- A patient’s perspective with guest speaker Updates on treatment and clinical trials for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer with Armine Smith, MD Nutrition and Bladder Cancer with Hilary Berlow, RD, CNSC -- 0 -- Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer -- 0 -- 0 Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer in Women 2021-09-14 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- 2021-09-14 -- 5 -- 30 -- PM -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- A patient’s perspective with guest speaker Update on surgical options with Armine Smith, MD Living with a urostomy/nephrostomy, challenges with intimacy, sexuality, and body image with Samantha Rockler, MSW and Lora John, DPT, CLT -- 0 -- Surgery and Bladder Cancer in Women -- 0 -- 0 Surgery and Bladder Cancer in Women 2021-12-14 -- 4 -- 00 -- PM -- 2021-12-14 -- 5 -- 30 -- PM -- Virtual -- -- Virtual -- NA -- -- USA -- 1 -- A patient’s perspective with guest speaker Discussion on life after treatment and options for patients with metastatic disease with Jeannie Hoffman-Censits, MD and Armine Smith, MD Optimizing quality of life through cancer rehabilitation with Jessica Engle, DO Live well with an ostomy:  A discussion about what to expect after surgery, how to care for your ostomy, and the different pouching systems and resources that are available for ostomates with Christina Koehler, RN and Dorothy Shi, RN -- 0 -- Life with and after Bladder Cancer for W -- 0 -- 0 Life with and after Bladder Cancer for Women knowledge-is-power-women-and-bla
 Mar 23, 2021
 04:00 PM
Knowledge is Power: Women and Bladder Cancer
 Location
Via Livestream on jhu.edu/hopkinsathome
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHomeMay 05, May 5, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home, Hopkins on the Hill, Johns Hopkins University Office of Research and the Office of Federal Strategy Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome ABOUT THE PROGRAM Hopkins on the Hill is a biennial showcase of the range, value, and impact of federally-funded research and programming at Johns Hopkins University. This year, we’re taking our science into your homes and on your screens. Hear from early career researchers and practitioners to learn about their work in tracking and combatting COVID-19, education, space exploration, health care, extreme materials, climate change, and more! Click here to watch a welcome from our Maryland State Representatives! {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/545647039.jpg?itok=IdF03UpW","video_url":"https://vimeo.com/545647039","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":0},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive)."]}   May 5, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT   How Does Federal Research Funding Work? Presenters: Cybele Bjorklund, Denis Wirtz, and Keri Althoff Click here to learn more and register         May 12, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT  How do we redirect an asteroid?  Presenters: Nancy Chabot and Keri Althoff  Click here to learn more and register    May 19, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT  How will extreme materials save the world?  Presenters: Tim Weihs, Lori Graham-Brady, Kerri-Lee Chintersingh, and Keri Althoff  Click here to learn more and register      May 27, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT  How can we support people who want to age at home?  Presenters: Sarah Szanton and Keri Althoff  Click here to learn more and register      June 2, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT  How do researchers partner with indigenous communities to improve health and well-being?  Presenters: Melissa Walls, Victoria O’Keefe, and Keri Althoff  Click here to learn more and register      June 9, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT  How do you prepare for a highly infectious disease?  Presenters: Brian Garibaldi and Keri Althoff  Click here to learn more and register    June 16, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT  How can weather prediction save lives and money?  Presenters: Ben Zaitchik and Keri Althoff  Click here to learn more and register    June 23, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT  How can we address educational disparities exacerbated by COVID-19?  Presenters: Annette Anderson, Richard Lofton, and Keri Althoff  Click here to learn more and register      June 30, 2021, 12 p.m. EDT  How do you track a pandemic for the entire world?  Presenters: Lauren Gardner, Beth Blauer, and Keri Althoff  Click here to learn more and register  /event/hopkinsonthehill
 May 05, 2021
 10:00 AM
Hopkins on the Hill at Home
 Ticket Options
Mini-Course EnrollmentFree Registration
 Location
Via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHome May 12, May 12, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home, One Book Baltimore, and the International Arts and Mind Lab Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome May 12, 2021 - May 26, 2021 (3 sessions) Wednesdays, 6 - 7 PM ET ABOUT THE PROGRAM Baltimore City’s residents have long struggled with issues of inequity, poverty, and violence. In 2020, on top of a crippling pandemic, Baltimore saw 335 individuals die by homicide. In the face of a virtual school year necessitated by quarantine, opportunities for young people to connect with each other and share their feelings about their experiences became more important than ever.  In this class, you will learn about the One Book Baltimore project, which was designed to create dialogue on important community issues by having students across the city read the same book at the same time.  A collaboration between the Enoch Pratt Free Library System, Baltimore City Public Schools, the T. Rowe Price Foundation and the International Arts + Mind Lab, One Book provides 12,000 copies of the same book to Baltimore City 7th and 8th graders to read and discuss over a semester. By reading and discussing novels and memoirs about difficult topics, combined with opportunities to share personal stories, helps young people engage with their feelings as they cope with conflict and stress. During this Hopkins at Home course, you will learn about bibliotherapy, a practice which can provide insights into an individual’s personal challenges, allow them to explore a trauma through a safe space of literature, and encourage the practice of empathy. Readers can empathize with characters on the page while also learning factual information about their problems. Post-reading discussion or written reflections extend those benefits by offering a chance to process emotions and release trauma. We will read and discuss essays from the 2020 One Book, We Speak for Ourselves by Baltimore author D. Watkins. You will have the opportunity to engage in your own practice of bibliotherapy and celebrate some of the student work inspired by this project.  SYLLABUS May 12, 2021 Session 1: Introduction to One Book and the science of bibliotherapy Develop an understanding of the work of the International Arts + Mind Lab and how the arts support our health and well-being Explore the practice of bibliotherapy Learn about the One Book project Homework: Read selected essays from We Speak for Ourselves May 19, 2021 Session 2: We Speak for Ourselves Discuss and reflect upon key themes from We Speak for Ourselves essays Learn about options for the (optional) creative writing assignment Homework: (Optional) creative writing assignment   May 26, 2021 Session 3: Sharing and Celebration Hear from students and teachers who participated in the 2020-21 One Book project Experience spoken word performances by youth Optional: share your own creative writing with the group Individuals who register on or before May 1 may receive a copy of the One Book, We Speak for Ourselves, compliments of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. Supplies are limited. First come, first served. ABOUT THE PRESENTERS David Olawuyi Fakunle, PhD is a “mercenary for change,” employing any skill and occupying any space to help elevate everyone divested from their truest self, especially those who are Black, Indigenous and People of Color. David serves as Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of Florida Center for Arts in Medicine, and Associate Faculty in the Mental Health department of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. David’s interests include stressors within the built environment, societal manifestations of racism, and the use of arts and culture to strengthen health, equity, and ultimately liberation.   Tasha Golden, PhD is Senior Arts in Health Research Scientist at the International Arts + Mind Lab in the Brain Science Institute at Johns Hopkins Medicine. As a public health researcher and innovator, Golden studies impacts of arts, culture, environments, and discourses on well-being, health equity, research, and professional practice. Golden has served as an advisor on several national health initiatives, and is an adjunct lecturer for the University of Florida’s Center for Arts in Medicine.  Dr. Golden speaks internationally regarding health equity and intersections of health and the arts—including for POLITICO’s 2019 Annual Health Care Summit in Amsterdam. As founder of Idiom Insights, she consults with health and arts organizations to develop innovative projects and dissemination strategies that further their goals. Dr. Golden’s visionary work is bolstered by her career as an artist and entrepreneur. As singer-songwriter for the critically acclaimed band Ellery, she toured full-time in the US and abroad, and her songs have been in feature films and TV dramas. She is also the founder of Project Uncaged: an arts-based health intervention for incarcerated teen women that amplifies their voices in community and political discourses. Holding a PhD in Public Health Sciences, Dr. Golden draws on her diverse background to generate innovative partnerships, programs, and practices that advance health, inclusivity, and communications. Susan Magsamen is the founder and Executive Director of the International Arts + Mind Lab, a pioneering neuroaesthetics initiative from the Pedersen Brain Science Institute at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Her body of work lies at the intersection of brain sciences and the arts—and how our unique response to aesthetic experiences can amplify human potential. Magsamen is the author of the Impact Thinking model, an evidence-based research approach to accelerate how we use the arts to solve problems in health, well-being, and learning. In addition to her role at IAM Lab, she also serves as co-director of the NeuroArts Blueprint initiative in partnership with the Aspen Institute. Prior to founding IAM Lab, Magsamen worked in both the private and public sector, developing social impact programs and products addressing all stages of life—from early childhood to aging adulthood.  Magsamen created Curiosityville, an online personalized learning world, acquired by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in 2014 and Curiosity Kits, a hands-on multi-sensory company, acquired by Torstar in 1995. An award-winning author for children and families, Magsamen has published seven books including The Classic Treasury of Childhood Wonder, The 10 Best of Everything Families, and Family Stories, a five-part interactive series that included Nighty Night, Tooth Fairy Times, My Two Homes, Family Night, and Making Spirits Bright. Magsamen is a Fellow at the Royal Society of the Arts and a strategic advisor to several innovative organizations and initiatives, including the Academy of Neuroscience for Architecture, the American Psychological Association, the National Association for the Education of Young Children, Brain Futures, Learning Landscapes, and Creating Healthy Communities:  Arts + Public Health in America. LaTrisha Milton is the Young Adult Services Coordinator for the Enoch Pratt Free Library system. Originally from Baton Rouge, Louisiana she began her library career with the East Baton Rouge Parish Public Library system where she was employed for 15 years before moving to Baltimore, Md. in October of 2016. She began her career as a Library page (student worker) and worked her way up in the ranks. Throughout her career she has worked in many capacities including being one of the original staff members for the Community programs and Outreach services department in the East Baton Rouge Parish library system. She spend 5 years in this division. Other capacities she has served includes but are not limited to, Program coordinator for the Attic Treasures and Collectibles program (2013-2015), Senior Outreach Services Coordinator (2012-2015), Coordinator of PrattCon (2017), and Branch Manager (Walbrook Branch, 2017-2019). LaTrisha has an undergraduate degree in Marketing that she received from Southern University and A&M College (Baton Rouge, La.) and a Masters of Library and Information Science (MLIS) degree from the University of Southern Mississippi (Hattiesburg, Miss). She joined the Wide Angle in the fall of 2019. Wyatt Oroke is the 2020-2021 Maryland Teacher of the Year and has taught at City Springs Elementary School since 2015, and currently teaches seventh and eighth grade English, while also serving as a team leader, girls’ volleyball and boys’ basketball coach, and in a number of other roles in the school and his community. Mr. Oroke has received recognition for his teaching including awards from Johns Hopkins University, the Maryland State Senate, the Baltimore Orioles, as well as talk show host Ellen DeGeneres.       Stacey Van Horn is the Executive Director of the T. Rowe Price Foundation. Previously, Van Horn was manager of donor relations at T. Rowe's Program for Charitable Giving Inc., which she joined in 2001. At the Program for Charitable Giving, Van Horn oversaw grant-making, donor communications and program services. She also oversaw the implementation of a database of all program transactions. Van Horn holds a bachelor's degree in business from Michigan State University and a master's degree in social work from the University of Maryland School of Social Work.       About the Author D. Watkins is Editor at Large for Salon.  His work has been published in the New York Times, New York Times Magazine, The Guardian, Rolling Stone, and other publications.  He holds a Master’s in Education from Johns Hopkins University and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Baltimore. He is a college lecturer at the University of Baltimore and founder of the BMORE Writers Project, and has also been the recipient of numerous awards including the BMe Genius Grant, and the Ford’s Men of Courage. Watkins was also a finalist for the Hurston Wright Legacy Award and Books for A Better Life.  He has lectured at countless universities, and events, around the world. Watkins has been featured as a guest and commentator on NBC’s Meet the Press, CNN’s The Erin Burnett Show, Democracy Now and NPR’s Monday Morning, among other shows.Watkins is from and lives in Baltimore. He is the author of the New York Times bestsellers The Beast Side:  Living (and Dying) While Black in America and The Cook Up:  A Crack Rock Memoir and We Speak for Ourselves: A Word from Forgotten Black America.how-bibliotherapy-can-help-us-pr
    SOLD OUT
 May 12, 2021
 06:00 PM
How bibliotherapy can help us process challenging emotions and connect with others
 Ticket Options
Mini-course RegistrationFree
 Location
Via Zoom
NA
KriegerSchoolofArtsSciences HopkinsatHome May 17, May 17, MondayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome (Insert “Twitter Icon for Website” to the left of this line)  May 17, 2021 - May 31, 2021 (3 of weeks) | Mondays from 6-7 PM EST    How a Poem Begins: An Exploration of Poetry with James Arthur This Hopkins at Home course will be an immersion in the craft of writing poetry. Participants will experiment with a variety of poetic styles and techniques. As a class, we will explore several classic and contemporary poems every week, discussing each poet’s use of devices like assonance, refrain, and metaphor; we’ll pay especially close attention to how a poem can establish expectations in the reader’s mind, and then move the reader by either gratifying or subverting those expectations. We’ll also talk about how to find inspiration for your poetry, how to avoid cliché, and how to create musical effects through language. There will be a few writing exercises to attempt between sessions. Participants in the course will be encouraged, but not required, to share the poems that they develop in response to the exercises. Session 1: Monday, May 17, 6 - 7 PM | Repetition and Variation • the power of rhythm • anaphora and epistrophe • staying ahead of your reader’s expectations Session 2: Monday, May 24, 6 - 7 PM • assonance, rhyme, and alliteration • working within constraints Session 3: Monday, May 31, 6 - 7 PM   • finding inspiration • further adventures in musicality • how to revise About Our Speaker Canadian-American poet James Arthur is the author of The Suicide’s Son (Véhicule Press 2019) and Charms Against Lightning (Copper Canyon Press, 2012.) His poems have also appeared in The New Yorker, Poetry, The New York Review of Books, The American Poetry Review, The New Republic, and The London Review of Books. He has received the Amy Lowell Travelling Poetry Scholarship, a Hodder Fellowship, a Stegner Fellowship, a Discovery/The Nation Prize, a Fulbright Scholarship to Northern Ireland, and a Visiting Fellowship at Exeter College, Oxford. Arthur lives in Baltimore, where he teaches in the Writing Seminars at Johns Hopkins University.how-a-poem-begins
    SOLD OUT
 May 17, 2021
 06:00 PM
How a Poem Begins
 Ticket Options
Livestream RegistrationFree
 Location
Baltimore, MD
BloombergSchoolofPublicHealth HopkinsatHome May 18, May 18, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home The traditions, strengths, and resilience of communities have carried Indigenous peoples for generations. Drs. O’Keefe and Haroz will discuss the development and dissemination of “Our Smallest Warriors, Our Strongest Medicine: Overcoming COVID-19,” a children’s book aimed at providing indigenous communities public health education and a mental health coping resource. This lecture will discuss the power of Indigenous storytelling and cultural strengths to maintain physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual health during the COVID-19 pandemic. Learn more about the book and resource from the Center for American Indian Health by clicking here. Find the full manuscript here.    Emily E. Haroz, MA, MHS, PhD is a psychiatric epidemiologist by training, with expertise in research design and methodology and implementation science. She completed her Master’s and Doctorate in the Department of Mental Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Haroz currently serves as the director of mental and behavioral health research methods at the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, where she works on projects related to suicide prevention and mental health services research.       Victoria M. O’Keefe, PhD (Cherokee and Seminole Nations of Oklahoma) is the inaugural Mathuram Santosham Chair in Native American Health at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. O’Keefe is an Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Department of International Health (Social and Behavioral Interventions Program), an Associate Director at the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, and a Licensed Psychologist.  Her community-based participatory research (CBPR) with Indigenous communities focuses on strengths-based and culturally-informed suicide prevention, mental health promotion, and wellness. Don't miss out on our other On the Road with JHU stops coming this spring: May 15 - Chiles: The Spice of Life June - Pacific Northwest  July - New England The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.indigenous-storytelling
 May 18, 2021
 12:00 PM
Indigenous Storytelling
May 18, May 18, TuesdaySponsored by Lifelong Learning Everyone has something they want to change. Employees want to change their boss’ minds, and leaders want to transform organizations. Salespeople want to win clients, and marketers want to change consumer behavior.  Startups want to revolutionize industries, and nonprofits want to change the world. But change is hard. We push and push, but often nothing happens. Could there be a better way? In this webinar, New York Times Best Selling Author, Jonah Berger, introduces a revolutionary change approach. Successful change isn’t about pushing harder or exerting more energy. It’s about removing barriers and overcoming resistance by reducing friction and lowering the hurdles to action.  Discover the five hidden factors that impede change and how you can change anything by mitigating them. About the Author Dr. Jonah Berger is a world-renowned expert on change, word of mouth, influence, consumer behavior, and how products, ideas, and behaviors catch on. He has published over 50 articles in top‐tier academic journals, teaches Wharton’s highest-rated online course, and has published multiple New York Times bestsellers. He’s keynoted hundreds of events and frequently consults for organizations like Google, Apple, Nike, and the Gates Foundation. He’s been featured in NPR’s Marketplace, CBS This Morning, CNBC, USA Today, Fast Company Profile, Harvard Business Review, and The New York Times, to name a few./event/howtochangeanyonesmind
 May 18, 2021
 12:00 PM
How to Change Anyone’s Mind
 Ticket Options
Mini-course registrationFree
 Location
Via Zoom
NA
SchoolofMedicine HopkinsatHome May 18, May 18, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home  Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome  Tuesdays, May 18-June 1, 2021, (3 weeks), 8 PM EST  Throughout their lifetime, every woman will experience changes in their mood as a consequence of aging. From puberty to post-menopause, these physical, emotional, and physical changes can be confusing and concerning. Join three of Johns Hopkins Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences' Faculty as they share their research and expertise in three key stages of women's lifespan as they relate to mental health. Session 1 | May 18, 2021, Many women experience changes in mood related to their menstrual cycle. This lecture will focus on a range of mood symptoms that may occur across the monthly cycle, ranging from mild irritability to severe premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). Session 2 | May 25, 2021, Pregnancy and postpartum are times of enormous change for women, many of whom are vulnerable to mood and anxiety symptoms (with close to 20% experiencing postpartum depression).  This course will focus on the clinical presentation of perinatal mood and anxiety syndromes, touch on the reasons perinatal women are especially vulnerable, and offer up-to-date evidence-based recommendations for treatment. Session 3 | June 1, 2021, the transition to menopause, called perimenopause, represents a time of hormonal change, and increase risk for mood and physical symptoms that can affect quality of life and ability to function in one’s daily life. This lecture will describe the emotional, mental, and physical changes that can occur in the menopause transition and discuss various therapeutic approaches and treatments. About the Speakers   Liisa Hantsoo, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Her research and clinical work focus on premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).   Lauren M. Osborne, MD, is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and of Gynecology and Obstetrics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where she directs a postdoctoral fellowship program in reproductive psychiatry.  She is an expert on the diagnosis and treatment of mood and anxiety disorders during pregnancy, the postpartum, the premenstrual period, and perimenopause.  She conducts research on the biological mechanisms of perinatal mental illness, with a focus on neurosteroids and the immune system, and is the chair of a national task force working to create standards for education in reproductive psychiatry.  Her work is supported by the Brain and Behavior Foundation, the Doris Duke Foundation, the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology, and the NIMH. Lindsay R. Standeven, MD is a Reproductive Psychiatrist and Assistant Professor Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.  Her expertise is in the clinical treatment of reproductive-related psychiatric conditions including perinatal depression and anxiety, premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD), polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), infertility, and perimenopause-related mood changes. Her research focuses on the connection between neurosteroids and PCOS.  women-s-mood-disorders
 May 18, 2021
 08:00 PM
Women's Mental Health
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHomeMay 19, May 19, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home and Hopkins on the Hill  Brought to you by Hopkins at Home, Hopkins on the Hill, and the Johns Hopkins University Office of Research Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome ABOUT THE PROGRAM While the age of technology is exciting in its possibilities, we know that threats still exist: but science, and Johns Hopkins, are leading the way in protecting our armed forces and civilian populations from these threats. Join Tim Weihs (PhD, MS) and Lori Graham-Brady (PhD, MA) to see how Johns Hopkins is developing the next generation of warfighters, looking at the makeup of chemical weapons and nuclear blasts, and how we can better protect everyone. ABOUT THE PRESENTERS Kerri-Lee Chintersingh, PhD, is a postdoctoral fellow in the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute (HEMI) and Department of Materials Sciences and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. She is an experienced chemical and materials engineering researcher and past process control engineer with a demonstrated research history which spans across the fields of combustion, powder technology, energetic materials, catalysts and metals. Dr. Chintersingh strives to merge and balance the preparation and characterization of novel materials and development of experimental diagnostic tools and computational models, with the goal to optimize and better understand complex reaction mechanisms in varying environments.  Within the MSEE-URA, she is applying her research experience on the tuning of metal powders for ignition and combustion applications to ultimately intelligently design a new class of multiple-characteristic, time/temperature defeat energetics amenable to manufacturing scale-up.    Lori Graham-Brady, PhD, is chair of the Department of Civil and Systems Engineering and associate director of the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute (HEMI), one of Johns Hopkins University’s premier research institutes. She is also the Director of the Center for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (MEDE). Dr. Graham-Brady is a leading global researcher in the field of computational stochastic mechanics, multiscale modeling of materials with random microstructure, and the mechanics of failure under high-rate loading. Graham-Brady’s research provides critical computational modeling needed to understand the connections between material-scale uncertainties and reliability of structures. Her work in direct government and industrial application includes development of a collaborative program funded by and in partnership with the Army Research Labs for implementing multiscale modeling and design of materials for extreme dynamic environments, in particular designing ceramics and composites for armor applications.  Tim Weihs, PhD, is a professor of materials science and engineering and program manager of the Materials Science in Extreme Environments University Research Alliance (MSEE-URA). His research focuses on the fabrication, characterization and application of reactive, structural and functional materials. He is driven by an interest in developing an understanding of how novel processing and chemistries can deliver unique microstructures and properties for scientific studies and specific applications. In structural and functional materials, Weihs has leveraged thermal and mechanical processing methods to refine the microstructure of FeCo alloys for jet engine applications and the microstructure and chemistry of Mg alloys for armor and biomedical applications. Weihs also is using 3-D weaving and additive manufacturing to create novel architected materials with enhanced permeability, stiffness and damping for structural and biomedical applications. Through collaborations, his novel agent defeat materials have been shipped and tested at six national labs (including DSTL), two companies, and multiple universities.    Keri N. Althoff, PhD, is the Provost’s Fellow for Research Communication and an associate professor of epidemiology in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. As a Provost’s Fellow, she is expanding our institutional capacity to share research achievements. Dr. Althoff's research interest is aging in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. She serves as the co-director of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD), which is a collaboration of more than 20 longitudinal HIV cohort studies of adults with individual-level harmonized data. She earned her bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa, then her MPH and PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to becoming an accomplished epidemiologist, Dr. Althoff worked in public relations and journalism. Her skills and passion for sharing research with broad audiences make her the perfect host for Hopkins on the Hill at Home 2021.  The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions./event/HAHHopontheHill051921
 May 19, 2021
 12:00 PM
Hopkins on the Hill: How Will Extreme Materials Save The World?
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity May 19, May 19, WednesdaySponsored by the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity Starring Jassa Ahluwalia (Unforgotten, Peaky Blinders), Greg Germann (Grey’s Anatomy, Ally McBeal, Assassins), and Drama Desk nominee Sophie Melville (Pops, Iphigenia in Splott), Herding Cats by Lucinda Coxon (The Danish Girl) is a chillingly funny play about a generation negotiating intimacy and independence in the 21st century. Meeting the demands of modern life is as impossible as herding cats for Justine, Michael and Saddo. To deal with work, Justine talks – a little too much – to her roommate Michael who earns a living by chatting with strangers like Saddo. But all three will soon find that in a cold, disconnected world, words may not be enough. Directed by Anthony Banks (The Girl on the Train, West End), this groundbreaking revival of Coxon’s “brave, brutal” (Guardian) play uses the technical feats that adventurous theater artists have discovered during the pandemic and combines them with the raw intimacy of in-person performance. This first-of-its-kind, transcontinental event features two actors performing for an in-person audience on Soho Theatre’s (Fleabag) London stage with a third actor performing live via video from New York. The production, simultaneously accessible online to audiences across the globe via Stellar and in-person in London via Soho Theatre, marks a new type of international collaboration. This is a livestream with on-demand video available after the show. You can watch it live, or view the video for a certain amount of time after the show takes place.  This production contains distressing themes of sexual abuse. If needed, you may seek help from the RAINN National Sexual Assault Hotline. MEET THE PRODUCER, DIRECTOR, AND GREG GERMANN ON FRIDAY, MAY 21, 2021, 8:00 PM Following the live performance on Friday, May 21st at 8:00 pm, please join us for a, exclusive conversation with the Producer, Oliver Roth, the Director, Anthony Banks, and one of the play's starts. Greg Germann. Oliver Roth (A&S '12), Producer OHenry Productions is an Olivier Award-winning, Tony Award-nominated New York-based production company founded in 2014 by Oliver Roth. Situated at the intersection of art and commerce, OHenry Productions is dedicated to promoting the world’s most vital voices on the world’s most distinguished stages. Its mission is to produce work that is as engaging as it is inspiring, and as challenging as it is entertaining. Producing credits include – Broadway: Slave Play (Tony nomination), Burn This (Tony nomination), Sea Wall/A Life (Tony nomination), The Inheritance (Tony nomination), Derren Brown: Secret, Head over Heels; West End: The Inheritance (Olivier Award); Off-Broadway: Little Shop of Horrors, Invisible Thread; National Tour: Hundred Days, Escape to Margaritaville; Upcoming: Lempicka. ohenryproductions.com Anthony Banks, Director Anthony Banks has directed world premieres of many new plays including The Girl On The Train (West End/National Tour), Nick Dear’s Hogarth’s Progress (Rose Kingston,; Ryan Craig’s Games For Lovers (Vaults), Kevin Elyot’s Twilight Song (Park Theatre), Jim Cartwright’s Raz (West End/UK tour), Lucinda Coxon’s Herding Cats (Hampstead Theatre/Theatre Royal Bath); James Graham’s Bassett (Bristol Old Vic), Dennis Kelly’s DNA (UK tour), Bryony Lavery’s Cesario and More Light, Lucinda Coxon’s The Eternal Not and Michael Lesslie’s Prince of Denmark (National Theatre), Snoo Wilson’s Pignight (Menier Chocolate Factory), Mark Ravenhill’s The Experiment (Soho Theatre/Berliner Ensemble). He has also directed some twentieth century classics including Daphne du Maurier’s My Cousin Rachel by Joseph O’Connor, Patrick Marber’s After Miss Julie (Theatre Royal Bath), Patricia Highsmith’s Strangers on a Train; Patrick Hamilton’s Gaslight and Dial M For Murder (UK tours) and Tennessee Williams’ The Hotel Plays. Banks was an associate director at the National Theatre 2004-2014 where he commissioned and developed a hundred new plays for NT Connections. Greg Germann, Actor Germann became a member of Circle Repertory Company and Ensemble Studio Theatre, accumulating credits in such off-Broadway and Broadway plays as Steven Sondheim musical Asassins, The Person I Was opposite Holly Hunter and David Mamet’s War Games. Germann also starred in the hit play Speed the Plow at the Geffen Playhouse alongside Alicia Silverstone and Jon Tenney. Most recently he was seen in the origination of Steve Martin’s Meteor Shower at The Old Globe with Jenna Fischer. Greg has established his acting versatility in television as well. He endeared viewers worldwide with his portrayal of the shark-like Richard Fish for five seasons on the hit series “Ally McBeal”. He was a fan favorite on the first season of Showtime’s “House of Lies” playing the character ‘Greg Norbert’ alongside Don Cheadle and Kristen Bell. He took a turn playing the role of ‘Hades’ in the ABC series “Once Upon a Time”. Along with Keegan-Michael Key, Fred Savage, and Cobie Smulders, Greg was a part of the ensemble cast in the Netflix comedy “Friends from College”. Greg was recently seen in the CBS all access limited series “$1”. He can currently be seen as a series regular on the ABC hit “Grey’s Anatomy” playing the role of ‘Dr. Tom Koracick’. On the big screen, Germann was seen in the Warner Bros film Get Hard starring Will Ferrell and Kevin Hart. Greg’s other film credits include the Will Ferrell and Sacha Baron-Cohen comedy, Talladega Nights. He was also seen starring in the Sundance hit Friends with Money, alongside Jennifer Aniston, Catherine Keener, and Joan Cusack. Greg starred opposite Chris Rock in the Farrelly Brothers’ Down to Earth for Paramount, in the Warner Bros film Sweet November with Keanu Reeves and Charlize Theron. Greg also starred in the short film Culture which earned a 1999 Academy Award nomination. The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.  2021-05-19 -- 2 -- 30 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Baltimore -- NA -- -- USA -- 0 -- -- 0 -- May 19th Tickets - 2:30 pm EDT -- 0 -- 0 May 19th Tickets - 2:30 pm EDT 2021-05-20 -- 2 -- 30 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Baltimore -- NA -- -- USA -- 0 -- -- 0 -- May 20th Tickets - 2:30 pm EDT -- 0 -- 0 May 20th Tickets - 2:30 pm EDT 2021-05-21 -- 2 -- 30 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Baltimore -- NA -- -- USA -- 0 -- -- 0 -- May 21st Tickets - 2:30 pm EDT -- 0 -- 0 May 21st Tickets - 2:30 pm EDT 2021-05-21 -- 6 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Baltimore -- NA -- -- USA -- 0 -- -- 0 -- May 21st Tickets - 6:00 pm EDT -- 0 -- 0 May 21st Tickets - 6:00 pm EDT 2021-05-22 -- 2 -- 30 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Baltimore -- NA -- -- USA -- 0 -- -- 0 -- May 22nd Tickets - 2:30 pm EDT -- 0 -- 0 May 22nd Tickets - 2:30 pm EDT 2021-05-22 -- 6 -- 00 -- PM -- -- -- -- -- Virtual -- -- Baltimore -- NA -- -- USA -- 0 -- -- 0 -- May 22nd Tickets - 6:00 pm -- 0 -- 0 May 22nd Tickets - 6:00 pm herding-cats-a-play-that-crosses
 May 19, 2021
 02:30 PM
Herding Cats: A Play that Crosses the Line...And the Pond
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
ArtsEntertainmentMediaEntrepreneurship Affinity May 19, May 19, WednesdaySponsored by the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra and the Arts, Entertainment, Media, and Entrepreneurship Affinity These dramatic 21st century works both explore the orchestral tonal palette with great imagination and strength. Edginess in each is offset by great intimacy. Yet they have a completely contrasting hues and melodic invention.  Composers Linda Dusman and Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez join us for a discussion of these pieces and their creative approach.  We will watch the HSO October 2019 performance of What Remains and the March 2017 performance of Girando Danzando. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with registrants in advance of the program. Don't miss our other programs in our series of Evenings with the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra! February 3rd - Star-Crossed: Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet and Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story  March 3rd - Exquisite Revolution:  Mendelssohn’s Violin Concerto  April 7th - Bloodlust: Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring  Please, register for each program individually. Click HERE to learn more about the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra. MEET OUR SPEAKERS Carlos Sanchez-Guitierrez The music of Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez has been described by the press as, “vigorously organized and highly visceral…neither eclectic nor post-modern nor owing allegiance to any passing fashion.” Born in Mexico City in 1964, he studied at the Peabody Conservatory, Yale University, Princeton, and Tanglewood under Henri Dutilleux, Jacob Druckman, and Martin Bresnick. He is Professor of Composition at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York. Among the many awards he has received are the 2007 Barlow Prize, a Finalist Prize at the 2004 Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestral Composer Competition, as well as the 2003 Lee Ettelson Composition Award. He has also been honored in recent years with awards and fellowships from the Koussevitzky, Guggenheim, Fromm, Rockefeller, Camargo and Bogliasco Foundations. He was the 2000-01 American Academy of Arts and Letters Charles Ives Fellow and has received two B.M.I. Composition Awards, the Mozart Medal from the governments of Mexico and Austria, and a Fulbright Fellowship. Sanchez-Gutierrez’s work is performed and recorded frequently in the U.S, Latin America, Europe and Asia. Recently, Sanchez-Gutierrez has been Composer-in-Residence at several international festivals: Puentes Mexico/España, Chihuahua International Festival, Michoacan International New Music Festival, S.L.A.M. Festival in Seattle, as well as with the Binghamton Philharmonic (through a grant from the New York State Fund for Music.) Among Sanchez-Gutierrez’s most recently completed works are “Diaries” (a commission from the Orchestra of the League of Composers/ISCM),  “Memos” (a Barlow Endowment-commissioned work for the percussion ensembles SO, Kroumata and Nexus); “Five Memos” (a Fromm Music Foundation commission, written for Eighth Blackbird); …Ex Machina, for marimba, piano and orchestra (NY State Music Fund for the Binghamton Philharmonic); and “[…and of course Henry the Horse…] Dances the…” (Koussevitzky Music Foundation in the Library of Congress.) Linda Dusman Linda Dusman’s compositions and sonic art explore the richness of contemporary life, from the personal to the political. Her work has been awarded by the International Alliance for Women in Music, Meet the Composer, the Swiss Women’s Music Forum, the American Composers Forum, the International Electroacoustic Music Festival of Sao Paulo, Brazil, the Ucross Foundation, and the State of Maryland in 2004, 2006, and 2011 (in both the Music: Composition and the Visual Arts: Media categories). In 2009 she was honored as a Mid- Atlantic Arts Foundation Fellow for a residency at the Virginia Center for the Creative Arts. She was invited to serve as composer in residence at the New England Conservatory’s Summer Institute for Contemporary Piano in 2003. In the fall of 2006 Dr. Dusman was a Visiting Professor at the Conservatorio di musica “G. Nicolini” in Piacenza, Italy, and while there also lectured at the Conservatorio di musica “G. Verdi” in Milano. She recently received a Maryland Innovation Initiative grant for her development of Octava, a real-time program note system (octavaonline.com.) Linda Dusman’s recent works have been inspired by the landscape of Cape Ann, Massachusetts, where she vacations each summer on Folly Cove. Lake, Thunder was premiered at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC in 2015. Thundersnow was commissioned by the Italian Trio des Alpes in 2014, and premiered in Genoa, Italy that year. Her work for piccolo and alto flute An Unsubstantial Territory was recorded by the inHale Duo, and has received many performance throughout the United States and Europe. Piano Interiors was Dusman’s response to the 2012 Cape Ann Museum’s Soliloquy in Dogtown exhibition of works by Marsden Hartley. Her works are published by I Resound Press and Neuma Publications, and are recorded on the NEUMA, Capstone, and New Albany labels. As a sound artist, Dusman began experimenting with spatialized texts in the 1980s with a passage from Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans. Originally designed for quadraphonic tape, Becoming Becoming Gertrude explored the rhythms of Stein’s simple language in a dynamic evolution. Becoming Becoming Gertrude 2, available on Capstone Records, presents a stereo re-mix of the piece. Subsequent works include an interactive installation inspired by environmental decline using bird distress calls (and a voice was heard in Rama), and Mixed Messages, which uses telephone answering machine messages and an antique telephone switchboard as an interactive device. Mixed Messages was premiered at the University of New Mexico Museum of Art in 2005, and locations for other installations include the Pierogi 2000 gallery in New York, the alternative alternative exhibition on Wall Street, Dartmouth College, and the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Magnificat 4: Ida Ida was released on the Sounding Out! DVD in 5.1 surround by Everglade Records in 2010. As a frequent contributor to the literature on contemporary music and performance, Dr. Dusman’s articles have appeared in the journals Link, Perspectives of New Music, and Interface, as well as a number of anthologies. She was a founding editor of the journal Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture, and is as an associate editor for Perspectives of New Music. She is founding editor of I Resound Press, a digital archive for music by women composers (iresound.umbc.edu). Former holder of the Jeppeson Chair in Music at Clark University and the Liptiz Chair at UMBC, she is currently Professor of Music and Chair of the Department of Music at UMBC in Baltimore. Dr. Jed Gaylin, Music Director, Hopkins Symphony Orchestra As Music Director, Dr. Jed Gaylin leads the Hopkins Symphony Orchestra (HSO), the Bay Atlantic Symphony, and Two Rivers Chambers Orchestra. He has been the Music Director of the HSO since 1993 during which time the orchestra has grown in size, prominence, and artistry into one of the country’s most accomplished university orchestras. The high standards of the orchestra and Jed’s belief in art’s ability to knit together and ignite new energy in our communities have resulted in collaborations with arts groups throughout Baltimore City, as well as with other non-profit and civic organizations. Dr. Gaylin earned both a Bachelor of Music in piano and as Master of Music in conducting at the Oberlin Conservatory, and a Doctor of Musical Arts in conducting at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended the Aspen Music Festival as a Conducting Fellow. Dr. Gaylin makes music with spirit and intellect, soul and rigor, a deep knowledge of world cultures, human nature, and the arts – that is, with his whole being. His approach to music, musicians, and life is rare; an old world commitment to the study and depth of conception, combined with a welcoming presence and warm engagement – both on and off the podium. To learn more about Dr. Jed Gaylin, please visit his website - https://jedgaylin.com/ Disclaimer The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.what-remains
 May 19, 2021
 07:00 PM
Hopkins Symphony Orchestra Evenings Part IV - Powerful Works of Our Time: Sanchez-Guitierrez's Girando Danzando and Dusman's What Remains
 Ticket Options
Alumni and GuestFree
 Location
Virtual
BALTIMORE, MD
BloombergSchoolofPublicHealth Virtual May 19, May 19, WednesdayFor Healthy Aging, Lifestyles Matter! We live in a rapidly aging world with opportunities for longer life, but longevity is often compromised by deteriorating health. In order to maintain functioning and independence in later years, it is important to practice health-promoting behaviors throughout life. What is the current evidence on the role lifestyle factors play in physical and cognitive health? Specifically, lifestyle behaviors’ influence on dementia and frailty, the two major conditions that pose obstacles to healthy aging, will be addressed. This talk will present public recommendations, including practical tips, for engaging in healthy behaviors that can add life to years.   Yunhwan Lee, MD, DrPH ‘96, is a Professor of Preventive Medicine and Public Health at Ajou University School of Medicine in South Korea. His research focuses on understanding functional capacity of older adults, identifying its risk factors, and assessing the predictive value of multiple functioning profiles on health outcomes through longitudinal studies of aging. He has developed public health guidelines for promoting cognitive health (PASCAL) and preventing frailty (PROMISE) in older people. He has extensive experience in the design and analysis of national and community-based health surveys of older people. He is currently involved in designing a national survey of healthy aging and long-term care in Korea. Lee received his DrPH from the Bloomberg School of Public Health in the Department of Health Policy and Management in 1996.healthy-aging
 May 19, 2021
 08:00 PM
For Healthy Aging, Lifestyles Matter!
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Healthcare Affinity May 21, May 21, FridaySponsored by the Healthcare Affinity Join Dr. Mohan Bahadur Dangi (Engineering '09), an American environmental engineer, science diplomat, and professor in the Department of Geography and City & Regional Planning at California State University (CSU), Fresno, as he shares his journey from the foothills of the Wind River Range in WY to the refuse-filled streets of Kathmandu. The problem of garbage and waste in the streets led Dangi to further his education, which led to collaborations in WY, CO, MD, and CA. Known best for applying the stratified cluster-sampling technique to understand municipal solid waste generation at the source in low-income countries, Dangi will discuss, not only his career journey, but his work. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants in advance of the program. MEET OUR SPEAKER Mohan B. Dangi, Ph.D., P.E. (Engineering '09), Professor, Geography and City & Regional Planning, California State University, Fresno Mohan Bahadur Dangi is an American environmental engineer, science diplomat, and professor in the Department of Geography and City & Regional Planning at California State University (CSU), Fresno with a specialization in technical and social aspects of solid waste engineering and management. Professor Dangi is known best in applying the stratified cluster-sampling technique to understand municipal solid waste generation at the source in low-income countries. He has successfully tested a combination of engineering and social science approaches to tackle a four-decade-long, ineffective endeavor in solid waste management in Kathmandu, Nepal. His work in curriculum development and capacity-building activities has produced eight memoranda of understanding between U.S. and Nepali universities as well as two engineering curricula in his native country of Nepal. He initiated a life-changing study abroad course to third pole, Cultural Landscape and Environmental Change in the Himalayas, which brings ten U.S. students to work with ten of their Nepali peers each year. Professor Dangi, a 2021-2022 Jefferson Science Fellowship winner from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, has been awarded numerous accolades and recognition for his work. For example, he is a 2021-2022 Fulbright U.S. Scholar to Nepal from the U.S. Department of State and received the 2017-2018 Fulbright Specialist Award also from the U.S. Department of State. He was a Fulbright U.S. Scholar alternate to Nepal in 2020-2021. He was nominated for Steven K. Dentel AEESP Award for Global Outreach and, is a two-time nominee for the Provost's Award for Excellence in Teaching at CSU, Fresno. His students have received Standard Bearer of the College, multiple Most Outstanding Student Awards, and Best Poster Presentation Awards at state and international research presentations. Professor Dangi earned his Ph.D. and MS in Geography and Environmental Engineering from the Johns Hopkins University, both MSc in Environmental Science and Engineering and BSc in Chemical Engineering and Petroleum Refining with a minor in Asian Studies and International Politics from Colorado School of Mines, and AS in Physical Sciences with valedictorian from Central Wyoming College. He is a professional engineer (PE) in Colorado and serves on the Editorial Board of Waste Management & Research and three other journals. Among the leadership, Professor Dangi chairs University Task Force on Climate Action, co-chairs the College International Education Committee and Global Conference on Environment & Sustainability, and is a member of the Association of Environmental Engineering and Science Professors (AEESP).  Disclaimer: The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.from-the-rocky-mountains-to-the-
 May 21, 2021
 12:00 PM
From the Rocky Mountains to the Himalaya: A Waste Management Journey
 Ticket Options
LivestreamFree Registratioin
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
21218, NA
SchoolofMedicine HopkinsatHome May 25, May 25, TuesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome It is estimated that someone in the United States has a stroke every 40 seconds, and every 4 minutes, someone will die from stroke.  Are you prepared if this were to happen to you?  How can you lower your risk for stroke? In recognition of May as National Stroke Awareness Month, Dr. Johansen will educate us about the signs and symptoms of brain emergencies, the most important steps for the prevention of these emergencies, and provide a glimpse into her exciting research on the heart-brain connection. Learn more about stroke by visiting https://www.stroke.org . About our Speaker Dr. Michelle C. Johansen, MD-PhD is a board certified Cerebrovascular Neurologist and Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.  Dr. Johansen wears many hats in her career as a Clinician Scientist, and enjoys all of them.  Clinically, she sees patients in her own outpatient clinic, attends on the inpatient Cerebrovascular wards at Johns Hopkins, and cares for patients with diseases of the blood vessels of the brain or spinal cord.  She manages acute call for hospitals as distant as Bermuda, treating patients with a brain vascular emergency, such as an acute stroke or brain hemorrhage, and also precepts the Vascular Fellows at Johns Hopkins.  In her role as an educator, she is a member of the esteemed Osler Attending Service for the medical students, named after the founder of Johns Hopkins Sir William Osler, and was chosen by the American Neurologic Association as the winner of the 2020 AB Baker Teacher Recognition Award.  Finally, Dr. Johansen’s research focus is the heart-brain connection, specifically with regard to stroke etiology, in order to allow earlier diagnosis, and ultimately prevention of embolic stroke.  Relying on her background in chemistry from the University of Virginia, combined with her PhD from the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Dr. Johansen has already established a relationship between cardiac markers and brain changes in her patients at Johns Hopkins. She has found similar predictors of brain health using cardiac measures in large cohort studies, such as the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study, or the GeneSTAR study. With recent funding from the American Heart Association, and the National Institutes of Health, Dr. Johansen is now using advanced cardiac imaging methods and blood based biomarkers to diagnose the cause of patient strokes and determine the impact of cardiac changes on cognition over time.  Her work has been published in many high-ranking medical journals, and she has been interviewed as an expert for webinars, podcasts and websites, such as Medical News Today.    understanding-stroke-and-the-hea
 May 25, 2021
 12:00 PM
Understanding Stroke and the Heart-Brain Connection
 Ticket Options
Per alum or guest$10
Region May 25, May 25, TuesdaySponsored by Hopkins Alumni Join fellow alumni and friends for a sangria class to refresh your taste buds! Led by Immigrant Food's Head of Kitchen, Mileyda Montezuma, and Director of Communications and Outreach, Téa Ivanovic, SAIS '16, learn how to make this authentic drink (both white and red versions) while learning about the mission and story of Washington, DC's first-ever cause-casual restaurant. Immigrant Food is Washington, DC's first cause-casual restaurant that is a place for delicious food inspired by immigrants' gastronomic contributions, but also a platform for advocacy, change and community. Award-winning Chef Enrique Limardo's creative menu reflects America at its core: diverse, nourishing and welcoming. Immigrant Food donates parts of its space to five local immigrant-service NGOs for classes, trainings, and meetings. Their impact partnerships are central to their mission  as a cause-casual restaurant as they hope to raise public awareness of their partners' work and support them by channeling donors, volunteers and provide space to meet special needs. They are a restaurant that fuses gastronomy with advocacy ("gastroadvocacy" as they like to say) that has earned them a place on FastCompany's 2020 list of World Changing Ideas. Mileyda "Mile" Montezuma was born in Barquisimeto Venezuela, and she leads the kitchen at Immigrant Food. She has been our award-winning Chef Enrique Limardo's right-hand woman for half a decade. She always thought she would end up in business and accounting, receiving a B.A. in Business Administration from Lisandro Alvarez University in Venezuela, but her love of gastronomy and her keen culinary skills quickly dragged her away. She enrolled in the prestigious Adelis Sisiruca Culinary School and was snatched up immediately as Chef of Café Azafrán in Baltimore, Maryland. She then joined award-winning Chef Enrique Limardo at Alma, the acclaimed Baltimore Latin fusion restaurant, as Chef de Partie. When Enrique became a partner in the Immigrant Food project, there was only one choice to head up the kitchen!sangria-sips-tips-
 May 25, 2021
 06:30 PM
Sangria Sips & Tips
 Ticket Options
AdmissionComplimentary
May 26, May 26, WednesdayJHSON Virtual Nursing Grand Rounds Addressing the Mental Health Impact of COVID-19 on Nursing Students   The Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in partnership with the Nu Beta at Large Chapter of Sigma will offer a monthly Virtual Nursing Grand Rounds Continuing Nursing Education Series, providing an educational program led by top researchers from around the world.  In this May Virtual Grand Round, Dr. Tamar Rodney will address the mental health impact of COVID-19 on nursing students. This virtual grand round will explore pre-licensure nursing student concerns related to COVID-19, the perceived impact on education and clinical practice, and identify areas to mitigate changes in educational format. Tamar Rodney, PhD, MSN, RN is an Assistant Professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a formidable opponent. Tamar Rodney believes the key to beating PTSD is acting quickly to identify the syndrome and giving the science time to catch up. Dr. Rodney is a board-certified psychiatric nurse practitioner who has worked in trauma and psychiatry. Her PhD research looked at biomarkers for PTSD in veterans with a traumatic brain injury. Her career goal is to change the way health care professionals approach diagnosis and treatment planning for individuals with mental health needs. The Virtual Nursing Grand Rounds CNE Series will offer attendee one CNE credit upon completion of each session, with the goal of fulfilling the JHSON’s mission of providing lifelong learning for health care professionals within the community.     The Virtual Nursing Grand Rounds CNE Series is sponsored by the Nu Beta at Large Chapter of Sigma, the Honor Society of Nursing. The Nu Beta Chapter was established at Johns Hopkins School of Nursing in 1992. In 2018, the Johns Hopkins Health System joined the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing to become the first At-Large Chapter of Sigma. You can learn more here: https://nursing.jhu.edu/student-experience/honor-societymental-health-covid
 May 26, 2021
 11:30 AM
JHSON Virtual Nursing Grand Rounds: Mental Health
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Healthcare Affinity May 26, May 26, WednesdaySponsored by the Healthcare Affinity and the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Join Dr. Amit Jain, Adult and Pediatric Spine Surgeon, as he reviews the common causes of back pain, cutting edge technologies in spinal surgery, and discusses the role of stem cells, robotics, and artificial intelligence in the treatment of spinal conditions. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants in advance of the program. MEET OUR SPEAKER Amit Jain, MD, Associate Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery and Neurosurgery, and the Chief of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery at Johns Hopkins Dr. Jain received B.S. in Bioengineering with High Honors at UC Berkeley. He went to Hopkins for medical school, where he received the prestigious Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship. He remained at Hopkins for Orthopaedic Surgery residency, where he received the Miller-Coulson Award for Clinical Excellence and the Byank Award for Servant Leadership. He pursued fellowship in Spinal Surgery at the prestigious Emory Spine center before returning to Hopkins as faculty. Dr. Jain’s surgical practice focuses on taking care of adults with degenerative spinal conditions and children with scoliosis. His research focuses on improving outcomes and value in spine surgery. He is a Core Faculty member in the Hopkins Business of Health Initiative and collaborates with faculty at the Bloomberg School of Public Health and Carey Business School to study healthcare economics. He is also an Affiliate faculty member in the Lab for Computational Sensing and Robotics at the Whiting Engineering School and is developing next generation robots for spinal surgery. He has received multiple research honors including the Scoliosis Research Society Russell A. Hibbs and Thomas E. Whitecloud Awards. He is part of the research team that was recently awarded $9 Million NIH P01 grant. He has over 170 peer-reviewed publications, including in JBJS, Nature Communications, JAMA, and Harvard Business Review. He is passionate about mentoring students and trainees. Disclaimer The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.backs-and-the-future-with-dr-ami
 May 26, 2021
 12:00 PM
Backs and the Future with Dr. Amit Jain
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Law Affinity May 26, May 26, WednesdaySponsored by the Hopkins Alumni in Law Affinity and the Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Join us as our panel discusses the proposed new legislation aimed at dismantling corporate consolidation, which could have stark consequences for the tech industry. The key regulatory bodies tasked with overseeing tech giants, the Federal Trade Commission and the Justice Department's antitrust division, would receive more resources and power under the new legislation. This legislation, called the Competitive and Antitrust Law Enforcement Reform Act, would also create new standards for dominant companies trying to acquire nascent rivals. 2021 could be a turning point in regulating the industry. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants in advance of the program. MEET OUR MODERATOR Dean Valerie Suslow, PhD, Professor and Vice Dean for Faculty and Research, Johns Hopkins Carey Business School Valerie Suslow is the vice dean for faculty and research as well as professor, and she joined Johns Hopkins University in August 2015. Previously, Suslow was senior associate dean for MBA Programs at the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan, where she was also a professor of business economics and public policy, and the Louis and Myrtle Moskowitz Research Professor of Business and Law. Her research area is in the field of industrial organization, with a focus on the economics of explicit price-fixing and cartel operations.  In particular, she examines the determinants of cartel stability, international cartel operations, and antitrust policy responses.  Her most recent work analyzes the extent to which vertical restraints can support anti-competitive behavior, especially horizontal collusion.  Suslow has authored numerous articles and book chapters and her research has been published in journals including the Journal of Law and Economics, Antitrust Law Journal, International Journal of Industrial Organization, and Journal of Economic Literature. Suslow is a senior editor of the Antitrust Law Journal. Suslow earned her Ph.D. in economics from Stanford University and her undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley. Her awards include the Victor L. Bernard Faculty Award for Leadership in Teaching and the Andy Andrews Distinguished Service Award from the University of Michigan, and the John M. Olin National Fellowship from the Hoover Institution at Stanford University. MEET OUR PANEL Karen M. Lent, Esq. (Engineering '95), Partner, Antitrust/Competition; Sports; Complex Litigation and Trials, Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, LLP Karen Lent is head of the Antitrust/Competition Group in Skadden's New York office, representing a wide variety of clients in antitrust, sports and other complex litigation matters at both the trial and appellate court levels. She also provides general antitrust counseling.  Ms. Lent was named a Sports and Entertainment Trailblazer by The National Law Journal in 2019 and as one of Crain’s 2019 Notable Women in the Business of Sports. She also has repeatedly been selected for inclusion in Chambers USA: America’s Leading Lawyers for Business, in addition to being recognized as a 2019 Sports MVP by Law360 and named to W@Competition’s 2019 40 in Their 40s list of notable women competition professionals. Additionally, she has been named as a SportsBusiness Journal Power Player in sports law and by the same publication to their Forty Under Forty list, in addition to being named as a Future Star in Benchmark Litigation 2021, as well as Lawdragon 500 Leading Lawyers in America and The Best Lawyers in America. Ms. Lent also authors a monthly column on antitrust matters for the New York Law Journal.  In the antitrust litigation area, Ms. Lent has handled litigations involving price fixing, group boycotts, monopolization, other restraints of trade and class actions. Ms. Lent also has extensive experience counseling professional sports leagues and teams on a variety of antitrust and sports law matters, including the NBA, NFL, MLS, NHL and NCAA. Ms. Lent actively works on pro bono matters, and received the Legal Aid Society Pro Bono Publico Award in 2009 and 2011 for her successful representation of a disabled senior citizen whose landlord illegally overcharged her monthly rent for several years. Ms. Lent earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University and her J.D. from Fordham University School of Law. Eleanor Tyler, Esq. (SAIS '93), Senior Legal Analyst, Bloomberg Law Eleanor Tyler is a Senior Legal Analyst at Bloomberg Industry Group, with a focus on antitrust. Previously, she spent seven years reporting for Bloomberg Law's antitrust news desk. Before joining Bloomberg Law in 2010, Eleanor was a litigation associate at Locke Lord LLP in Houston. After earning her JD at Georgetown University, she clerked for the Hon. Simeon Lake in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas. She holds an MA in international affairs from Johns Hopkins SAIS, and a BA from Texas Christian University. Grace Maral Burnett, Esq., Legal Analyst, Bloomberg Law Grace Maral Burnett is a Legal Analyst on the Bloomberg Law Transactional team, with a focus on M&A. Previously, she was an M&A lawyer at Turunc law firm in Istanbul, where her practice focused on inbound and outbound M&A transactions and greenfield investment projects. At Turunc, she regularly advised multinationals and private equity funds on deals. Previously, Grace worked on business and employment disputes as a litigation associate at Leftwich LLC in Washington D.C. Grace received her JD and BA degrees from American University. Disclaimer The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.big-tech-antitrust-reform-a-pane
 May 26, 2021
 03:00 PM
Big Tech Antitrust Reform: A Panel Discussion
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHomeMay 27, May 27, ThursdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home, Hopkins on the Hill, and the Johns Hopkins University Office of Research Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome ABOUT THE PROGRAM Health begins at home, and we all want to be safe and comfortable in our homes. As we age, what difficulties might we encounter that could lead to injury, discomfort, or hindering our independence? Join Sarah Szanton (PhD, MSN, FAAN, ANP) in examining how the CAPABLE program at Johns Hopkins is helping provide support for our aging population around the country in reclaiming their abilities to care for themselves and participate in their communities. ABOUT THE PRESENTERS Sarah Szanton, PhD, MSN, RN, is the Patricia M. Davidson Professor of Health Equity and Social Justice and Director of the Center for Innovative Care in Aging. A number of years ago, while making house calls as a nurse practitioner to homebound, low-income elderly patients in West Baltimore, Dr. Szanton noticed that their environmental challenges were often as pressing as their health challenges. Since then she has developed a program of research at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing on the role of the environment and stressors in health disparities in older adults, particularly those trying to “age in place” or stay out of a nursing home. The result is a program called CAPABLE, which combines handyman services with nursing and occupational therapy to improve mobility, reduce disability, and decrease healthcare costs. She has tested the program's effectiveness through grants from the National Institutes of Health and the Innovations Office at the Center on Medicaid and Medicare Services. She has major funding from the Rita and Alex Hillman Foundation to build infrastructure for the CAPABLE program. Dr. Szanton is also conducting a study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, of whether food and energy assistance improve health outcomes for low-income older adults. A former health policy advocate, Dr. Szanton aims her research and publications toward changing policy for older adults and their families.  Keri N. Althoff, PhD, is the Provost’s Fellow for Research Communication and an associate professor of epidemiology in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. As a Provost’s Fellow, she is expanding our institutional capacity to share research achievements. Dr. Althoff's research interest is aging in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. She serves as the co-director of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD), which is a collaboration of more than 20 longitudinal HIV cohort studies of adults with individual-level harmonized data. She earned her bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa, then her MPH and PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to becoming an accomplished epidemiologist, Dr. Althoff worked in public relations and journalism. Her skills and passion for sharing research with broad audiences make her the perfect host for Hopkins on the Hill at Home 2021.  The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions./event/HAHHopontheHill052721
 May 27, 2021
 12:00 PM
Hopkins on the Hill: How Can We Support People Who Want to Age at Home?
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Affinity June 01, June 1, TuesdaySponsored by the Hopkins Robotics Alumni Network & the Laboratory for Computational Sensing + Robotics Join us as we hear from David Levi (Engineering '17), Manager of Hardware Development for Microsurgical Robots at Galen Robotics, about his career journey and current role at Galen Robotics. After we hear from our speaker, we'll have time for Q&A with our speaker and time to network with one another. This program will be presented by Zoom. A link will be shared with you in advance of the program.  MEET OUR SPEAKER David Levi (Engineering '17), Manager of Hardware Development, Galen Robotics Driven by a deep love of innovation, Mr. Levi has experience in mechanical engineering with a focus on precision mechanisms, deterministic design, robotics, dynamic system design, and electromechanical systems integration. After working as the Lead Mechanical Engineer at Galen Robotics, he is now the Manager of Hardware Design. Galen Robotics is developing a single-platform solution to aid surgeons across several disciplines with minimal disturbance to existing workflows. Galen Robotics' cooperative control paradigm aims to eliminate hand tremor and enable surgeons to realize precise minimally invasive interventions in otolaryngology, spine surgery, and tissue reconstruction that were previously considered beyond human capacity. Founded in 2016 to commercialize the research done in the Laboratory for Computational Sensing + Robotics at Johns Hopkins University, Dr. Kevin Olds and Dr. Russell Taylor invented the Robotic ENT Microsurgical System (REMS) at JHU to prevent the complications caused by hand tremor in minimally invasive otolaryngology interventions. Galen is expanding on this vision and technology. Mr. Levi earned both his Bachelor's and Master's Degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Johns Hopkins University. He worked as an undergraduate and graduate researcher in the Advanced Medical Instrumentation and Robotics Research Laboratory (AMIRo) within the LCSR. Disclaimer: The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.network-with-the-hopkins-robotic
 Jun 01, 2021
 03:00 PM
Network with The Hopkins Robotics Affinity
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHomeJune 02, June 2, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home, Hopkins on the Hill, and the Johns Hopkins University Office of Research Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome ABOUT THE PROGRAM Researchers from the Center for American Indian Health work alongside indigenous communities to improve resilience, optimal health, and well-being. Learn from Dr. Melissa Walls how the Healing Pathways Project, a community-based participatory research study in the Great Lakes region, is identifying and promoting traditions of strength and healing with 735 American Indian and First Nations youth and their families living in the northern Midwestern United States and Ontario, Canada. Dr. Victoria O’Keefe will discuss the Elders Resilience Curriculum developed with the White Mountain Apache, which is an innovative curriculum that connects youth through Elders to their heritage, traditions, and culture, which has been proven to be a protective factor for native Americans.   ABOUT THE PRESENTERS Victoria O’Keefe, PhD, holds the Mathuram Santosham Chair in Native American Health Assistant Professor in the Center for American Indian Health. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of International Health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. As a member of the Cherokee and Seminole Nations of Oklahoma, Victoria is dedicated to working collaboratively with tribal communities to eradicate health disparities. Her primary research area is in developing and evaluating suicide prevention, intervention, and postvention programs that are grounded in tribal culture and implemented/sustained by Native communities. She is also interested in social, historical, and cultural determinants that relate to health status (e.g., microaggressions, historical trauma, cultural identity). In addition, Victoria is passionate about mentoring the next generation of American Indian/Alaska Native/First Nations scholars pursuing public health degrees and careers.  Melissa Walls, PhD (Bois Forte and Couchiching First Nation Anishinaabe), is the Director of the Great Lakes Hub for the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health and associate professor of International Health at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The Center’s new hub, based in Duluth, MN, is building upon existing partnerships with hundreds of tribal members across 11 Ojibwe Bands. This collaboration will advance leading-edge research projects focusing on the etiology and consequences of diabetes, substance use, mental disorders, and physical health issues—as well as opportunities to prevent these and other health challenges. Dr. Walls is a social scientist committed to collaborative research and has over a decade of experience working with tribal communities in the United States and Canada. Dr. Walls’s collaborative work has received funding from the National Institutes of Health and the Public Health Agency of Canada.  Keri N. Althoff, PhD, is the Provost’s Fellow for Research Communication and an associate professor of epidemiology in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. As a Provost’s Fellow, she is expanding our institutional capacity to share research achievements. Dr. Althoff's research interest is aging in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. She serves as the co-director of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD), which is a collaboration of more than 20 longitudinal HIV cohort studies of adults with individual-level harmonized data. She earned her bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa, then her MPH and PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to becoming an accomplished epidemiologist, Dr. Althoff worked in public relations and journalism. Her skills and passion for sharing research with broad audiences make her the perfect host for Hopkins on the Hill at Home 2021.  The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions./event/HAH-HopontheHill060221
 Jun 02, 2021
 12:00 PM
Hopkins on the Hill: How do Researchers Partner with Indigenous Communities to Improve Health and Well-being?
June 03, June 3, ThursdaySponsored by Lifelong Learning Email replies that show up a week later. Video chats full of “oops... sorry no you go” and “can you hear me?!” Is it any wonder communication takes us so much time and effort to figure out? How did we lose our innate capacity to understand each other? Humans rely on body language to connect and build trust. Still, with most of our communication happening from behind a screen, traditional body language signals are no longer visible - or are they? In this enlightening webinar, author Erica Dhawan combines cutting-edge research with engaging storytelling to decode the new signals and cues that have replaced traditional body language across genders, generations, and cultures. You will learn your collaboration style and the digital body language signals you may be broadcasting, how to develop a collaboration strategy that fosters valuable relationships, and how to end cultures of useless meetings, missed deadlines, and digital misunderstandings. About the Author Erica Dhawan, author of Digital Body Language and co-author of the bestselling book Get Big Things Done: The Power of Connectional Intelligence, is the Founder & CEO of Cotential, a global organization that helps companies, leaders, and managers leverage 21st-century collaboration skills and behaviors to improve game-changing performance. Erica speaks on international stages ranging from the World Economic Forum at Davos and TED to Coca-Cola, FedEx, Goldman Sachs, Walmart, SAP, and Cisco. Erica writes for Harvard Business Review, Forbes, Fast Company./event/digitalbodylanguage
 Jun 03, 2021
 12:00 PM
Digital Body Language: Collaborate Faster and Further, Together
 Location
Via Livestream
Baltimore, MD
SchoolofMedicine HopkinsatHomeJune 08, June 8, TuesdayBrought to you by Johns Hopkins Medicine – A Woman’s Journey on Hopkins at Home  Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome  REGISTER HERE to join the livestream on Tuesday, June 8 at 7-8 p.m. EDT The American Cancer Society estimates that in the United States in 2020, more than 100,000 new melanomas will be diagnosed and approximately 6,850 people will die of the disease. Before hitting the beach to celebrate summer, listen as oncologist William Sharfman reviews the risks, signs and symptoms of melanoma. Sharfman also discusses melanoma research and treatment protocols, as well as novel therapies for high risk patients with advanced melanoma. William Sharman, M.D. is an associate professor of oncology and dermatology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His areas of clinical expertise include cutaneous oncology, dermatology, gastrointestinal cancers and immunotherapy. He helped create the well-established Melanoma Program at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in 1994. Dr. Sharfman serves as the director of cutaneous oncology and clinical co-director for oncology at the Johns Hopkins Melanoma Program. He earned his M.D. from the University of Toledo College of Medicine. He completed his residency at Cleveland Clinic and performed a fellowship in hematology and oncology at Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Sharfman's research interests include novel therapies for high risk and advanced melanoma patients; GI cancers; and lung cancer./event/HAHWomansJourneyJune8
 Jun 08, 2021
 07:00 PM
A Woman's Journey: Sunshine on a Rainy Day — Avoiding Melanoma
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHomeJune 09, June 9, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home, Hopkins on the Hill, and the Johns Hopkins University Office of Research Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome ABOUT THE PROGRAM Johns Hopkins hosts one of ten Biocontainment Units (BCUs) around the country. They stand ready at all times to treat patients with highly infectious diseases while ensuring our healthcare workers and the surrounding community stays safe. Originally built to provide treatment for patients with Ebola, the Johns Hopkins BCU is leading the response of Johns Hopkins in treating COVID-19 patients, while simultaneously preparing for the next possible pandemic. Join Brian Garibaldi (MD), Medical Director of the BCU, and some of the BCU staff to learn about pandemic preparedness. ABOUT THE PRESENTERS Brian Garibaldi, MD, is the Medical Director of the Johns Hopkins Biocontainment Unit (BCU), one of 10 federally funded BCUs that provide care for patients infected with high consequence pathogens such as Ebola virus disease. He is also an associate professor in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, where he attends in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) and the Interstitial Lung Disease clinic. Dr. Garibaldi has an in-depth knowledge of the challenges of the biocontainment environment and understands the specific threats to both health care worker and patient safety in the setting of highly infectious diseases. In addition to caring for patients with COVID-19, he is the director of the newly established COVID-19 Precision Medicine Center of Excellence, which houses the JH-CROWN clinical registry. In addition, Dr. Garibaldi is an accomplished clinical educator. In 2017, he co-founded, and became the first president of the Society of Bedside Medicine, an organization devoted to education, innovation and research on the role of the clinical encounter in 21st century medicine. Dr. Garibaldi grew up in New York City and graduated summa cum laude from Harvard College with a degree in biological anthropology. Before earning his medical degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, he spent a year studying flamenco and classical guitar in Spain as part of the John Finley Fellowship from Harvard College. He completed his internal medicine residency as well as pulmonary and critical care fellowship at Johns Hopkins.  Keri N. Althoff, PhD, is the Provost’s Fellow for Research Communication and an associate professor of epidemiology in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. As a Provost’s Fellow, she is expanding our institutional capacity to share research achievements. Dr. Althoff's research interest is aging in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. She serves as the co-director of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD), which is a collaboration of more than 20 longitudinal HIV cohort studies of adults with individual-level harmonized data. She earned her bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa, then her MPH and PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to becoming an accomplished epidemiologist, Dr. Althoff worked in public relations and journalism. Her skills and passion for sharing research with broad audiences make her the perfect host for Hopkins on the Hill at Home 2021.  The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions./event/HAHHopontheHill060921
 Jun 09, 2021
 12:00 PM
Hopkins on the Hill: How Do You Prepare for a Highly Infectious Disease?
 Location
1500 Pattison Ave
Philadelphia, PA
Region June 11, June 11, FridaySponsored by Hopkins Alumni The region’s most looked-to gardening attraction will move outdoors for the first time, making this a history-making, once-in-a-lifetime experience that will incorporate the beautiful, unique landscape of FDR Park in Philadelphia. The 2021 Flower Show invites you to a spectacular presentation of all-new displays, plus activities for gardeners, plant enthusiasts, and design aficionados. The Show’s theme, “HABITAT: Nature’s Masterpiece,” will explore the beauty of life through nature’s kaleidoscopic lens. Visitors should be ready to see exceptional beauty, learn from a diverse line-up of designers and leading horticulturalists, and enter a new gardener-centric experience that invites everyone at all skill levels to nurture a lifelong connection to plants and gardening. Due to COVID precautions, the JHAA will only be offering tickets this year (no bus travel/lunch). Tickets are available for Friday, June 11, for the AM session (10am-2pm) and PM session (2pm-7pm) for you to use at your discretion and with those closest to you. Registration is limited and each order will have a 4 ticket max - all tickets will be distributed electronically. Please check the PHS website here for more information on parking and to help you plan your trip.  All ticket sales are final - ticketed events are non-refundable. *Tickets should not be sold or transferred without JHAA approval  JHAA Event Cancellation and Refund Policy2021-06-11 -- 10 -- 00 -- AM -- 2021-06-11 -- 2 -- 00 -- PM -- 1500 Pattison Avenue -- -- Philadelphia -- PA -- 19145 -- USA -- 0 -- -- 30 -- Per alum or guest -- 0 -- 0 AM Session 2021-06-11 -- 2 -- 00 -- PM -- 2021-06-11 -- 7 -- 00 -- PM -- 1500 Pattison Avenue -- -- Philadelphia -- PA -- 19145 -- USA -- 0 -- -- 30 -- PM Session -- 0 -- 0 PM Session 2021-phs-philadelphia-flower-sho
 Jun 11, 2021
 10:00 AM
2021 PHS Philadelphia Flower Show: HABITAT
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHomeJune 16, June 16, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home, Hopkins on the Hill, and the Johns Hopkins University Office of Research Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome ABOUT THE PROGRAM There's an old joke that "Everybody complains about the weather, but nobody does anything about it." Dr. Zaitchik wants to do something about it, and with weather patterns changing all over the world, we have to do something about it. His team doesn't try to change the weather, but they do try to understand and predict the ways in which weather and climate impact things we all care about: our food, our health, our safety. Come hear about Dr. Zaitchik’s recent projects, ranging from predicting flash droughts and outbreaks of enteric diseases, to enhancing the value of the JH Coronavirus Dashboard for COVID-19 research. ABOUT THE PRESENTERS Benjamin Zaitchik, PhD, is an associate professor of earth and planetary sciences. His research is directed at understanding, managing, and coping with climatic and hydrologic variability. Understanding variability requires examination of the natural processes that drive climate and surface change. Managing variability relates to our ability to control anthropogenic influences on climate and hydrology at the local, regional, and global scales. Coping with variability includes improved forecast systems and methods of risk assessment. In each of these areas of research he employs a combination of observation-both in situ and remotely sensed-and numerical modeling techniques. This includes work on fundamental atmospheric and hydrological processes as well as applications to water resources, agriculture, energy, and human health. Prior to joining JHU, Ben was a research associate at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and an American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow at the U.S. Department of State.  Keri N. Althoff, PhD, is the Provost’s Fellow for Research Communication and an associate professor of epidemiology in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. As a Provost’s Fellow, she is expanding our institutional capacity to share research achievements. Dr. Althoff's research interest is aging in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. She serves as the co-director of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD), which is a collaboration of more than 20 longitudinal HIV cohort studies of adults with individual-level harmonized data. She earned her bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa, then her MPH and PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to becoming an accomplished epidemiologist, Dr. Althoff worked in public relations and journalism. Her skills and passion for sharing research with broad audiences make her the perfect host for Hopkins on the Hill at Home 2021.  The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions./event/HAHHopontheHill061621
 Jun 16, 2021
 12:00 PM
Hopkins on the Hill: How Can Weather Prediction Save Lives and Money?
 Ticket Options
Free per alum or guest
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
Baltimore, MD
AlexanderGrassHumanitiesInstitute KriegerSchoolofArtsSciences HopkinsatHome Region June 17, June 17, ThursdaySponsored by Hopkins Alumni & Hopkins at Home Derived from the French word terre, meaning “earth”, terroir refers to the environmental factors that affect crops in specific reasons. During this event, you’ll uncover the terroir of the Pacific Northwest region of the United States through three lenses while exploring some wine from the region. As we discuss terroir in food with a focus on wine, we'll hear from viticulturists and fellow alumni, David (School of Medicine '72) and Jeanne (School of Medicine '69) Crawford Beck, who will share their knowledge of terroir as it relates to the grapes they grow at the Crawford Beck Vineyard in Amity, OR and lead us through a wine tasting (optional) featuring Winderlea Vineyard & Winery, a local Oregon wine. We'll also be joined by two faculty members from the Krieger School of Arts & Sciences (KSAS). Bill Eggington, the Decker Professor in the Humanities and Director of the Alexander Grass Humanities Institute, will explore the ways in which the Pacific Northwest region mirrors various parts of Europe and how we can find bits of that cultural influence in this region of the US. Tom Lectka, Jean and Norman Scowe Professor of organic chemistry, will share the science behind the grape and how chemistry shapes our experiences in taste. This conversation will be moderated by alumna Eugenia Liu, KSAS '96, member of the Hopkins Portland alumni chapter committee.  We have put together a pair of 2017 Winderlea pinot noir wines, one from the Crawford Beck Vineyard and one from the Winderlea Estate Vineyard, for our tasting and comparison. They are from the same vintage, same winemaker, same grape, same region of Oregon’s Willamette Valley, but different vineyards on different soils, different farming practices, different environmental conditions, etc. The special price for JHU will be $110 with FedEx ground “cold chain” shipping for quality control. This price will be valid for orders through 5pm PT on May 27 (for delivery by June 9) - for orders placed after, the cost will increase to $125. June 10 will be the last day for orders to assure arrival for program. To order, please go to: https://winderlea.com/product/crawford-beck-pack/ You can choose your own wines for this exercise if you prefer. We cannot suggest specific wines because the wine availability and stock varies so widely. Go to your favorite wine shop and ask a knowledgeable sales person for two bottles, preferably of pinot noir, a delicate grape that shows the subtleties of terroir better than some other less delicate grapes, look specifically for from the same vintage and winery, but different vineyards or from the same winery and vineyard but different vintages. It is advantageous to have a snack to go along with your sipping. You should have the same snack, very lightly flavored, for all of your sipping. Multiple snacks, especially highly flavored cheeses or charcuterie can skew your palate if you are trying to discern the differences between fine wines. “Oyster” crackers are ideal, but our favorite snack is the French hors d’oeuvre called gougères. They are very simple to make, but take caution: they are addictive!  The recipe will be shared with all registrants.  The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.on-the-road-with-jhu-terroir-a-s
 Jun 17, 2021
 06:30 PM
On the Road with JHU - Terroir: A Sense of Place for food and drinks
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHome VirtualJune 23, June 23, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home, Hopkins on the Hill, and the Johns Hopkins University Office of Research Follow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome ABOUT THE PROGRAM Schools have faced unprecedented challenges in the COVID-19 era, including tracking students’ progress and engagement while converting to a virtual environment and/or managing novel hybrid schedules. These challenges have disproportionately affected our most vulnerable students: those from low-income families. Join educational experts, Annette Anderson (PhD) and Richard Lofton (PhD), as they discuss lessons learned from the last year and what can be done to improve educational equity in the United States. ABOUT THE PRESENTERS Annette C. Anderson, PhD, is a native of Baltimore and a graduate of Baltimore City Public Schools, an experience that has left an indelible mark on her career interests in educational equity and adequacy. Besides her research pursuits, she has served in a variety of school-based positions, including classroom teacher, teacher leader, curriculum coordinator, and assistant principal. She served as the chief executive officer and founding principal of Widener Partnership Charter School, the first university-assisted charter school in Pennsylvania. The school quickly became known to state and local education officials as a successful model for university-public school partnerships. She is the Deputy Director of Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools and has assumed advisory and related duties for the School Administration & Supervision programs at the Johns Hopkins School of Education. She holds a Ph.D. and master’s degree from University of Pennsylvania, a second master’s degree in public policy from Georgetown University, and a bachelor’s degree from Syracuse University.    Richard Lofton, Jr., PhD, an assistant professor of education at the Center for Social Organization of Schools and Johns Hopkins School of Education, is co-principal investigator for the national evaluation of the Student Success Mentor Initiative, which is funded by the Arnold Foundation. The initiative aims to reduce chronic absenteeism, develop caring relationships within schools and increase successful outcomes for students. Also, his research explores the Black habitus of African American students and parents and the impact of concentrated poverty on homes, schools and communities. His research examines the importance of uncovering systemic inequalities, illuminating agency and developing meaningful relationships with students and their parents for academic success. He is a graduate of Teachers College, Columbia University, and recently completed a two-year postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Social Organization of Schools.  Keri N. Althoff, PhD, is the Provost’s Fellow for Research Communication and an associate professor of epidemiology in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. As a Provost’s Fellow, she is expanding our institutional capacity to share research achievements. Dr. Althoff's research interest is aging in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. She serves as the co-director of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD), which is a collaboration of more than 20 longitudinal HIV cohort studies of adults with individual-level harmonized data. She earned her bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa, then her MPH and PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to becoming an accomplished epidemiologist, Dr. Althoff worked in public relations and journalism. Her skills and passion for sharing research with broad audiences make her the perfect host for Hopkins on the Hill at Home 2021. The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions./event/HAHHopontheHill062321
 Jun 23, 2021
 12:00 PM
Hopkins on the Hill: How Can We Address Educational Disparities Exacerbated by COVID-19?
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
BlockchainFinTech Affinity June 24, June 24, ThursdaySponsored by the Blockchain and Finance Affinities Blockchain has thus far not fully shed its Wild West aura, but regulators are adapting their legal regimes to the technology’s uses in finance and other areas. Securities, commodities, and banking regulation, tax enforcement, litigation, a potential SEC task force on blockchain and digital currencies, Federal Reserve consideration of a digital dollar – not to mention exciting new applications, such as vaccine passports – all these efforts working together over the next period may combine to bring blockchain into mainstream usage as a mature technology. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared in advance of the program. MEET OUR MODERATOR Diane Holt, Analysis Team Lead, Bloomberg Law Transactional Team Diane Holt is the Team Lead for the Bloomberg Law Transactional team.  Previously, she worked as transactional counsel for Enel, SpA, the Italian electric monopoly, in Rome, Italy, where she led the transaction team during several formative acquisitions and divestitures around the world, in addition to advising the venture capital subsidiary. Diane worked as an independent consultant to Central European regional businesses in transition; she served as Managing Consultant of Central European Advisory Group, the regional legal and business consultancy based in Prague; and she was an associate with Pepper, Hamilton & Scheetz in Washington, D.C. Diane is an active member of the American Bar Association’s Legal Analytics and M&S Committees, and she speaks regularly about transactional law and advanced technology.  A graduate of Wesleyan University, she earned her J.D. at the University of Michigan, and she speaks Spanish, Czech, Italian, and French. MEET OUR SPEAKERS Raquel Bracho (A&S '05), Legal Analyst, Bloomberg Law Raquel Bracho is a Legal Analyst on the Transactions team focusing on health transactions and commercial contracts. Raquel has spent more than 10 years drafting, negotiating, and reviewing a broad range of contracts. She has advised corporations and non-profits, including a university, on corporate, healthcare, technology, regulatory, and compliance matters. Raquel is a graduate of the Johns Hopkins University (BA, Public Health) and the University of Maryland Francis King Carey School of Law (JD, certificate in Health Law). Robert Kim (SAIS '95), Legal Analyst, Bloomberg Law Robert Kim is a Legal Analyst with Bloomberg Law covering AML, FinTech, and sanctions issues. Prior to his role with Bloomberg Law, Robert was an associate at Milbank Tweed Hadley & McCloy, a senior counsel on the Securities and Exchange Commission staff, manager of the Bank Secrecy Act enforcement program at the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), and Deputy Treasury Attaché at U.S. Embassy Baghdad. Preston Brewer, Legal Analyst, Bloomberg Law Preston Brewer is a Legal Analyst on the Transactional team, with an emphasis on capital markets, including cryptocurrencies and blockchain.  Previously, he was an Attorney-Adviser with the SEC focusing on biotech IPOs.  His law firm experience includes corporate and securities and debt trading.  Preston has an LL.M. in Securities and Financial Regulation from Georgetown, a JD from USC, and a BA from UC Santa Barbara. Peter Rasmussen, Legal Analyst Bloomberg Industry Group Peter Rasmussen is a Legal Analyst concentrating on corporate transactions and federal securities law, with more than 20 years' experience in the legal research and technology industry. He has a BA from DePauw University, an MA in history from the University of Illinois at Chicago, and a JD from the University of Illinois College of Law, where he served as administrative editor of the University of Illinois Law Review. RESOURCES: ANALYSIS: BITMEX Failures Reinforce Crypto AML Requirements ANALYSIS: Digital Asset Adoption Accelerates in U.S. and Abroad ANALYSIS: New Enforcement Framework Clarifies DOJ Crypto Policy ANALYSIS: Digital Dollar and Foreign Rivals Gain Support in 2020 ANALYSIS: Facebook’s Libra Ducks the SEC, Drawing New Attention ANALYSIS: SEC’s Crypto Conundrum—It’s Innovation v. Regulation ANALYSIS: Gensler Expected to Emphasize SEC Regulatory Role ANALYSIS: Corporate Governance in the Time of Coronavirus ANALYSIS: SEC, FINRA Show Their Hands With 2020 Exam Priorities The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.civilizing-the-blockchain-fronti
 Jun 24, 2021
 12:00 PM
Civilizing the Blockchain Frontier: Moving Toward Governed Cyberspace
 Location
https://www.jhu.edu/hopkinsathome/
Baltimore, MD
HopkinsatHomeJune 30, June 30, WednesdayBrought to you by Hopkins at Home, Hopkins on the Hill, and the Johns Hopkins University Office of ResearchFollow us on Twitter to join the conversation: @HopkinsatHome, #HopkinsatHome ABOUT THE PROGRAM A dashboard known around the world, the COVID-19 Dashboard by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering (CSSE) at Johns Hopkins University was created by Dr. Lauren Gardner and her team at the cusp of the COVID-19 pandemic. Over the last year and a half, the website has grown to be a resource to help advance the understanding of the virus, inform the public, and brief policymakers in order to guide a response, improve care, and save lives. Learn firsthand from the team what it took to create this invaluable resource and how it has evolved throughout time. ABOUT THE PRESENTERS Beth Blauer, JD, is the Executive Director and co-founder of the Centers for Civic Impact at Johns Hopkins University (Civic Impact). As a dedicated public servant and international expert on government performance programs for more than fifteen years, Beth Blauer spent her career working to improve people’s lives by bringing data into governments’ decision-making processes. Blauer founded Civic Impact, originally as the Center for Government Excellence, in 2015 and has since successfully worked with over 140 mayors from around the globe to advance the use of data and evidence. She has built the organization to be a leader in data-driven insights for city leaders and public sector practitioners across the country and around the world. Prior to leading Civic Impact, Blauer designed and launched Socrata’s GovStat platform for federal, state, and local governments. Having entered public service as a juvenile probation officer in Maryland, Blauer was quickly promoted within the department and ultimately became the Chief of Staff. It was in this capacity she began working on the creation and implementation of “StateStat.” In 2008, then Governor Martin O’Malley asked Blauer to lead his nationally recognized StateStat program. Blauer serves as a core team member of the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center.     Lauren Gardner, PhD, is an associate professor of civil and systems engineering and the creator of the interactive web-based dashboard being used by public health authorities, researchers, and the general public around the globe to track the outbreak of the novel coronavirus that has spread worldwide since early January 2020. The dashboard continues to be cited every day by multiple major media outlets and has served as a resource for a number of federal agencies. Since its launch, the dashboard has recorded 200 billion feature requests, which are the number of interactions visitors have with the underlying data available on the site. Dr. Gardner was named one of TIME’s 100 Most Influential People of 2020 for “democratizing data” and filling “a void of public health leadership” during the pandemic. A specialist in the role of mobility in spreading diseases, Gardner’s research expertise is in integrated transport and epidemiological modeling. Beyond mobility, her work focuses more holistically on virus diffusion as a function of climate, land use, and other contributing risk factors.    Tamara Goyea, Senior Data Scientist, Applied Physic Laboratory         Keri N. Althoff, PhD, is the Provost’s Fellow for Research Communication and an associate professor of epidemiology in the Bloomberg School of Public Health and the School of Medicine. As a Provost’s Fellow, she is expanding our institutional capacity to share research achievements. Dr. Althoff's research interest is aging in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. She serves as the co-director of the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD), which is a collaboration of more than 20 longitudinal HIV cohort studies of adults with individual-level harmonized data. She earned her bachelor's degree at the University of Iowa, then her MPH and PhD from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Prior to becoming an accomplished epidemiologist, Dr. Althoff worked in public relations and journalism.   Her skills and passion for sharing research with broad audiences make her the perfect host for Hopkins on the Hill at Home 2021.  The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.  /event/HAHHopontheHill063021
 Jun 30, 2021
 12:00 PM
Hopkins on the Hill: How Do You Track A Pandemic for the Entire World?
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Healthcare Affinity September 23, September 23, ThursdaySponsored by the Healthcare Affinity What is urban agriculture and why is it important? Join us as our panel discusses the benefits, successes, and challenges, including the benefits to nutrition, health, the environment, the economy, and the local community. Learn how urban agriculture is bolstering the well-being and resilience of our cities. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants in advance of the program.  MEET OUR SPEAKERS Julie Buisson (Business '15), Business Operations Manager, SpringForward(TM) J.J. Reidy (Business '15), Founder & CEO, Urban Pastoral Naadiya Hutchinson (A&S '19, Public Health '20), Black Yield Institute MEET OUR MODERATOR Joel Gittelsohn, PhD, Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health Dr. Joel Gittelsohn is a Professor in the Center for Human Nutrition and Global Obesity Prevention Center, International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. Gittelsohn is a public health nutritionist and medical anthropologist, who focuses on developing, implementing and evaluating community-based programs for the primary prevention of chronic disease in disadvantaged ethnic minority populations. With more than 280 publications, Dr. Gittelsohn has led multiple food source-centered intervention trials aimed at improving the food environment and providing education needed to support healthy food choices and reduce obesity and diabetes in Native communities, Baltimore City, and Pacific Islander communities. Dr. Gittelsohn developed a multi-institutional program for diabetes prevention in 7 First Nations in schools and food stores, which has been extended to 11 American Indian communities and includes worksites, social media and policy components. He has conducted a series of intervention trials with corner stores, carryouts, wholesalers, churches, and recreation centers in Baltimore City. These studies have shown success in increasing knowledge, healthy food purchasing and consumption, in reducing obesity, and in improving stocking and sales of healthier foods. Dr. Gittelsohn collaborates with the city of Baltimore to support their efforts to improve the food environment and promote disaster resilience.urban-agriculture-today-economic
 Sep 23, 2021
 12:00 PM
Urban Agriculture Today: Economics, Successes, and Challenges
 Ticket Options
Alumni & GuestsFREE
Healthcare Affinity September 30, September 30, ThursdaySponsored by the Healthcare Affinity and the Johns Hopkins Alternative Protein Project Join us as we discuss the emerging area of alternative proteins and their impacts on the future of the food industry, public health, the environment, economics, social well-being, and more! Our panel will discuss this emerging sustainable food system and its future. This program will be presented on Zoom. A link will be shared with all registrants in advance of the program. MEET OUR SPEAKERS Liz Specht (Engineering '09), Director of Science and Technology, The Good Food Institute Liz works to identify and forecast areas of technological need within the alternative protein field. Her efforts also catalyze research to address these needs while supporting researchers in academia and industry to move the field forward. Liz has a bachelor’s degree in chemical and biomolecular engineering from Johns Hopkins University, a doctorate in biological sciences from the University of California San Diego, and postdoctoral research experience from the University of Colorado Boulder. Prior to joining GFI in 2016, Liz had accumulated a decade of academic research experience in synthetic biology, recombinant protein expression, and development of genetic tools. She is a firm believer in the power of technology to enable us to meet growing food demands in a sustainable way. Adam Bergman (A&S '95), Managing Director, EcoTech Capital Adam Bergman is Managing Director of EcoTech Capital, a boutique investment bank at the intersection of technology innovation and climate change. Adam is a sustainability executive leader with almost 25 years’ experience raising capital and executing M&A transactions. He also provides strategic advice and financial guidance to senior executives and boards on strategic partnerships and growth strategies. As one of the first investment bankers to focus exclusively on the CleanTech sector, starting in 2005, Adam is recognized as a leading subject matter expert and is a frequent speaker at industry events and publisher of articles on sustainability. He has extensive transaction experience working on financings and M&A globally, including deals in the AgTech & FoodTech, biomaterials, energy efficiency, energy storage, Industrial IoT, mobility & transportation, renewable energy, smart grid and water technology sectors. During the last six years, Adam built an industry leading AgTech & FoodTech investment banking practice creating a broad ecosystem to help drive adoption of technology and innovation throughout the broad food & ag value chain. Additionally, Adam established the AgTech cohort for Wells Fargo’s innovation incubator (IN2), which was launched at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center in St. Louis, MO, in 2018. Over the past 20+ years, he has worked for leading global investment banks, including Deutsche Bank, Jefferies, JPMorgan, Rothschild, UBS and Wells Fargo, and has completed over $12 billion in domestic and international financings and over $25 billion in domestic and cross border M&A, restructuring and strategic advisory transactions. Adam has a B.A. in Political Science from Johns Hopkins University, where he was inducted into Phi Beta Kappa. Additionally, he holds an M.A. in International Development from the International University of Japan. Adam lives in San Francisco, California with his wife and two children. Becky Ramsing (Public Health '99), Senior Program Officer, Food & Community Public Health, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Becky is a senior program officer with the Food Communities and Public Health Program, primarily responsible for managing the Center’s science advisory role with the Meatless Monday Campaign. At CLF, she overseas research, communication, evaluation and programming that facilitate a shift sustainable, healthy diets that are plant-centric and lower in meat. Linking nutrition with agriculture has been a focus of her passion and work over the past years­––from working with local farmers and food suppliers, to promoting consumption of local foods, to helping resource limited families here and abroad access fresh, affordable food. Becky believes good nutrition for everyone relies first on a healthy food system. In the same way, addressing hunger and food security within the scope of agriculture cannot be separate from nutrition.  Becky is active as a board chair of Aids Orphan Education Trust, which supports a Ugandan organization serving orphans and vulnerable families. She is an avid runner and is passionate about all things vegetable—from soil to table—and loves gardening, cooking and eating. Raychel Santo (A&S '14), Senior Program Coordinator, Food Production & Public Health, Food Communities & Public Health, Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future Raychel is a Senior Research Program Coordinator with two programs at the Center: the Food Production and Public Health program and the Food Communities and Public Health program. In this role, she works on a variety of projects related to local/regional food policy councils and governance (through the Food Policy Networks project), the relationship between diet and climate change, urban agriculture, and institutional food procurement. Originally from Dayton, Ohio, Raychel’s interests in preventive health, environmental sustainability, and community empowerment began with her discovery of the sustainable food movement. As an undergraduate at Johns Hopkins, she immersed herself in academic and research pursuits to learn more about this emerging field. Double-majoring in Public Health and Global Environmental Change & Sustainability, Raychel directed her studies to better understand how pesticides, toxicants, and environmental conditions affect human and ecological health. She learned about the physical effects and psychological influences of our diets; how climate change will affect local, regional, and global food production and security; and the social and political implications of various food policies. During this time, she worked with the CLF as a student research assistant (2010 to 2013) and as a full-time program coordinator (2014 to 2015), gaining a more critical eye toward understanding the complexity of creating systemic solutions to our food-related issues. After completing her Master’s degree in Food, Space & Society at Cardiff University School of Geography & Planning with the support of the US-UK Fulbright Commission, Raychel returned to the CLF full-time in spring 2017. Raychel extends her passions to extracurricular life as well. She co-founded Real Food Hopkins, a chapter of the national Real Food Challenge student movement committed to bringing local/community-based, ecologically sound, humanely raised, and fair food to the JHU campus and surrounding Baltimore area. In addition to organizing food advocacy and awareness events, the group was instrumental in getting the University to commit to purchasing at least 35 percent “real” food by 2020. An avid gardener at the Blue Jay's Perch Community Garden, she can often be found there weeding, digging, and chatting on the weekends. She also enjoys cooking, yoga, hiking, and playing cards and board games. MEET OUR MODERATOR Lauren Blake, Biophysics PhD Candidate, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health | Co-founder, JHU Alternative Protein Project Disclaimer: The perspectives and opinions expressed by the speaker(s) during this program are those of the speaker(s) and not, necessarily, those of Johns Hopkins University and the scheduling of any speaker at an alumni event or program does not constitute the University’s endorsement of the speaker’s perspectives and opinions.alternative-proteins-the-future-
 Sep 30, 2021
 12:00 PM
Alternative Proteins & The Future of Food