Events - Odyssey

 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 04, October 4, MondayBrought to you by Odyssey October 4, 2021 - November 8, 2021 Mondays, 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM ET (9 course hours) Explore the art and life of Georgia O’Keeffe. From her early years, exhibitions in New York, encounters with Alfred Stieglitz, and her many travels; see how these experiences influenced her art.  A detailed critical analysis of her work is also provided including: the enlarged flowers; the barns; the series of crosses; the landscapes, and the skulls.  There will be lively discussion and questions with rich images and Power Point Presentations.   About the Instructor Joseph Paul Cassar, PhD, is an artist, art historian, curator and educator. He studied at the Accademia di Belle Arti, Pietro Vannucci, Perugia, Italy, the School of Art in Malta (Europe), and at Charles Sturt University in NSW, Australia. He lectures at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC, The Renaissance Institute, Towson University, and Johns Hopkins University, among others.    Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated.     georgia-o-keeffe-the-mother-of-a
 Oct 04, 2021
 06:30 PM
Georgia O’Keeffe: The Mother of American Modernism
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore , MD
Odyssey Virtual October 04, October 4, MondayBrought to you by Odyssey October 4, 2021 - December 6, 2021 Mondays, 6:30 PM - 8:15 PM ET (21 course hours) Write that novel you've been dreaming about, with support and guidance. This registration is for the first part of a two-semester course. The course is designed for students to have the option to take either semester or both. Students will receive feedback from each other and the instructor on outlines and excerpts of their work in progress. The course will also address next steps for revising and publishing novels. Students may follow course goals to finish half of a novel in each semester or find their own pace. National Novel Writing Month participants and memoirists are welcome to join.  Syllabus  Session 1 10/04/21  Introductions  To NaNoWriMo or not to NaNoWrimo?  What makes a good novel/memoir concept?   Discussion of genre and age category  Overview of plotting resources, plotting vs. planning  Objectives: Students will begin to plan which novel/memoir idea they will work on this semester and explore the processes they may use to write the novel. Students will identify which genre/age category fits their idea. Students will explore different mechanisms of planning and drafting a novel.   Session 2 10/11/21  Writing goals: One short concept & decision on what plotting resource you will be using  Discussion of what makes a good critique  Each student’s concept will be critiqued in class  Discussion of plotting resources  Objectives: Students will give and receive feedback on their novel concepts and assess what may need to be changed before outlining. Students will expand their writing toolboxes by learning about each other’s plotting processes. Students will become more skilled at giving and receiving critiques.   Session 3 10/18/21  Due: 2-10 page outline of your novel, if you’re interested in outlining  Workshop for 4 students’ outlines  Discussion of drafting and revision processes  Objectives: Students will learn about what makes a good outline and get ideas for what they may need to revise about their outlines. Students will learn about practical ways to write book-length stories.   Session 4 10/25/21  Writing goal: 5,000 words  Excerpt workshop for 4 students  What makes a good beginning?   Objectives: Students will learn strategies for writing a compelling novel beginning. Students will give and receive feedback on each other’s work.  Session 5 11/1/21  Writing goal: 10,000 words  Excerpt workshop for 4 students  What makes a good scene/chapter?  Objective: Students will explore strategies for writing propulsive scenes and chapters. Students will give and receive feedback on each other’s work.  Session 6 11/8/21  Writing Goal: 15,000 words  Excerpt workshop for 4 students  Character arc and agency  Objective: Students will analyze what makes an active character who grows and changes and strategize about how to make their own protagonists compelling. Students will give and receive feedback on each other’s work.  Session 7 11/15/21  Writing Goal: 20,000 words  Excerpt workshop for 4 students  Fulfilling the promise of the premise   Objectives: Students will analyze how to keep the implicit promise they made to readers with the concept of their book in its execution. Students will brainstorm ideas for how to do this specifically in their books. Students will give and receive feedback on each other’s work.  Session 8 11/22/21  Writing Goal: 25,000 words  Excerpt workshop for 4 students  Writing the murky middle  Objectives: Students will analyze typical plot structure for the middle of the novels and plan for the middle of their own novels. Students will also discuss the emotional and psychological challenges that come with writing the middle of a novel. Students will give and receive feedback on each other’s work.  Session 9 11/29/21  Writing Goal: 30,000 words  Excerpt workshop for 4 students  Discussion of revision/querying/submission/self-publishing  Objectives: Students will discuss what’s next after they are finished drafting their novels and explore strategies for revising and pursuing publication. Students will give and receive feedback on each other’s work.  Session 10 12/6/21  Writing Goal: 35,000 words  Excerpt workshop for 4 students  Goal setting for break/future   Objectives: Students will reflect on their work this semester and set goals for the future of this particular novel and their careers as writers. Students will give and receive feedback on each other’s work. Instructions for Submitting Work for Workshop For each workshop, students will submit a 250-500 word excerpt from their novel which will be read aloud and critiqued during class. Students who would like to give and receive more feedback may form optional small critique groups outside of class. Students will decide whether to sign up for small critique groups by the second class. Instructions for Submitting Work to Tracy Tracy will read and give feedback on up to 5,000 words of your work at the time of your choosing or shortly after the start of the semester. Tracy suggests submitting the beginning of the book, as other sections will lack context. If students would like suggestions on a specific type of scene (action, romance, dialogue-heavy), they may choose to ask for that instead.  Formatting Follow William Shunn’s formatting guide here, except use Times New Roman Supplemental Materials If you can’t get copies of either of the below books, do not worry. Tracy recommends choosing a resource to help guide your plotting/drafting process, but there are more than just the two texts, including free online resources, which will be discussed in class. Save the Cat! Writes a Novel: The Last Book on Novel Writing You'll Ever Need  by Jessica Brody, ISBN-10: 0399579745 ISBN-13: 978-0399579745, recommended  Story Engineering by Larry Brooks, ISBN-13: 978-1582979984 ISBN-10: 1582979987 About the Instructor         Tracy C. Gold (MFA), is a freelance editor and teacher. She taught writing for many years at the University of Baltimore. While working for literary agent Carrie Pestritto, Tracy read thousands of queries and dozens of prospective client manuscripts. She also worked with Carrie’s clients on manuscripts and marketing plans. Tracy has two picture books forthcoming in 2021, Everyone's Sleepy but the Baby from Familius, and Trick or Treat, Bugs to Eat from Sourcebooks eXplore. Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated. writing-your-novel-
 Oct 04, 2021
 06:30 PM
Writing Your Novel
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 04, October 4, MondayBrought to you by Odyssey October 4, 2021 - November 8, 2021 Mondays, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM ET (9 course hours) In the last 4000 years scientists have toiled in their laboratories and observatories, at their desks and in the field to gradually elucidate the story of creation and evolution adding to its expanse and detail. Yet as marvelous a story of creation and evolution is, the chapters are replete with gaps and deep mystery; some perhaps impenetrable, given the limitations imposed upon us by physical law. It is within these uncharted waters beyond the shores of science that the ineffable glides. This course explores the unknown and perhaps unknowable chapters; with a focus on understanding the physical theories describing the structure of the cosmos identifying those areas not yet understood.     Suggested Readings The Fabric of the Cosmos – Brian Greene – An overview of modern physics and cosmology  Einstein – Walter Isaacson – A view of Einstein’s life, Special and General Relativity   Genius – James Gleick – The life and Science of Richard Feynman – Quantum Electrodynamics  The View from the Center of the Universe – Joel R. Primack and Nancy Ellen Abrams – An overview of Modern Physics and its Philosophical Implications  Einstein’s God- Krista Tippit – Conversations and Science and the Human Spirit  Man Is Not Alone – Abraham Joshua Heschel – Philosophy of Religion About the Instructor              Forrest Hall, PhD, worked for NASA for more than 35 years and the University of Maryland Baltimore County for 15 years. He has authored more than 80 scientific papers. He recently retired from the UMBC Physics Department but continues to teach astronomy and Earth Science at Baltimore's Maryland Institute College of Art. He lectures widely on the connections between science, spirituality, and ecology. Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated.     survey-of-the-grandest-theories-
 Oct 04, 2021
 07:00 PM
Survey of the Grandest Theories in Physics
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 05, October 5, TuesdayBrought to you by Odyssey October 5, 2021 - November 2, 2021  Tuesday, 6:30 PM ET (7.5 course hours) This course is an alternative to a writing workshop where participants critique each other’s writing: a practicum focusing on sentence-level improvement. Using a method the co-instructors developed called “the sentence-composing approach,” participants practice sentence strategies used by authors ranging from J. R. R. Tolkien to J. K. Rowling. In building better sentences, participants learn to do what successful authors do, and will leave each session with sentence-building tools applicable to almost any kind of writing--academic, business, literary, or personal.   Session 1 10/05/21   Description: To learn a technique replicating the structure of a mentor sentence by a recognizable author.  Objectives: Participants will analyze sentences by recognizable authors to learn the sentence-composing tools used therein to build those sentences and to compose sentences with those same tools.  Session 2  10/12/21   Description: The identifier sentence-composing tool is defined through analysis of mentor sentences by authors containing that tool and its variations.  Objectives: Participants will be able to use the identifier tool in various places and lengths within their own sentences.  Session 3  10/19/21   Description: The describer sentence-composing tool is defined through analysis of mentor sentences by authors containing that tool and its variations.  Objectives: Participants will be able to use the describer tool in various places and lengths within their own sentences.  Session 4  10/26/21   Description: The elaborator sentence-composing tool is defined through analysis of mentor sentences by authors containing that tool and its variations.  Objectives: Participants will be able to use the elaborator tool in various places and lengths within their own sentences.  Session 5  11/02/21   Description: The combo sentence-composing tool is defined through analysis of mentor sentences by authors containing a mixture of sentence-composing tools.  Objectives: Participants will be able to use identifiers, describers, and elaborators in combination within their own sentences.   Supplemental Materials  All materials are created by the Killgallons, provided during each session, then emailed to participants to use and keep. About the Instructors             The co-instructors are widely recognized as innovators in teaching writing through sentence-level improvement. As co-authors, they have written many textbooks used by teachers within and beyond the United States, all featuring their sentence-composing approach.  Don Killgallon, M.A. (University of Maryland), M.L.A. and M.Ed. (Johns Hopkins University), is a veteran English and writing teacher, and the originator of the sentence- composing approach.  Jenny Killgallon, M.L.A. (Johns Hopkins University), taught secondary English in public and private schools and was a writing improvement specialist for the Maryland State Department of Education and for the English Division of Baltimore County Public Schools.  Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated.   improving-writing-using-a-senten
    SOLD OUT
 Oct 05, 2021
 06:30 PM
Improving Writing Using a “Sentence Composing Approach” 
 Location
Virtual Via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 06, October 6, WednesdayBrought to you by Odyssey October 6, 2021 - November 10, 2021 Wednesdays, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM ET (9 course hours) Current US democracy has been fractured by polarization and tribalism. The new normal of today’s politics is being influenced by the mass and immediate communications of the digital age. In this course, we will examine the roles of polarization & denialism in current US politics. We ask, “How strong are the forces of reason, culture and history to influence politics?” Finally, we explore influences as they shape cultural and historical changes while examining and debating the ways in which the personal and collective realization of civic virtues and the serious, thoughtful and committed pursuit of the common good --that will benefit all members of society-- have the power to prevent the future destabilization of democracy. Plus the belief that the improvement of democracy will be our permanent task. This course emphasizes active participation, autonomy-promoting education, and reasonable discussion. Session 1 10/6 Introduction Objective: Understanding the main elements of US democracy. Session 2 10/13 Motivated Reasoning & Denialism Objective: Analyzing the psychology of motivated reasoning and emotional denial. Session 3 10/20 Politics and Economics of Polarization Objective: Examining the political and economic factors of displaced working people. Session 4 10/27 From Nov. 2020 election to Jan. 6 2021 Riot Objective: Discussion of the GOP attempts to delegitimize the results of the presidential election. Session 5 11/03 Weakness and Strengths of the US democracy Objective: Discussion of the realities and possibilities intrinsic to the US constitutional system. Session 6 11/10 The Future of New Civics Objective: Discussing the need for the virtues of citizenship Supplemental  Materials Suggested reading, It's Even Worse Than It Looks by Norman Ornstein & Thomas Man, 2016, 2nd Ed., Basic Books. If access is available, read the daily politics section of The New York Times and The Washington Post.  About the Instructor             José López-González, holds a BA in Economics from the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon, Monterrey Mexico; MA in Economics from Williams College, Massachusetts; and MA and PhD in Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University. He is an economist, philosopher, and lecturer. He has worked as an Economist at the Investment Bank Financiera Aceptaciones and at the Mexican Federal Reserve Bank, both in Mexico City, Mexico. Dr. Lopez-Gonzalez taught philosophy in the Department of Philosophy at Loyola University for seven years and has been faculty in the Departments of Philosophy and Political Science at Towson University since 1996, teaching courses in Philosophy, politics, economics, and Latin America. Since 2010, he has been teaching interdisciplinary courses in philosophy, politics and economics as a lecturer at the Odyssey Program at Johns Hopkins University, and since 2014 at several campuses of the Baltimore County Community College. Dr. Lopez-Gonzalez is a Lecturer in the new program at the Alumni Relations Office at Johns Hopkins University. He has published articles in philosophy and economics and took courses in Micro and Macroeconomics at Harvard University. Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated.   -teetering-on-the-brink-of-demis
 Oct 06, 2021
 07:00 PM
Teetering on the Brink of Demise: Reevaluating US Democracy
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 07, October 7, ThursdayBrought to you by Odyssey October 7, 2021 - November 11, 2021  Thursday, 6:30 PM ET (9 course hours) This class will introduce students to the science of climate change through explorations of the archaeological remains of the great civilizations of the Americas. The rich archeological record left behind by the Olmec, the Maya, the Aztec and the Inca, have over the last few decades, given scholars great insights into how they used their environments and how in doing so, influenced the ecology of the Americas. The Maya in particular produced huge cities whose need for water and resources outpaced in many instances the ability of the environment to provide them. Students will explore the archaeological remains of these cultures from the early Americas through 3D models of objects, inscriptions and works of art and through readings aimed at building an understanding of the science of both past and present climate change. Syllabus Session 1: 10/7, Introduction to Climate Science and the Archaeology of the Americas Session 2: 10/14, Maya Civilization and the Paleoecology of the Ancient Americas Session 3: 10/21, Indigenous Perspectives on Environment and Climate amongst the ancient Maya, Nahua, and the Cahuilla. Session 4: 10/28, What can the archaeological record of the disappearance of classic Maya cities tells us about climate change Session 5: 11/4, Impact of climate change on the collapse of Lowland Maya Civilization Session 6: 11/11, How does the archaeological record of the effects of climate change influence how we think about it today. Supplemental Materials Students will be provided with readings for the each class as attachments a week before the lecture associated with the reading as listed below: Week 2: Twenty-first century approaches to ancient problems: Climate and Society by Jade A. d’Alpoim Guedes, Stefani A. Crabtree, R. Kyle Bocinsky and Timothy A. Kohler. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 113(51) (2016) 14483-14491. Week 3: Classic Period collapse of the Central Maya Lowlands: Insights about human–environment relationships for sustainability by B. L. Turner II, and Jeremy A. Sabloff PNAS 109(35) (2012) 13908-13914. Week 4: Impacts of Climate Change on the Collapse of Lowland Maya Civilization by Peter M.J. Douglas, Arthur A. Demarest, Mark Brenner, and Marcello A. Canuto. Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Science 44 (2016) 613-45 Week 5: Drought, agricultural adaptation, and sociopolitical collapse in the Maya Lowlands by Peter M. J. Douglas, et. al, PNAS 112(18) (2015) 5607-5612. Week 6: Quantification of drought during the collapse of the classic Maya civilization Nicholas P. Evans, et.al, Science 361 (2018) 498-501. About the Instructor            When not climbing in the Alps, searching for rare plants in the desert, or mountain biking through some jungle, John Hessler is the curator of the Jay I. Kislak Collection of the Archaeology and History of the Early Americas at the Library of Congress, and a lecturer at the Rare Book School, at the University of Virginia, teaching the linguistics of the Mesoamerican Codex. He is the author of more than one hundred articles and books on archaeology and exploration, including the New York Times bestseller, MAP: Exploring the World, and his work has been featured in many media outlets including the New York Times, Washington Post, the BBC, CBS News and NPR’s All Things Considered. His most recent book, Collecting for a New World, examines the history of the archaeological collections at the Library of Congress, where he also writes the Excavating Archaeology Series for the blog, Worlds Revealed. Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated. archaeology-and-climate-change-i
 Oct 07, 2021
 06:30 PM
Archaeology and Climate Change in the Americas
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore , MD
Odyssey Virtual October 18, October 18, MondayBrought to you by Odyssey October 18, 2021 - November 22, 2021  Monday, 6:30 PM ET (12 course hours)  Anyone who believes that short stories differ from novels only in length has never read a great short story.  During the past 12 years, this course has remained extremely popular, with many of the same great authors, but different stories.  In this fall’s course, we will enjoy works by Anton Chekhov, Guy de Maupassant, Kate Chopin, D.H. Lawrence, Edgar Allen Poe, James Joyce, O’ Henry, Katherine Mansfield, Mark Twain and others.  Discussions will focus on character, plot, theme, setting, and atmosphere as well as historical/cultural contexts, but, above all, on artistry.  Session 1 10/18/21  Introduction: Ingredients in a Short Story.  “Last Train to Rosemont” by Susan Richards Shreve (to be given out online).  “Appointment in Samarra” by Somerset Maugham (to be given out online)  “Squire Patrick’s Lady” by Thomas Hardy  Theme: Irony  Session 2 10.25/21  “A Malefactor” by Anton Chekhov, “The Broken Boot” by John Galsworthy, “The Necklace” by Guy De Maupassant  Theme: Class Differences  Session 3 11/1/21  ”Desiree’s Baby” by Kate Chopin                   “Second Best” by D.H. Lawrence   “The Masque of the Red Death” by E.A. Poe   Theme: Arrogance and Hypocrisy  Session 4 11/8/21   “A Pair of Silk Stockings” by Kate Chopin “Eveline” by James Joyce  “Gooseberries” by Anton Chekhov    Theme: A Life of Dreams  Session 5 11/15/21                                  “Young Goodman Brown” by Nathaniel Hawthorne    “The Selfish Giant” by Oscar Wilde  “The Gift of the Magi” by O’ Henry  Theme: Religious Symbolism  Session 6 11/22/21                                                   “The Lightening Rod Man” by Herman Melville  “The Notorious Jumping Frog” by Mark Twain  “Germans at Meat” by Katherine Mansfield         Theme: Humor and Gullibility Supplemental Materials Text: 100 Great Short Stories, James Daley, editor, Dover Thrift Edition OR in other collections you may already own OR online and you can print them out.   About the Instructor               Lynne Agress, PhD., has taught at Johns Hopkins University, Smith, and Goucher Colleges, and the University of Maryland.  She was president of BWB-Business and Legal Writing, Inc. and still conducts writing and editing workshops for companies.  She is the author of THE FEMININE IRONY and WORKING WITH WORDS,  as well as numerous articles in magazines and newspapers.  For the past 10 years, she has been writing opinion pieces for THE BALTIMORE SUN. Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.   While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated. great-writers-in-small-doses-the
Only 4 left
 Oct 18, 2021
 06:30 PM
Great Writers in Small Doses: The Short Story
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 21, October 21, ThursdayBrought to you by Odyssey October 21, 2021 - October 28, 2021 Thursdays, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM ET (3 course hours) Hollywood loves lawyers. And Hollywood loves judges, jurors, surprise witnesses, smoking guns and falsely accused heroes, as well. Perhaps one of the reasons courtroom dramas are so reliable is that they follow a time-honored protocol. Whether they’re plaintiffs or defendants, we’re on the side of a plucky upstart who needs the help of a determined legal hand to fight injustice. Usually, it’s not just the characters being put on trial, either. It’s the establishment, the system, the country, the past, and the future. No wonder there are so many memorable courtroom dramas. Yale film professor Marc Lapadula will be discussing and analyzing a broad lineup of the best and most compelling movie entries in this genre. Movies will include: Judgment At Nuremberg, Witness For The Prosecution, Inherit the Wind, 12 Angry Men, Anatomy of a Murder, To Kill A Mockingbird, And Justice For All, The Verdict, The Accused, My Cousin Vinny, Philadelphia, Erin Brockovich and A Few Good Men. About the Instructor               Marc Lapadula is a Senior Lecturer in Film And Media Studies at Yale University where he runs and teaches the screenwriting program. He is a playwright, screenwriter and an award-winning film producer. In addition to Yale, Marc has taught at Columbia University’s Graduate Film School. He also created the screenwriting programs at both The University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins where he won Outstanding Teaching awards. He has been invited to lecture on a wide range of classic and contemporary films across America as well as in cities in Canada, England and Mexico. His acclaimed presentations have been at many notable venues like The National Press Club, The Smithsonian Institution, The Guthrie Theater, The Commonwealth Club, The Cleveland Museum of Art, The Toronto Jewish Film Festival, The New York Historical Society and The Festival of Ideas in Mexico City to name only a few. He produced ANGEL PASSING, starring Hume Cronyn and Teresa Wright. The film premiered at The Sundance Film Festival and won, among many other awards, the grand prize at Worldfest Houston. Other movies he produced include MENTOR, starring Rutger Hauer, which premiered at The Tribeca Film Festival. Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated. great-courtroom-dramas
 Oct 21, 2021
 07:00 PM
Great Courtroom Dramas
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 26, October 26, TuesdayBrought to you by Odyssey October 26, 2021 - December 7, 2021 Tuesdays, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM ET (9 course hours) As a consequence of the election of Barack Obama, race and racism were neatly packaged into a post-racial America didactic.  The Trump era however, has ushered in a new “lost cause” narrative in which a sense of diminished overrepresentation has become the dog whistle for returning America to better days.  This course uses a developing structural understanding of race relations to examine the strange enigma of race in 20th century and contemporary American democracy.  What Eduardo Bonilla-Silva describes in his book, Racism without Racists, as “The Sweet (but deadly) Enchantment of Color Blindness in Black Face”, will provide the analyses by which we can fully examine America.  This includes the backlash to support of Black Lives Matter campaigns, marches, and protests against disparate treatment of individuals across race, gender, ethnic/cultural lines culminating in the events of January 6th 2021, attacks on education, and other recent unconstitutional legislation. We also touch on certain nuances of our selection process for the Supreme Court and some important cases (Dred Scott, Plessy, Ozawa, Thind, Lim, Scottsboro, McClesky) in addition to certain events such as Rosewood, Emmett Till, Brown v. The Board of Education and its progeny, Wilmington and Tulsa incidents etc.    Session 1 10/26 What kind do we have? Judicial Branch in a Nutshell; Role of SCOTUS, Selection Process/Bias; Structural Discrimination. Session 2 11/2 Defining Whiteness: The Race Cases; Voter Suppression; Indifference to Hate: Groveland Four, Scottsboro, Emmettt Till, McClesky, Central Park 5. Session 3 11/9 The Capitol Lynching: Decoding America’s Intention. Session 4 11/16 Freedom Schools; Efforts to Destroy Public Education; Supreme Injustices; The Roberts Court. Session 5 11/30   Stories That Aren’t Told: Erasure, Marginalization and government complicity/Roundtable Discussion I/Student Presentations (individual or group). Session 6  12/7 Roundtable Discussion II/Student Presentations (individual or group).   Required Readings https://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1052&context=uclf  https://opencommons.uconn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1116&context=law_review  https://newrepublic.com/article/160654/trump-supporters-white-supremacy-appeasement  https://level.medium.com/breonna-taylor-and-bearing-witness-to-black-womens-expendability-472abf5f6cee  https://www.essence.com/news/state-violence-police-black-women-say-her-name/    About the Instructor Ernest J. Quarles is an attorney, intersectional critical race researcher, and historian who teaches at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. His courses focus on deficits in America’s storytelling, erased and marginalized histories, and U.S. racial history. Within those spaces, his methodology embraces intersectional frames and other critical lenses and, in so doing, enables truly transformational learning. Quarles began his study of race matters under the late Hon. Leon A. Higginbotham while studying at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He is also a graduate of Brown University.  He currently sits on the board of The African American Policy Forum and works on several initiatives which impact and support the development of truth narratives to counteract mainstream narratives about race and social justice.  This unique space has enabled him to provide students with a more holistic view of the world that is rooted in empathy and a view of research that informs social activism as a moral imperative.  Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated. While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated.   supreme-indifference-the-myth-of
 Oct 26, 2021
 07:00 PM
Supreme Indifference: The Myth of American Democracy
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 28, October 28, ThursdayBrought to you by Odyssey October 28, 2021 Thursday, 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM ET (2 course hours) Join us for an evening with Steven David, as we dive into the threat of nuclear proliferation. During this talk, Dr. David will focus on the threat posed by nuclear proliferation with a special emphasis on Iran. We will explore the reasons that countries seek to develop nuclear weapons, how they might do so, and the American non-proliferation policy. Together, we will consider the issue of nuclear terrorism, with special emphasis on American efforts preventing Iran from becoming a nuclear weapons state. About the Instructor         Steven R. David, PhD, is a professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University where he has been teaching for over thirty years. David's focus is on international security issues with an emphasis on the Middle East. He has written several books and numerous articles that have appeared in national publications. Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.   While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated. the-threat-posed-by-the-spread-o
 Oct 28, 2021
 06:00 PM
The Threat Posed by the Spread of Nuclear Weapons
 Location
Annapolis, MD
Odyssey Virtual October 30, October 30, SaturdayBrought to you by Odyssey October 30, 2021 Saturday, 9:00 AM ET (3 course hours) Want to feel like a midshipman for a day? “Mini Academy” is back! On October 19, 1781, British General Charles Cornwallis surrendered to General George Washington, Commander-in-Chief of the United States Continental Army, effectively ending the military portion of the Revolutionary War, although limited hostilities would continue as the political path to American independence took almost three additional years. Annapolis played a prominent role in many key events both preceding and following the Battle of Yorktown as an emerging nation struggled to meet the obligations of the subsequent Treaty of Paris. The city served as the first peacetime capital of the United States, where Congress accepted George Washington’s resignation as Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army and ratified the Treaty of Paris. Congress also made two crucial appointments: Thomas Jefferson as a trade minister to France and John Jay as Secretary of Foreign Affairs. Join us to analyze the historical significance of the Battle of Yorktown and its aftermath, including how Annapolis connected the Revolution to the Constitution. 9:00 -10:30 a.m. Session 1: The Siege of Yorktown   This battle was a critical turning point in the Revolution; it convinced the British it was impossible to retain the American colonies through war. In October 1781, combined French and American forces under General George Washington and the Comte de Rochambeau surrounded a British army led by Lord Cornwallis, leading to the surrender of over 7,000 soldiers, a major part of a much larger campaign that carried the war as far afield as the West Indies and the English Channel as well as closer to home. Annapolis served as a crucial staging post for French soldiers camped on the grounds of St. John's College and was thus an important component of the defeat of the British Empire in America. Matthew Dziennik, PhD, University of Edinburgh, is an Associate Professor of British and British Imperial History in the Department of History at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis and is the author of The Fatal Land: War, Empire, and the Highland Soldier in British America (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).  He previously served as a guide at the National Colonial Battlefield Park in Yorktown and is currently working on a book about military recruitment in the British Empire.   10:45 a.m. -12:15 pm - Session 2: The Treaty of Paris   Almost two years after the Siege of Yorktown, the Treaty of Paris was signed on September 3, 1783. Many believe this treaty simply ended the war, and it did, but it also kicked off a difficult and violent four-year period often overlooked in the history books, where a broke Congress could not meet its domestic or international financial obligations as mandated by the treaty. After multiple but ultimately futile attempts to overcome seemingly insurmountable obstacles, a key meeting in Annapolis that met as Shays’ Rebellion was underway convinced many key founders that the Articles of Confederation must be replaced with an entirely new Constitution. Annapolis as a city—and Maryland as a state—were center stage as the United States struggled to meet its responsibilities as a newly sovereign nation. Mark Croatti, MA, University of Southern California, is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, teaching courses on the U.S. Constitution, Comparative Politics, and International Relations.   About the Instructors     Mark Croatti, MA, University of Southern California, is an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Political Science at the United States Naval    Academy in Annapolis, teaching courses on the U.S. Constitution, Comparative Politics, and International Relations. Matthew Dziennik, PhD, University of Edinburgh, is an Associate Professor of British and British Imperial History in the Department of History  at the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis and is the author of The Fatal Land: War, Empire, and the Highland Soldier in British    America (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2015).  He previously served as a guide at the National Colonial Battlefield Park in Yorktown and is currently working on a book about military recruitment in the British Empire.   Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated. mini-academy-annapolis-and-the-2
 Oct 30, 2021
 09:00 AM
*NOW A Virtual Event*| "Annapolis and the 240th Anniversary of the Battle of Yorktown- British, American, and French Perspectives"
 Location
Virtual Via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual November 01, November 1, MondayBrought to you by Odyssey November  1, 2021 - November 29, 2021 (no class November 15) Mondays, 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM ET (6 course hours) This course discusses the dramatic conflict between the Supreme Court and the New Deal. The history of the Supreme Court’s hostility to social and economic reforms, the conflict with the New Deal, and the court packing crisis is also examined. Syllabus:   Session 1   The development of classical legal thought and the Court’s hostility to social reform, the coming of the Great Depression, and the eve of the New Deal Session 2  The Supreme Court, its opposition to New Deal reforms,  and the election of 1936. Session 3  The court packing proposal and the campaigns, for and against.   This class will include a reenactment of portions of the Congressional testimony on the bill. Session 4   The Constitutional Revolution of 1937, the switch in time that saved nine, remaking the Supreme Court and aftermath. Objective:   The participants will come away with a greater understanding of a pivotal moment in American political and constitutional history, and sense of the complex interplay between politics, policy and the law.  About the Instructor Hon. Stephen J. Sfekas, is a Senior Judge of the Circuit Court for Baltimore City. He received his bachelor's degree in international relations from Georgetown University, an M.A. in history from Yale University and his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center. Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated.    -the-new-deal-and-the-supreme-co
 Nov 01, 2021
 06:30 PM
The New Deal and the Supreme Court: Law, Politics and Packing the Court
 Location
Virtual via Zoom
Baltimore, MD
Odyssey Virtual November 03, November 3, WednesdayBrought to you by Odyssey November 3, 2021 - December 8, 2021 Wednesdays, 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM ET (9 course hours) Field shoot 12/4 at the Baltimore Museum of Art (or sculpture garden) In this 6-session class, learn the basics of getting the most out of your iPhone’s camera. Through virtual "in-class" demos and exercises, you will discover image capture techniques specific to the iPhone’s native camera, and learn how to organize and share your photos with family and friends. You’ll also learn simple photo editing techniques using Apple’s native Photos app to bring out the best in your photos. This course is ideal for the casual photographer interested in an introduction to iPhone Photography.  Students will need to have an iPhone 7, or newer, running the most current operating system, should have a good understanding of their iPhone, and will need to purchase approximately $8.00 in apps for this course.  About the Instructor             Karen Klinedinst (BFA), is a landscape photographer and graphic designer based in Baltimore, Maryland. Since 2011, she has been using her iPhone and iPad exclusively to photograph and express the landscape. Her landscapes have been exhibited widely, including: Massoni Art Gallery, Adkins Arboretum, Maryland Art Place, Soho Photo Gallery, among others. Her work is in the collection of the National Park Service, and numerous private collections.   Tuition Remission and Refund Policies Full-time JHU faculty/staff, their spouses or same-sex domestic partners, JHU retirees and their spouses or same-sex domestic partners are eligible for tuition remission. The tuition remission form is required. All tuition remission forms and details on eligibility can be found here and should be returned to odyssey@jhu.edu.  After registration, tuition remission eligibility will be confirmed by the Odyssey registrar. If eligibility cannot be confirmed, you will be required to pay full tuition for the course. Under the terms of the University’s remission program, Hopkins employees must withdraw in writing at least five working days before the first class to receive a 100% refund. No partial refunds are given to JHU employees and affiliates.   Please visit the registration and policies page for more information.  While participating in on-campus events and meetings, participants must follow all public health guidelines required by Johns Hopkins University and Medicine at the time of the event. If you are not fully vaccinated, we require that you wear a face covering during your visit to campus, even when it is no longer required for those who are vaccinated.     While participating in off-campus events and meetings sponsored by the JHAA/JHM/JHHS participants must follow all public health guidelines mandated by the local jurisdiction and venue at the time of the event, including vaccination and masking and distancing guidance. Johns Hopkins strongly suggests that attendees who join in person be fully vaccinated.     iphone-photography-basics-
 Nov 03, 2021
 07:00 PM
iPhone Photography Basics